Course in Engineering & Technology in Berlin in Germany

Find Course Studies in Engineering & Technology 2017 in Berlin in Germany

Engineering & Technology

Courses are academic classes taught by qualified instructors that are intended to enhance participant’s knowledge of a given area or training in a particular discipline. Courses vary broadly in terms of length, size, content and duration.

Bachelor’s in Engineering are concerned with the practical applications of the advancements in scientific, economic and social theories. It follows a process of observation, design, implementation and maintenance of solutions for all kinds of problems and issues. The discipline encompasses a great variety of fields and students are bound to find a degree they like.

Germany is a great destination for international scholarsand has a high quality higher education system. The value of this level of education has been improved by the Germany's strong economy. Foreign students enjoy excellent living standards in a secure and safe surroundings. Berlin is the capital.

Berlin is a region that has the status of both a city and a state. It is the capital and the largest city in Germany and home to more than 3 million residents. This is a German city that is home to renowned educational establishments of higher learning.

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Reimagining Berlin as a Smart City

TU Berlin Summer & Winter University
Campus Full time July 2017 Germany Berlin

Students with an interdisciplinary interest in urban planning, innovation and knowledge management, digital media & communications technologies, civic tech / engineering, sustainability studies, politics & governance, history. [+]

Course Studies in Engineering & Technology in Berlin in Germany. Summer University block 3: July 24th - August 17th, 2017 Course price: 1.850 Euros 18 hours of class sessions per week, 5 ECTS credit points Topic Berlin is growing. By the year 2030, there will be 250,000 more people living in the city than there are today. This will bring with it an increase in the demand for housing as well as in requirements for mobility, the adaptation of infrastructures and the availability of resources such as water, energy, data and building land. Like many major urban centres around the world, this means that Berlin is also facing a wide variety of challenges for the future: the growing city, the aging city or the city in the midst of structural change all require inter-disciplinary and inter-departmental approaches if solutions are to be found. The Smart City approach aims to find solutions to the ecological, social, economic and cultural challenges faced by Berlin through the use of intelligent technology. Berlin wishes to preserve – and as far as possible enhance – its appeal and its quality of life. (Excerpt from the „Smart City Strategy Berlin”, 2015) Target group Students with an interdisciplinary interest in urban planning, innovation and knowledge management, digital media & communications technologies, civic tech / engineering, sustainability studies, politics & governance, history. Learning Goal/Output Gain an insight into the complex and often conflicting landscape of actors in Berlin working in the cross-cutting field of smart city Learn about the chronology of Berlin’s official smart city policy, the city’s plans and activities Visit some of Berlin’s future sites of innovation where the action happens! Get to know Berlin’s lighthouse smart city projects, including many which involve cutting-edge research and leadership from TU Berlin (such as the E-Bus project, the new 10-point Be.Digital-Agenda and the CHORA-BrainBox) Learn about Berlin’s unique history and how this resulted in today’s opportunities as well as challenges for a digital and sustainable transformation Compare and contrast how Berlin’s Smart City activities differ from those in other cities around the world Critically reflect on the “smart city” concept beyond the narrow definition of ICT providers, but rather understand it as a broad cultural transformation that requires us to reinvent how we manage and govern our cities Get a general understanding of the impact of rapid urbanization on our planet and the role it plays for achieving the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals Contribute insights and experiences from your home city and appreciate the mechanism of city-to-city learning as a key driver for a sustainable “urban age” Introduction to lean innovation and design thinking methodologies as part of the Team Design Challenge Course Components Lectures Group work and class presentations Talks and Q&A with external guests (depends on availability) Field visits to selected smart city projects and innovation sites (e.g. E-Bus, EUREF-Campus, Südkreuz station) Team Design Challenge – develop your own smart city solution to one of Berlin’s existing problems. Short Description “The 19th century was a century of empires, the 20th century was a century of nation states. The 21st century will be a century of cities.” – Former Denver Mayor W. Webb. Like many cities around the world, Berlin wants to become a leading Smart City by 2030. But what does that mean? How can new technologies help to tackle some of Berlin’s biggest challenges? And what can Berlin learn from other cities? In this course you will get a unique insight into Berlin’s history and ambitions as a smart city. We will trace the development of Berlin’s official smart city agenda, appreciate the diverse landscape of actors who lead the change and visit some of the city’s most celebrated smart city projects and innovation hotspots first-hand. This course will challenge you to critically reflect and interrogate the “smart city” concept, contribute your own ideas and experiences from home and gain a broad perspective on how cities are innovating and cooperating all over the world for a more sustainable urban future. Prerequisites The general prerequisites of the TU Berlin Summer University are: at least one year of university experience. This course prefers C1 level English to fully participate in discussions. Lecturer(s) Jonas Schorr (MA/MSc) is a strategic and digital communications professional in the fields of international city cooperation and smart cities. For the last three years, he has been an active part of Berlin’s emerging Smart City scene through his work as a research fellow at TU Berlin. He also works for the Policy Transfer Platform, an innovative knowledge exchange platform for city experts which he coordinates on behalf of Berlin’s Senate Department for Urban Development and the Environment and the Metropolis city network. Prior to this, Jonas completed a traineeship at the European Commission (DG Environment) in Brussels and worked at the London School of Economics’ urban research centre LSE Cities and the Urban Age Programme. He occasionally writes for online publications and think tanks on governance and digital innovation issues in cities. In 2014, he was a jury member for the World Mayor Prize. Jonas holds two master degrees in Global Media & Communications from the London School of Economics and Political Science and Fudan University in Shanghai. He has a BA in Corporate Communications from a leading German business school and used to run his own web design business. He has studied and worked in a variety of cultural contexts, including Germany, France, Belgium, the United Kingdom, Singapore and China. [-]

