Helsinki Summer School

Introduction

PLEASE NOTE! The next Helsinki Summer School will be arranged in 2017

Do you want to study abroad? Helsinki Summer School offers university students and graduates a truly international, strongly academic summer session where the research-based teaching and talented young minds meet and mingle to create something new. We provide you with an August that will stand out in your academic curriculum!

FACILITIES

Helsinki Summer School students benefit from the great services and facilities offered by the University of Helsinki.

Moodle Online Learning Environment

Helsinki Summer School uses Moodle online learning environment for distributing study materials, course programmes and general information. Some of the courses use it also for group work, learning assignments etc. Students will receive their credentials for Moodle before coming to Finland.

Learning Centres and Computer Facilitie

Summer school students have access to the University’s Learning Centres and receive a computer license that allow them to print black and white documents, to have unlimited access to the extensive computer facilities and to use the wireless Internet connection at the University.

Libraries

Upon request, students can be issued a certificate of attendance allowing them to borrow books from the Helsinki University Library.

Student Cafeterias

Helsinki Summer School students may eat at UniCafe student cafeterias at any of the campuses.

Sports Centers

HSS students are entitled to use the gym and participate in the group training sessions offered by the UniSport gyms and sports centers at the University of Helsinki for a student friendly price.

This school offers programs in:
  • English

View Summer courses »

Programs

This school also offers:

Summer courses

CHALLENGES OF DEMOCRATIC DEVELOPMENT IN EASTERN EUROPE

Campus Full time 17 days August 2017 Finland Helsinki

This course offers an overview of the current challenges of social and political development in Eastern Europe. Taught by a group of area studies experts in history, political science, media studies and sociology, the course views Eastern Europe as including the former Eastern Bloc countries, i.e., the Baltic states, East Central and South-Eastern Europe, the Balkans and Ukraine. Russia is discussed only as a reference point to the area of our concern: there won’t be any specific lectures on Russian developments. [+]

PLEASE NOTE! This course was held in 2015, new courses will be arranged in 2017 Target students The course is designed for advanced undergraduates or Master’s level students of humanities and social sciences. Synopsis This course offers an overview of the current challenges of social and political development in Eastern Europe. Taught by a group of area studies experts in history, political science, media studies and sociology, the course views Eastern Europe as including the former Eastern Bloc countries, i.e., the Baltic states, East Central and South-Eastern Europe, the Balkans and Ukraine. Russia is discussed only as a reference point to the area of our concern: there won’t be any specific lectures on Russian developments. The course provides students with new, multidisciplinary approaches to the study of politics and society with a focus on issues that hinder democratic conduct. Addressed will be questions of nationalism, populism, corruption, authoritarian rule, poverty, the Roma situation, politics of history, cultural policy, civil society and environmental problems. In order to get a better grasp of Eastern European challenges in today’s globalised world, the course offers insights into recent history and post-communist transition. Learning objectives The students will gain a broad overview of current societal and political developments in the region. The purpose is also to discuss critically the concept of democracy, which is sometimes understood normatively. The students will be acquainted with new multidisciplinary approaches and innovative pedagogical methods to understand the complexity of politics and society in this area. The course will also provide supplemental information for students looking to specialise in subjects and fields of research covered by the course. Ongoing cutting-edge research projects, carried out at the University of Helsinki, will be introduced by visits to several research centres. Course format and teaching methods The course entails a total of 30 hours of teaching with various activating learning formats, such as lectures, flipped classroom, debates and small workshops. We apply new methods that promote critical thinking and discursivity. Every lecture includes mandatory pre-reading, and the class format will contain a 60-minute lecture and a 30-minute workshop. The syllabus with course readings will be disseminated to students before the course begins. Teachers and lecturers Dr Katalin Miklóssy (Aleksanteri Institute, Finnish Centre for Russian and Eastern European Studies, University of Helsinki), one of the founding members of the Teachers’ Academy of the University of Helsinki, is responsible for the planning of the course. Other teachers include researchers affiliated with the Aleksanteri Institute and the Departments of Political and Economic Studies, and of Finnish, Finno-Ugrian and Scandinavian Studies at the University of Helsinki. Means and criteria of assessment Attendance, course readings and final exam. Grading is based on attendance, participation in discussions and completion of the required assignments and the final exam. Grading scale: 5 = excellent 4 = very good 3 = good 2 = average 1 = poor 0 = fail. [-]

