Overview

Students have various goals that they are keen to achieve, such as wishing to have a career in an international environment, or gaining a competitive advantage in their career path. Others may want to attend an Arabic-speaking university or seek better opportunities for future employment. In order to be able to reach the above mentioned goals, students are required to take one or more of the exams listed below. Al Baher offers preparation courses for such exams which will be your essential step towards success, and with the help of our experienced and professional instructors, we will ensure the best scores for you.

INTERAGENCY LANGUAGE ROUNDTABLE ( ILR)

The Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR) is an unfunded Federal interagency organization established for the coordination and sharing of information about language-related activities at the Federal level. It serves as the premier way for departments and agencies of the Federal government to keep abreast of the progress and implementation of techniques and technology for language learning, language use, language testing and other language related activities.

ILR Language Skill-Level Descriptions are descriptions of different levels of proficiency for four different language “skills”—Speaking, Reading, Listening and Writing. The scale used to describe each skill has six Base Levels, ranging from 0 “No functional proficiency” to 5 “Functionally equivalent to a highly educated native speaker/reader/etc.” These guidelines are accepted by all agencies of the federal government. They are used as a primary reference in the different government tests of language ability. Level 2 is defined as “Limited Working Proficiency.” Many USG agencies require a minimum of Level 3, “General Professional Proficiency.

” The ILR Skill Level Descriptions and the ILR Scale are used to develop and score U.S. Government (USG) tests of language skills. USG language tests are used for USG employees only and are not available to private individuals, commercial services, or other non-government organizations. Applicants to USG positions may be tested if they are sponsored by a governmental agency.

The ILR Skill Level Descriptions and the ILR Scale are used to develop and score U.S. Government (USG) tests of language skills. USG language tests are used for USG employees only and are not available to private individuals, commercial services, or other non-government organizations. Applicants to USG positions may be tested if they are sponsored by a governmental agency.

The ILR as an entity does not develop or administer language tests itself. Many government agencies refer to the ILR Language Skill-Level Descriptions in scoring language proficiency tests and assigning scores, but each test is different in some important respects. In fact, a test administered by one government agency may not necessarily be used for seeking employment in another government agency. In general, all government tests are administered only at the request of federal government agencies, and they are not available to private citizens.

ORAL PROFICIENCY INTERVIEW (OPI)

The ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interview, or OPI, is a live, 20-30 minute telephone conversation between a certified ACTFL tester and the student. It is a valid and reliable test that measures how well a person speaks a language.

The procedure is standardized in order to assess global speaking ability, measuring language production holistically by determining patterns of strengths and weaknesses.

An OPI can be requested on the ACTFL scale or the Inter-Agency Language Roundtable (ILR) scale. An ACTFL OPI will rate between Novice and Superior on the ACTFL scale. An ILR OPI will rate between ILR 0 (No Proficiency) and ILR 5 (Functionally Native).

The OPI assesses language proficiency in terms of the ability to use the language effectively and appropriately in real-life situations. It does not address when, where, why, or the way in which a speaker has acquired his/her language.

The OPI is not an achievement test assessing a speaker’s acquisition of specific aspects of course and curriculum content, nor is it tied to any specific method of instruction. The OPI does not compare one individual’s performance to others, but each individual performance to the assessment criteria.

THE DEFENSE LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY TEST (DLPT)

The Defense Language Proficiency Test (or DLPT) is a battery of foreign language tests produced by the Defense Language Institute and used by the United States Department of Defense (DoD).

They are intended to assess the general language proficiency of native English speakers in a specific foreign language, in the skills of reading and listening. An Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) is sometimes administered to Defense Language Institute students to establish the graduate's proficiency in speaking following training there, but it is not part of the DLPT.

The tests are meant to measure how well a person can function in real-life situations in a foreign language according to well-defined linguistic tasks and assessment criteria. Originally paper tests, they are increasingly delivered by computer.

The tests are used to assess the skill level of DoD linguists. Linguists are tested once a year in the skills of reading and listening. Test scores determine the amount of Foreign Language Proficiency Pay (FLPP) that a military linguist receives, and also whether they are qualified for certain positions that require language aptitude. DLPT scores may also figure into the readiness rating of a military linguist unit.

Scoring for the current (2007) series of tests, called DLPT5, is, like that for their predecessors, based on the guidelines of the Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR), with the test results stated as levels 0+ through 3 or up to 4 for some languages.

The DLPT5 includes separate tests for reading and listening comprehension. In addition, many languages have both lower-range tests going from level 0+ through 3 and upper-range tests going from level 3 to 4. In the "big" languages (for example, Russian, Chinese and Arabic) the test format will be multiple choice.

The test taker will read or listen to foreign language passages, read questions in English, and provide short answers in English.

Program taught in:
  • English

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Last updated May 6, 2019
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