ICT for Electromobility

TU Berlin Summer & Winter University
Campus Full time June 2017 Germany Berlin

Information and Communication Technologies for electromobility with focus on Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE). [+]

Summer University block 1: June 12th - July 6th, 2017 Course price: 1.850 Euros 18 hours of class sessions per week, 5 ECTS credit points Topic Information and Communication Technologies for electromobility with focus on Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE). Target group Students interested in electromobility, with affinity to computer science. Learning Goal/Output This course covers the relevant ICT topics related to electromobility. After this course, students will be provided with the basic knowledge for implementing electro-mobility services including: Relevant programming concepts related to electro-mobility Computer Communications applied to electromobility Electromobility services architecture and relevant protocols Insights from state of the art research and technologies Course Components The course will include lecture sessions supported by practical exercise sessions. Short Description This course will provide basic knowledge in the relevant ICT-topics used in electromobility, focusing on the Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) and its related services. It will cover the relevant computer science topics related to electromobility including computer communication, programming concepts, fieldbus communication, EVSE technologies, and state of the art research topics. Prerequisites The general prerequisites of the TU Berlin Summer University are: at least one year of university experience + English level B2 or equivalent. Participants should have a general understanding of computer science. Lecturer(s) Dipl.-Ing. Nadim El Sayed has graduated with distinction in computer engineering from the Technical University of Berlin (TU-Berlin) in 2010 and received a distinction award from VDI in 2011. During his studies he was teaching computer science courses at TU-Berlin in the Faculties IV and V. After graduation he joined the Distributed artificial intelligence Laboratory at the TU-Berlin in 2011 as a researcher. Since then he completed numerous projects in the fields of electromobility, smart-grids, and mobile communication. Furthermore he participated in teaching activities of the Chair for Agent Technologies in Business Application and Telecommunications (Faculty IV - Institute of Commercial Information Technology and Quantitative Methods - Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Sahin Albayrak). [-]

DesignBuild Summer Studio

TU Berlin Summer & Winter University
Campus Full time July 2017 Germany Berlin

This DesignBuild Summer Studio focusses on the realisation of a small building project from the initial design to the process of building by the students themselves. This will be carried out in an academic environment, engaging in interdisciplinary collaboration between students of Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Design, Civil Engineering and other related fields. [+]