CO-OPERATIVE ENTERPRISE LAW

Campus Full time 17 days

Co-operative enterprise law is only rarely part of teaching curricula, even if about one billion members around the world are involved in this special form of enterprise with an economic and social impact to match. The repeated crisis resilience of co-operatives and the growing awareness that sustainable development issues must also be addressed by and through enterprises bring this shortcoming to light. The issue is tackled by international governmental instruments and by the International Cooperative Alliance Blueprint for the Cooperative Decade 2011–2020. [+]

PLEASE NOTE! This course was held in 2015, new courses will be arranged in 2017 Target Students Advanced Bachelor’s and Master’s students, including professionals already working, interested in co-operative law. Synopsis Co-operative enterprise law is only rarely part of teaching curricula, even if about one billion members around the world are involved in this special form of enterprise with an economic and social impact to match. The repeated crisis resilience of co-operatives and the growing awareness that sustainable development issues must also be addressed by and through enterprises bring this shortcoming to light. The issue is tackled by international governmental instruments and by the International Cooperative Alliance Blueprint for the Cooperative Decade 2011–2020. This course is to create an understanding of the factors which shape co-operative law. The term “co-operative law” also incorporates other fields of law as they impact on the structure and operations of co-operatives, such as labour law, tax law, competition law and accounting and bookkeeping standards, as well as law making and implementation procedures. As students come from different national backgrounds, reference to specific co-operative laws will only be made by way of example. Learning objectives At the end of the course the students will be able to distinguish the co-operative form of enterprise from other forms, especially from the stock company, in terms of its legal structure. This includes co-operative management and governance, the nature and structure of its capital and its control mechanisms. The students will learn about developments that shape co-operative laws, not least as co-operatives take new forms under globalisation. These complex developments include a general trend to harmonise law; the emergence of international regulations which directly impact on enterprises; regional co-operative legislation and regional model laws. Course format and teaching methods Classroom teaching connected to course literature and blended learning elements (digital material) and visits to co-operative organisations. Teachers and lecturers The course is led by Dr Hagen Henrÿ, Research Director and Adjunct Professor, University of Helsinki Ruralia Institute; Dr Eliisa Troberg; and Pekka Hytinkoski, E-learning co-ordinator, pekka.hytinkoski(at)helsinki.fi . Other teachers to be confirmed. Means and criteria of assessment Grading scale: 5 = excellent 4 = very good 3 = good 2 = average 1 = poor 0 = fail Reading materials will help the students follow the lectures, contribute to the discussions and prepare the final essay. The grade is based on an independent course assignment (learning diary, essay or written exam). [-]

COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE

Campus Full time 17 days August 2017 Finland Helsinki

Students at Master’s and doctoral levels in psychology, cognitive science, speech science, musicology, neuroscience, linguistics, medicine and biology. [+]

PLEASE NOTE! This course was held in 2015, new courses will be arranged in 2017 Target Students Students at Master’s and doctoral levels in psychology, cognitive science, speech science, musicology, neuroscience, linguistics, medicine and biology. Synopsis The human brain and its ability to adapt to the demands of the environment is at the core of our course. This course is particularly useful for students who wish to gain knowledge about the most recent developments in auditory cognitive neuroscience in particular. The course programme focuses on brain functions in the framework of neuroplasticity. The course consists of tutorials on brain research methods and lectures about current topics. There are several demonstrations on practical laboratory work with modern brain imaging techniques such as electroencephalography (EEG), magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The students also have an opportunity to introduce their projects and research outcomes in poster sessions. Learning objectives The course will enable students to understand the theoretical principles, promises and limitations of modern brain research methods. They will gain hands-on experience in data acquisition and analyses. They will also learn about the most recent advances in using these methods in order to better understand human cognition and learning particularly in the domains of language and music. Course format and teaching methods Lectures, team work, hands-on training with brain research methods, poster sessions. Teachers and lecturers The lecturers will include the following international experts of the field: Prof. Merav Ahissar, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel Prof. Matt Davis, MRC, Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit (CBU), Cambridge, U.K. Prof. Nadine Gaab, Childern’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA Prof. Heikki Lyytinen, University of Jyväskylä, Finland Prof. Marc Schönwiesner, University of Montreal, Canada Dr. Jan Wikgren, University of Jyväskylä, Finland Dr. Minna Lehtonen, Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland Dr. Sari Ylinen, University of Helsinki, Finland Methodological tutorials will be given by: Prof. Risto Ilmoniemi, Aalto University, Finland Prof. Lauri Parkkonen, Aalto University, Finland Prof. Marc Schönwiesner, University of Montreal, Canada Prof. Minna Huotilainen, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health and University of Helsinki, Finland Means and criteria of assessment Learning diary Grading: Pass/Fail [-]