Course Studies in Engineering & Technology in Berlin in Germany. Summer University block 3: July 24th - August 17th, 2017 Course price: 1.850 Euros 18 hours of class sessions per week, 5 ECTS credit points Target group This DesignBuild Studio is aimed at students who want to gain creative and practical knowledge through making. This course is suitable for students of Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Design, Engineering and other related fields who are willing to leave the boundaries of their desks, and conquer real life scenarios. Skills in building crafts are of an advantage but not essential. Learning Goal/Output The participants will develop their creative, practical and professional skills through creative experimentation and the process of making. Course Components Firstly, creative experimentation in the form of site responsive land art and/or installations will enable the students to explore the spatial qualities of the site. The participants will then develop an idea from the design stage to the built project. An examination of the context and discussions with the clients and users will form the basis for the final design. In a competitive design workshop, the best and most feasible solution(s) will be selected and developed. In collaboration with the users and under the guidance of a craftsman, the design will be built and inaugurated. The course will include the following components: Lectures / seminars Berlin excursions Creative and practical workshops On site photography, installations and/or land art 3d design / model making Design/build studio Interdisciplinary critics Equipment: - Styrofoam cutter, 3D printer, carpentry workshop Budget: - we have a small budget for materials The DesignBuild Studio will be based at the University, transportation will be organised for the 5-8 days of site visits and construction works. Short Description This DesignBuild Summer Studio focusses on the realisation of a small building project from the initial design to the process of building by the students themselves. This will be carried out in an academic environment, engaging in interdisciplinary collaboration between students of Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Design, Civil Engineering and other related fields. The suggested site is Scharfenberg Island, a small island in the northwest of Berlin which is only accessible via a small ferry or rowing boats. Scharfenberg is the home to a school with ca. 450 pupils, the school farm and ca. 9 residents. The idyllic island environment is the perfect location for creative thinking and making. The project will focus on the design of outdoor spaces for learning, celebration, retreat and contemplation. The location will be confirmed towards the end of 2016. The students will firstly explore the spatial qualities of the site through creative experimentation in the form of photography, site responsive land art and/or installations. They will then develop an idea from the design stage to the built project. An examination of the context and discussions with the clients and users will form the basis for the final design. In a competitive design workshop, the best and most feasible solution(s) will be selected and developed. In collaboration with the users and under the guidance of a craftsman, the design will be built and inaugurated. The challenge will be integrate "low-cost" and "high efficiency" requirements with considerations for sustainability, aesthetics, appropriateness, participation and education. Besides the enormous gains in professional knowledge our goal is to make students more sensitive to the ecological, social and cultural implications of their work. In order to profit from the high potential of these small-scale projects the focus has to be placed on the quality of the space that is created. Design decisions and implementation therefore needs to be made precisely and carefully. This project will be run similar to the Summer University project "Panke Platz" that took place in 2016 Prerequisites The willingness to work in a team is a precondition. The general prerequisites of the TU Berlin Summer University are at least one year of university experience and English level B2 or equivalent. Lecturer(s) Simon Colwill, BA(Hons) Dip(Hons) Simon Colwill studied Landscape Architecture at the University of Greenwich in London and worked for many years thereafter as a freelance landscape architect in Berlin. He has been a teaching and research assistant at the Department of Landscape Design and Construction at the Technische Universität in Berlin since 2004. Here he has supervised many studio projects and seminars in the bachelor and master's program. Since 2007 he has been a member of CoCoon (http://cocoon-studio.de/), supervising designbuild projects that follow an interdisciplinary designbuild teaching model involving architects, landscape architects and civil engineers. These projects aim to achieve a balance between innovation, good architectural practice, the technical qualities of the result, as well as making a contribution to the community. He has been running designbuild projects in Mexico, Egypt, Bolivia and in Germany. Florian Zwangsleitner, M.Sc. Florian Zwangsleitner studied Landscape Architecture and Urban Design at the TU Berlin, he also trained as an engineer in timber construction. He then worked as a landscape architect in Berlin. He has been working at the Department of Landscape Construction at the TU Berlin as a teaching and research assistant since May 2016 where he supervises design projects and university seminars. He has been a guest lecturer and co-supervisor of several DesignBuild Studios. As a student, Florian participated in the TU Berlin`s DesignBuild Studio in Oaxaca, Mexico. [-]

Blue Engineering - Engineers with Social and Ecological Responsibility

TU Berlin Summer & Winter University
Campus Full time June 2017 Germany Berlin

The effects of technology on individuals, society and nature and what people can do to create a responsible technology that addresses the needs of everyone while considering possible risks and harms caused by technology. [+]

Summer University block 1: June 12th - July 6th, 2017 Course price: 1.850 Euros 18 hours of class sessions per week, 5 ECTS credit points Topic The effects of technology on individuals, society and nature and what people can do to create a responsible technology that addresses the needs of everyone while considering possible risks and harms caused by technology. Target group Engineering students and students of the humanities with an interest in the workings of technology on individuals, society and nature. Learning Goal/Output The prospective engineers analyze and evaluate the present reciprocal relations of technology, individuals, nature and society by taking different perspectives. Based on this analysis and evaluation, they are able to state their personal perspective and values of the reciprocal relations and act accordingly. The prospective engineers cooperate with others to analyze and evaluate in a democratic process the present reciprocal relations of technology, individuals, nature and society. Based on their analysis and evaluation, they are able to work out a collective understanding with regard to their collective values and democratise the reciprocal relations. Course Components The course will consist of a few regular lectures and mostly of building blocks which will be conducted by the lectures and the student’s themselves and one excursion per week (e.g. waste/drinking water treatment, recycling, lignite pit and lignite power plant, industrial food production). In addition, the students will create, conduct and finally document their own building block for further use. Building blocks, i.e., self-contained study-elements, are at the core of the Blue Engineering course. They provide clear didactical instructions to facilitate a 90 minutes course as well as compact, yet multiple perspectives on a complex topic, e.g., ethical codes, recycling, pre-implementation diagnostics, social businesses and cooperatives. Some of these study elements help to thoroughly analyse single technologies, e.g., energy saving light bulbs, in respect to the ecological, social, economical, political and gender related impacts of these technologies. In other study elements, engineering students learn to shift away from the general paradigm of engineers as problem solvers. They are encouraged to become problem definers in all areas of engineering, including their own proper working conditions. Along with the wide variety of topics, every single building block uses a specific set of wide-spread teaching formats such as case studies, story-telling and station learning. Most building-blocks, however, rely on a specific adaption and new combination of known methods, e.g. learning cascades, advocatus diaboli, triangular method, evaluation sculpture, crime scene investgations and court trials, educational games and challenges. On top, several building blocks make use of newly created methods or are build according to specific forms of pedagogy. Short Description Sustainability in the curriculum of engineering students is either ignored or solely focuses on technological solutions. As the UN Rio+20 debate and its focus on Green Economy shows, there is a strong demand for technological innovations as a remedy for ecological destruction and as pathway to poverty eradication. Consequently, the predominant belief in technological progress is held up through technicians as well as a society wishing for easy technological solutions for complex ecological and social problems. Taking this into account, this course promotes socially and ecologically responsible engineering through a variety of alternative teaching methods. Engineering students acquire the competence to unveil the complex interdependency of their social, political, ecological and economic surroundings. This includes the consideration of different values, interests and needs within a global perspective as well as within one class(room). The course design encourages democratic decision-making not only to solve but also to define problems within the course itself and moreover outside of the classroom. This method is applied in order to adequately respond to the specific needs of users and to cooperatively develop technologies which are socially useful, locally adapted, durable, repairable and recyclable. Prerequisites The general prerequisites of the TU Berlin Summer University are: at least one year of university experience + English level B2 or equivalent. An interest in the reciprocal relations of technology, individuals, nature, society and democracy. Lecturer(s) Henning Meyer holds the chair of machinery system design at Technische Universität Berlin. Among other jobs, he worked in the german industry as head of a research department. He graduated from Technische Universität Braunschweig and holds a doctorate of the same university. André Baier received a master 2 degree in philosophy of norms from Universíté Rennes 1, France. He completed his studies at Technische Universität Berlin receiving the magister artium degree in philosophy. He actively participates in the development and implementation of Blue Engineering – Engineers with Social and Ecological Responsibility - since its beginning in 2009. As of 2012 he is lecturer for this course at Technische Universität Berlin. [-]

Healing Architecture

TU Berlin Summer & Winter University
Campus Full time July 2017 Germany Berlin

The HEALING ARCHITECTURE course explores opportunities to improve health outcomes and well-being for all user groups in healthcare facilities, especially hospitals, by architectural design. [+]

Course Studies in Engineering & Technology in Berlin in Germany. Summer University block 2: July 10th - July 21st, 2017 18 hours of class sessions per week, 5 ECTS credit points Topic The HEALING ARCHITECTURE course explores opportunities to improve health outcomes and well-being for all user groups in healthcare facilities, especially hospitals, by architectural design. Target group Students in the field of architecture, planning, health, health management or public health. Learning Goal/Output Identification of current challenges and opportunities for architecture of healthcare facilities aiming to improve health outcomes and well-being for all user groups in healthcare facilities Basic knowledge about factors influencing architectural design decisions for healthcare facilities, such as environmental factors, epimdemiology (lifestyle-related diseases), medical trends, history and management of healthcare facilities Design, research and evaluation skills related to architectural design of health care facilities Group work & team work Presentation techniques Course Components Input lectures Practical workshops Design charrettes Field trips Group presentations with guest critics Short Description In the first week students will have an introduction to Healing Architecture followed by theoretical inputs on related subjects such as environmental factors, epimdemiology (lifestyle-related diseases), design and evaluation methods, medical trends as well as history and management of healthcare facilities. Students will visit at least two hospitals to understand the complexity of its environments and explore the needs and settings for patients, families and staff. The second week will be dedicated to group work and concept development. Students will team up for design charrettes and workshops and develop concepts addressing patients‘ needs (patient-centered designs) staff needs (staff focused designs) and general layout. The concepts will be presented and discussed in a group presentation with guest critics at the end of the second week. Prerequisites The general prerequisites of the TU Berlin Summer University are: at least one year of university experience + English level B2 or equivalent. Additionally, a max. 1 page motivation letter stating the participant’s purpose and goals in signing up for the course is required. Lecturer(s) Christine Nickl-Weller designs and realizes buildings for healthcare, research and teaching as well as projects in housing and urbanism in Germany and abroad. She joined the Munich-based architecture team of Nickl & Partner in 1989 and became Chief Executive Officer of the corporation in 2008 receiving numerous national and international awards. In 2004, she was appointed Professor at Berlin University of Technology where she holds the chair for the design of hospitals and health care buildings. The chair covers a broad field of topics related to healthcare architecture and urbanism including healing architecture, energy-efficiency in healthcare buildings, healthy urban planning and housing for the elderly. Christine Nickl-Weller initiated the biannual Health Care of the Future symposia taking place in Berlin since 2006 and the Healing Architecture conferences (Berlin, 2011; St. Petersburg 2013; Dubai, 2015) supported by the Federal Ministry of Health. She is author and editor of numerous articles and books and gives lectures in Germany and abroad. Gesche Gerber (TU Berlin-Architecture for Health) Stefanie Matthys (TU Berlin-Architecture for Health) Mena Theissen-Helling (TU Berlin-Architecture for Health) Alvaro Valera Sosa (TU Berlin-Architecture for Health) Guest lecturers: Prof. Hans Nickl Prof. Dr. Cor Wagenaar (tbc) Prof. Frank Christ (tbc) [-]

The Edible City

TU Berlin Summer & Winter University
Campus Full time 4 weeks June 2017 Germany Berlin

The course is suitable for students of all levels of study who want to gain theoretical and practical knowledge for the design of food-productive urban space. [+]

Summer University block 1: June 12th - July 6th, 2017 Course price: 1.850 Euros 18 hours of class sessions per week, 5 ECTS credit points Topic With a focus on urban space and urban space production, this summer course explores how food – in all is aspects from producing to marketing to selling to composting – could become a better-integrated part of our cities. Urban agriculture projects in Berlin will serve as case studies and sites for practical growing/building experience. Target group The course is suitable for students of all levels of study who want to gain theoretical and practical knowledge for the design of food-productive urban space. It is especially suitable for students of architecture, landscape architecture, urban design, urban planning and product design who have an interest in the subject area. Learning Goal/Output Students will develop their theoretical knowledge of the emerging subject areas of urban agriculture and urban food systems and learn about methods to design urban space that has a food focus. They will also develop their skills in particpatory design and building processes by working with selected urban agriculture projects in Berlin. Students are encouraged to record and reflect on their learning by means of sketches, photographs and text. Course Components Teaching will be structured in 4 multi-disciplinary components, each running for 1 week and highlighting a particular aspect of the urban food growing theme. Each week will be introduced by context-setting lectures/seminars. These will be followed by practical/design excercises and workshops in and/or for selected urban agriculture projects in Berlin. Participatory design and building methods will guide our work in and/or for our participating projects. Each week will conclude with a series of seminars/lectures aimed at synthesising and recording the acquired theoretical knowledge and practical skills. Students will have access to design workshop spaces and facilities at the University and will visit selected urban agriculture projects in Berlin. Subjects for in-depth investigations (in groups) will be drawn from either the theoretical inputs given or from the practical needs of the participating urban agriculture projects. Short Description With a focus on urban space and urban space production, this summer course explores how food – in all is aspects from producing to marketing to selling to composting – could become a better-integrated part of our cities. Focus of the course are the effects and consequences that our current and future food systems, and especially urban food production, may have on the shape, use and quality of open urban space. When exploring this, we use the European city as a reference working with Berlin as our case study example. Employing methods of design research, we will carry out our investigations in an academic environment that allows theoretical and practice-based exploration of the subject area as well as interdisciplinary collaboration between students of urban design, urban planning, product design, architecture and landscape architecture. As this subject area can be approached from a variety of starting points, the course welcomes particular interests and experiences the prospective students may bring. Urban agriculture projects in Berlin will serve as case studies and sites for practical growing/building experience. Students will have the opportunity to get to know some Berlin-based food-growing projects in greater detail by being engaged in gardening and/or building acitvities that will be jointly planned and carried out by the students and the project participants. Throughout the course, students will be supported in finding their own working methods for recording and evaluating information, as well as for designing and presenting their ideas. Sketching, photographing, building, gardening, discussing, listening, writing and collaging may be some of the tools we will employ individually or in student teams. Prerequisites An open and inquisitive mind as well as the willingness to work in teams is a precondition. The general prerequisites of the TU Berlin Summer University are the following: at least one year of university experience + English level B2 or equivalent. Lecturer(s) Katrin Bohn - course leader Katrin Bohn is an architect and urban practitioner and a Senior Lecturer in architecture at the University of Brighton, UK. She holds a Diploma in Architecture from the Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, Germany, and a Master of Science in Architecture from the University of East London, UK. Between 2010 and 2014, she was guest professor at the Technische Universität in Berlin where she headed the Department City & Nutrition. Katrin has taught, lectured, published and exhibited widely on the design concept of CPUL [Continuous Productive Urban Landscape] which she and architect André Viljoen contributed to the international urban design discourse in 2004. Her projects on productive urban landscapes include consultancy, feasability studies and design proposals as well as food-growing installations and participatory events, mainly for clients in the UK and Germany. In 2015, Katrin won the RIBA President's Award for Outstanding University-located Research. Simon Colwill - guest lecturer Simon Colwill (BA(Hons) Dip(Hons)) studied Landscape Architecture at the University of Greenwich in London and worked for many years thereafter as a freelance landscape architect in Berlin. He has been a teaching and research assistant at the Department of Landscape Design and Construction at the Technische Universität in Berlin since 2004. Since 2007, Simon has been a member of CoCoon (http://cocoon-studio.de/), supervising designbuild projects that follow an interdisciplinary designbuild teaching model involving architects, landscape architects and civil engineers. André Viljoen - guest lecturer André Viljoen is Professor of Architecture at the University of Brighton in the UK (http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/staff/andre-viljoen). He studied architecture at the Dublin Institute of Technology (Diploma in Architecture) and holds a Master of Science in Architecture from the University of East London, UK. With Katrin Bohn he has developed the Continuous Productive Urban Landscape concept and is currently leading an Arts and Humanities Research Council funded international network exploring pathways from practice to policy for productive urban landscapes. [-]

Precision Engineering Measurement & Design

TU Berlin Summer & Winter University
Campus Full time 4 weeks June 2017 Germany Berlin

The course is aimed at students from all engineering majors. [+]

Course Studies in Engineering & Technology in Berlin in Germany. Summer University block 1: June 12th - July 6th, 2017 Course price: 1.850 Euros 18 hours of class sessions per week, 5 ECTS credit points Topic High-precision measurements, statistical data analysis, standard uncertainty analysis methods. Target group The course is aimed at students from all engineering majors. Learning Goal/Output Upon course completion students should have a working understanding of precision measurements and the engineering design process. Students will be familiar with how to approach engineering measurements, what uncertainty in measurements means in practice, and how to statistically examine engineering data in design. Course Components Three lecture days per week Tours: Tour 1: Museum of Technology Tour 2: BMW Plant Berlin Tour 3: Military History Museum Varied assessment methods Short Description Precision Engineering Design & Measurement covers the fundamental practices common to all engineering majors in making and reporting basic engineering measurements and their use in designing high-precision items. Students will learn about the engineering design process, commonly used engineering measurement tools, statistical analysis and standard uncertainty analysis methods. Three local tours at businesses and museums will punctuate how precision measurements are used in engineering design practice. Prerequisites The general prerequisites of the TU Berlin Summer University are: at least one year of university experience + English level B2 or equivalent. This course is intended for students from all engineering majors that have successfully completed a college calculus and physics course. Course content will be applicable and use examples from a variety of engineering disciplines, so students from all engineering majors are encouraged to participate. Lecturer(s) Dr. Daniel Dickrell, Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida Dan Dickrell is an Assistant Engineer in the College of Engineering at the University of Florida in Gainesville, FL. He is also a member of the graduate research faculty in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE). He holds a PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Florida and has worked as a mechanical engineer at Argonne National Laboratory in Argonne, IL, Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM, and in private industry. Since 2007, Dr. Dickrell has taught various engineering design and mechanics courses in the MAE department (Statics, Mechanics of Materials, Introduction to Mechanical Design). He also teaches first-year course: Introduction to Engineering Design and Programming for the College of Engineering. In 2012-2013 academic year he was voted "Teacher of the Year" in the MAE department by students and faculty. Dr. Pamela Dickrell, Center of Research on Engineering Education, College of Engineering, University of Florida Dr. Pamela Dickrell has been the director of the Gator Engineering CORE since 2014, which focuses on engineering education research at the second and third year undergraduate levels. The company looks at ways to give students a solid foundation in problem solving skills in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Before that, she held directorships at the UF EDGE at University of Florida, and was an adjunct assistant professor there from 2005 to 2007, teaching subjects in Engineering Statistics and Mechanics or Materials. [-]

Introduction to 3D-Scanning and Printing

TU Berlin Summer & Winter University
Campus Full time 4 weeks June 2017 Germany Berlin

Hosted in the fully-equipped laboratory of the 3D Lab of the TU Berlin, this four-week course offers introduction to working with professional 3D printing technologies such as laser sintering with polyamide and powder printing with mineral powder (modified gypsum). [+]

Summer University block 1: June 12th - July 6th, 2017 Course price: 2200 Euros 18 hours of class sessions per week, 5 ECTS credit points Topic: 3D Scanning and Printing Target group Students with an interest in 3D printing, 3D scanning and who want to gain insight into work with professional 3D printing technologies. As this technology covers numerous application areas, this course could be interesting for students from scientific disciplines, engineering, design, fine art or art history. Short Description Hosted in the fully-equipped laboratory of the 3D Lab of the TU Berlin, this four-week course offers introduction to working with professional 3D printing technologies such as laser sintering with polyamide and powder printing with mineral powder (modified gypsum). The course provides an introduction to manufacturing 3D printed objects with the laser sintering system and the powder printer of the 3D Lab, as well as data generation and data preparation for it. Participants will gain basic knowledge of the use of two professional 3D printing technologies, structured light scanners and related software. The course starts with an introduction to the technologies used at the 3D Lab and selected projects from its portfolio, to give participants an impression of the various possible uses of 3D technologies. Ongoing course lectures will be accompanied by detailed practical units focusing on the use of the machines and the preparation of printable objects. Specifically, the practical training will develop student’s skills in the use of structured light scanners, 3D printing technologies, and in meeting the geometrical requirements for successful 3D prints. As 3D printing and 3D scanning cover numerous application areas, this course is interesting for participants from several disciplines including science, engineering, design, fine art or art history. The course provides a good starting point for students who are interested in further applications of these technologies. Prerequisites The general prerequisites of the TU Berlin Summer University are as follows: at least one year of university experience + English level B2 or equivalent. A specific requirement of the course is an, at least, basic knowledge of CAD software. It is recommended that students use their own laptops for processing their own 3D files. Lecturer(s) - Prof. Dr. Hartmut Schwandt - Meisterschüler Joachim Weinhold 3D Labor, Institut für Mathematik, TU Berlin [-]

Programming in Java

TU Berlin Summer & Winter University
Campus Full time 4 weeks January 2017 Germany Berlin

This course is designed for students who want to look into the field of computer science. [+]

Course Studies in Engineering & Technology in Berlin in Germany. Winter University block 1: January 3rd to 27th, 2017 Course price: 1.850 Euros 18 hours of class sessions per week, 5 ECTS credit points Target group This course is designed for students who want to look into the field of computer science. Learning Goal/Output After this course you will be able to understand basic concepts of writing a computer program with the programming language Java. Take a look at the syllabus below. Course Components Topics like variables, loops, objects, input and output, user interfaces, collections, sorting, concurrent programming and event-driven programming will be covered. Topic list: Variables and Types of Data Loops and Conditions Arrays Methods Classes and Objects Object inheritance Collections Creating and Designing Data Types Sorting and Searching Graphics Input and Output Short Description In this course you learn first the basic knowledge of computer programming and then how to write computer programs using the programming language Java. You will be working at the computer. There will be some assignments which will give you more understanding of the programming concepts. Prerequisites The general prerequisites of the TU Berlin Summer & Winter University are that candidates have B2 level English and at least one year of university experience. In addition, the following requirements are necessary for this course: Basic computer skills and knowledge of school mathematics. In mathematics is recommend to know: - How to calculate with complex numbers - How to calculate with matrices - Handle planes and lines It is recommend to know some basic Linux commands (but they will be also introduced in the course). Lecturer(s) Prof. Dr. Rand Kouatly Dr. Rand Kouatly is a visiting professor at Technische Universität Berlin Faculty of Audio Communication; he has experience of more than 20 years in teaching nationally and internationally with lots of courses in the fields of Information Technology and Communication Engineering, including Java. [-]

CanSat: Hands-on Satellite Design

TU Berlin Summer & Winter University
Campus Full time 4 weeks January 2017 Germany Berlin

This course is designed for students with a general understanding of engineering who want to gain insight into the exciting topic of space technologies. With the practical approach applied, students experience working on a challenging project in an interdisciplinary team. [+]

Winter school: January 3rd to 27th, 2017 Course price: 2.200 Euros 18 hours of class sessions per week, 5 ECTS credit points Topic Space Technology Target group This course is designed for students with a general understanding of engineering who want to gain insight into the exciting topic of space technologies. With the practical approach applied, students experience working on a challenging project in an interdisciplinary team. This prepares them for a systems engineering career with a leading position in the engineering industry. With the basic knowledge in space technologies that is imparted in this course, students have a good starting point to prepare themselves for a continuing education in space engineering. It is recommended that students use their own laptops for the hands-on project. Learning Goal/Output After taking part in this course, students will have knowledge of the most important topics related to space technologies. Students will know the parts of a space system and understand their correlations, and will be able to plan and conduct a space mission. Practically, students will be capable of designing a part of a space system with regard to mechanics, electronics and programming. Course Components The course starts with introductory lectures about the most important topics related to space technologies. In parallel, a practical training will be given to develop specific engineering skills in mechanics, electronics and programming that are necessary to conduct the hands-on project. During project work units, parts of a CanSat will be designed with supervision in smaller groups. During a launch campaign, the CanSat will be tested under real conditions. The course is supplemented by an excursion to space related companies and institutions in Berlin. Short Description A CanSat is a small satellite in shape of a commercial beverage can that performs several measuring tasks. In this course, a CanSat is designed, built and tested in the field during a rocket launch. Therefore, all basics of topics related to exciting area of space technologies is imparted and practical skills for the development of a CanSat are trained. The theoretical units are supplemented by practical exercises. Parts of the CanSat are developed in intensely supervised small groups. During an excursion to a site in Berlin where space related companies and institutions are located, the participants shall gain insight into facilities used for the development of satellites. Prerequisites The general prerequisites of the TU Berlin Summer University are: at least one year of university experience + English level B2 or equivalent. Participants should have a general understanding of engineering. Lecturer(s) Prof. Dr.-Ing. Klaus Brieß is head of the Chair of Space Technology at TU Berlin’s Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He has dealt extensively with nano and pico satellite technologies and their various uses for the communication and remote sensing of the Earth, Moon and planets. Three research assistants of the Chair of Space Technology, Dr. Zizung Yoon, Cem Avsar, Dipl.-Ing. and Sebastian Trowitzsch, Dipl.-Ing. are involved in the summer school course. Prof. Dr.-Ing. Klaus Brieß Study of Information Technology at Technical University of Ilmenau, scientific assistant at the university of Ilmenau, research in automotive electronics, since 1989 working experience in the field of space technology, 1992-2003 engineering and research work at German Aerospace Center DLR, camera design for the Russian Mars-96 mission and other space imagers, extension studies in satellite communication (USA) and at the International Space University, system engineer in different space projects and proposals for Earth remote sensing or planetary exploration, since 2003 full professor at TU Berlin, Pertinent activities: member of International Academy of Astronautics (IAA), head of the section "Space Technology " of the German Aerospace Society "Deutsche Gesellschaft für Luft- und Raumfahrt Lilienthal-Oberth e.V.", member of “Gesellschaft zur Förderung des akademischen Nachwuchses”, co-founder of the “Space Initiative Berlin-Brandenburg (RIBB)”, and others , more than 130 international publications Cem Avsar Cem Avsar graduated in Aerospace Engineering from the Technical University of Berlin in 2010. During his studies at TU Berlin, he was teaching informatics for eight semesters as tutor. Also, he participated in practical space related projects during his time of studies. With his graduation, he joined the staff of scientific researchers at the TU Berlin, Chair of Space Technology. He worked on modular satellite architectures and CubeSats. As Prof. Dr.-Ing. Klaus Brieß‘ teaching assistant, he was strongly involved in shaping the space technology curriculum. He also managed research projects, for instance a student-built rover. His projects enclosure the direct involvement of students in hands-on lecture courses. To date, he has lectured numerous space technology related courses, e.g. Satellite Technology, Aerospace Electronics, Aerospace System Design, Space Robotics and many more. He constantly edeavours to apply modern approaches of practical engineering teaching methods. Today, he is managing director of the Berlin-based space company beSpace. Nikolas Korn Nikolas Korn graduated in Aerospace Engineering from TU Berlin in 2014. During his studies, he was working at GEA Grasso on 3D CAD modeling of screw compressor parts. Later he joined the PiNaSys as researcher. There he is focused on hardware and software development of miniaturized attitude determination systems for parabolic flight experiments as well as GPS orbit simulations. In April 2015 he participated on the 25. DLR parabolic flight campaign in Bordeaux, France. Sebastian Trowitzsch Sebastian Trowitzsch holds a Diploma of Aerospace Engineering, he graduated from TU Berlin in 2010. From 2005 to 2012, he was actively involved in the design, verification and operation of the picosatellite BEESAT. Since 2010, he is project manager and system engineer of the follow-up mission BEESAT-2. Dr. Zizung Yoon After graduating from TU Berlin, Zizung Yoon joined the development team of the small satellite TET (120 kg) in the company Astro- und Feindwerktechnik. Along with the research experience gained in the industry, he accomplished his Ph.D. in the field of fault tolerant attitude control system. Currently he is leading a research team with the goal to develop and launch a nanosatellite mission to demonstrate an intersatellite communication network. He has profound experience in lecturing in subjects related to spacecraft dynamics and contro [-]