DEVELOPING INTERCULTURAL AWARENESS OF SELFNESS AND OTHERNESS

Campus Full time 17 days August 2017 Finland Helsinki

This course is suitable for advance-level students from the following backgrounds: intercultural studies, anthropology, sociology, social psychology, psychology, gender studies, postcolonial studies, philosophy, linguistics and related multidisciplinary programs. [+]

PLEASE NOTE! This course was held in 2015, new courses will be arranged in 2017 Target Students This course is suitable for advance-level students from the following backgrounds: intercultural studies, anthropology, sociology, social psychology, psychology, gender studies, postcolonial studies, philosophy, linguistics and related multidisciplinary programs. Synopsis & Learning Objectives During this course participants will reflect on self- and otherness, and critically review the supposedly culturally determined differences usually highlighted in intercultural communication studies. The aim is to: show how the concept of “the Other” is changing in our day and age, and how this change influences intercultural communication studies develop critical cultural awareness of self and otherness illustrate how otherness can be, and is, constructed and deconstructed reflect upon the power of visual communication in construing “the Other”, either positively or negatively give insights into the approaches to interculturality from the point of view of hermeneutics and critical interpretivism enable students to critically analyze the concept of identity as well as identitarian claims in their various articulations understand how the dynamics of diversity work in a contemporary urban setting by observing and documenting cultural expressions of diversity Course format and teaching methods The course starts with introductory lectures about the topic, showing how different themes and disciplinary perspectives come together in intercultural communication. During the course the students will do smaller assignments, individually as well as in pairs, and the final work will be done in groups. Students will report their findings in formal presentations to be discussed by their fellow students and assessed by the course teacher. During the course several different didactic approaches will be used. Teachers and lecturers Lecturer: Dr. Daria Bahtina-Jantsikene, Utrecht University, the Netherlands,daria.bahti.jants(at)gmail.com Daria Bahtina-Jantsikene is a multidisciplinary researcher with a degree in linguistics (UiL OTS, Utrecht University, 2013) and background in English language and literature (Tartu University, 2006 and 2009) and intercultural communication (University of Lugano, 2007). She collaborates with EMICC (European Masters in Intercultural Communication), a network of ten European universities specializing in intercultural communication. She has also been a part of Toolkit for Transnational Communication, an integrated research group on the new modes of multilingual communication. Her main research focus is lingua receptiva, a multilingual mode of communication in which interlocutors speak their own language and master the language of the other well enough to understand what is said to them. Successful communication in this mode presupposes sufficient alignment of linguistic, interactional and intercultural competences and thus serves a good example of deconstructing ‘the other’ as a means of reaching mutual understanding. The behaviour that lies behind the process of alignment relies on mutual adaptation and aiming at understanding ’the other’ to the best of one’s knowledge, a skill also useful in improving the quality of intercultural communication. Her other interests include multilingualism in general, code-switching, pragmatics, interactive construction of common ground, and Estonian-Russian communication. Since 2009 she has supervised a number of MA theses and given workshops and training courses at university level. Currently, she combines raising a child and working as a teacher and a translator at a language school. Means and criteria of assessment Active participation in lectures, assignments, and group work presentations. [-]

ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT OF URBAN GREEN SPACE

Campus Full time 17 days August 2017 Finland Helsinki

Ecology and Management of Urban Green Space is intended for students who have completed two to four years of study in relevant disciplines as well as for MSc students and professionals whose fields are related to the subject matter of the course. [+]

PLEASE NOTE! This course was held in 2015, new courses will be arranged in 2017 Target Students Ecology and Management of Urban Green Space is intended for students who have completed two to four years of study in relevant disciplines as well as for MSc students and professionals whose fields are related to the subject matter of the course. Synopsis This course introduces students to the theory and practice of ecology and management of urban green areas. The course will tackle urban sustainability, the ecosystem services approach and social-ecological linkages in city and green space planning, and will provide examples of designing a green city. The excursions focus on ecology and environmental technology as linked to urban green space and water elements. Another key focus is the role of green space in improving the ecological function of urban areas. Learning objectives After completing the course, the students will have learned both basic and specific features of urban green space ecology, management and planning from the Finnish and an international perspective. They will have learned about the ecosystem services approach and how these services can make urban green space useful for urban residents. The students will be ready to apply the information, knowledge and skills acquired during the course in the theoretical and practical context of their own countries and cities. Course format and teaching methods The course contains lectures (indoors and on the field), group exercises and discussions, excursions, independent assignments and study, and an exam. The lectures and coursework are given by researchers based at the Department of Environmental Sciences in the University of Helsinki and in other universities and institutions. Course readings Prior to the course, the students are expected to read two relevant research articles (provided before the course begins) and write a short analytic essay based on them. The participants will also be asked to provide a short description of their own academic background, to explain their interest in this course, and to indicate their course expectations. These assignments must be completed and submitted one week before the start of classes. There will also be other reading tasks during the course. Teachers and lecturers The course is led by Dr Vesa Yli-Pelkonen, who is involved in teaching and research on urban ecology at the Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki. The lectures and coursework are given by researchers based at the Department of Environmental Sciences and in other universities and institutions. See the preliminary course programme for 2014 for examples. Means and criteria of assessment Assessment is based on class participation, group work and excursions, and on completed assignments and the final exam. Exam grading scale: 5 = excellent 4 = very good 3 = good 2 = average 1 = poor 0 = fail. [-]

ENGLISH AS A LINGUA FRANCA – A NEW LANGUAGE?

Campus Full time 17 days August 2017 Finland Helsinki

The course is suitable for students at Master’s and Doctoral levels as well as language professionals who have an interest in English studies, general linguistics or language teaching and assessment. [+]

PLEASE NOTE! This course was held in 2015, new courses will be arranged in 2017 Target Students The course is suitable for students at Master’s and Doctoral levels as well as language professionals who have an interest in English studies, general linguistics or language teaching and assessment. Synopsis English has become a global language of intercultural communication and is used worldwide as a contact language between people who do not share a common native language. Non-native speakers of English are increasingly using the language with each other in areas such as academia, business, diplomacy, sport and personal relationships. How does this new sociolinguistic situation affect the language itself? This course looks at linguistic questions around the use of English as a lingua franca (ELF). Students will get hands-on experience with features of authentic ELF data and explore the ways in which cognitive properties of multilingual processing can explain them. The course will move from linguistic investigations to conclude with the implications of ELF research for language teaching and testing. The course content is structured around a series of lectures by several ELF researchers, with each lecture topic developed with students in a collaborative workshop format. Strategies for successful communication in a lingua franca will be discussed throughout the course. Topics such as cross-linguistic interference, multilingual resources, code-switching, approximate forms in second language use, and accommodation strategies which are important for successful communication in international settings will be taken up. Different linguistic databases used in our own ELF research will also be employed in the course. For more information on our research and resources, see the ELFA project webpages:helsinki.fi/elfa or the ELFA project research blog. Learning objectives The students will get acquainted with the concept of ELF and its theoretical background. They will think of the implications of ELF research for the future of English as well as its applications for language teaching and testing. In addition, they will get hands-on experience of working with linguistic databases, applying corpus methodology as well as doing qualitative analysis of interaction. Course format and teaching methods Lectures, language labs, discussions, group work, mini-research studies, exercises and tasks, field work, final group project presentation Teachers and lecturers Prof. Anna Mauranen is one of the pioneers of ELF research and director of the ELFA project (English as a lingua franca in academic settings; www.helsinki.fi/elfa). She is currently serving as vice-rector of the University of Helsinki. Her 2012 book, Exploring ELF: academic English shaped by non-native speakers (Cambridge University Press), analyses the ELFA corpus of spoken academic ELF and provides the theoretical foundations for the course. Dr. Svetlana Vetchinnikova is a post-doctoral researcher in the Changing English project at the University of Helsinki. Her work centres on language patterning at different planes of its organisation and the underlying processing mechanisms, especially in second language users. Dr. Jaana Suviniitty is an educational developer at Aalto University School of Science. Her research has focused on the comprehensibility of lectures in academic ELF settings and the pedagogical implications of academic ELF research. Ray Carey, MA is a PhD student in the ELFA project and currently compiling a new corpus of written academic ELF, the WrELFA corpus, under the direction of Anna Mauranen. His research interests focus on the linear modelling of language and describing fluency in academic ELF interactions. He maintains the ELFA project research blog. Means and criteria of assessment Pass/fail on the basis of attendance, active participation, project work (case studies in groups), final group project presentation. [-]

ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT

Campus Full time 17 days August 2017 Finland Helsinki

This course is designed for students who are interested in environmental and ethical issues. It is recommended for undergraduate students of philosophy, social sciences, sociology, environmental studies, politics and economics. Previous studies in Philosophy and/or Ethics may be helpful but are not required. [+]

PLEASE NOTE! This course was held in 2015, new courses will be arranged in 2017 Target Students This course is designed for students who are interested in environmental and ethical issues. It is recommended for undergraduate students of philosophy, social sciences, sociology, environmental studies, politics and economics. Previous studies in Philosophy and/or Ethics may be helpful but are not required. Synopsis This course is an introduction to environmental ethics as a philosophical discipline helpful to analysing environmental case studies. It aims to raise awareness about the fundamental and ethical role of the natural environment in human life. The theoretical part of the course introduces ethical theories and concepts, while a more practical section presents real case studies and ethical notions from different viewpoints. Why is ethics important in the modern world and why should ethics be part of policy-making processes? In an attempt to answer such questions, this course will discuss ethical concepts – such as intrinsic and instrumental value, anthropocentrism and ecocentrism, and concern for future generations – together with different types of Environmental Ethics theories – such as Deep Ecology, Ecofeminism, Land Ethics, Utilitarianism, Gaia Theory and Animal Rights. The applicability of different ethical theories will be tested in light of selected case studies about natural disasters and environmental accidents, including the catastrophic failure at the Fukushima nuclear power plant on 11 March 2011 in Japan; hydraulic fracturing, commonly known as “fracking”; the unfair polluting policy of TEXACO (now Chevron) in the Ecuadorian Amazon and many others. Tools and concepts which do not primarily belong to the ethical field such as the Free Rider, the Tragedy of the Commons, homo economicus and the Comedy of the Commons will be presented as helpful instruments for ethical deliberations. Learning objectives This course attempts to give students the analytical apparatus to critically analyse the role played by the natural environment in the life of humans and other living species. The course familiarises the students with basic concepts and theories of Environmental Ethics, fostering an understanding on how human factors weigh and carry responsibility for environmental problems. The students will be trained to see different perspectives, to apply moral theories and draw ethical conclusions from real-life cases in recent news. This enables the students to confront their views in class debates, to better understand themselves and colleagues, and to improve their skills of discussion, argumentation, group work and presentation. Course format and teaching methods Lectures, group work, screening of scenes from documentary films and discussions will take place during the class. Small group tasks are designed to acquaint the students with ethical concepts and theories, and apply them to natural disasters and environmental case studies. Teachers and lecturers The course is led by Corinna Casi, PhD student in Environmental Ethics, Department of Political and Economic Studies (Social and Moral Philosophy), Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Helsinki. Corinna Casi graduated with a Master’s thesis in Moral Philosophy at the University of Bologna, Italy. She is currently living in Finland and working on her doctoral research at the University of Helsinki, focusing on Applied Ethics and environmental non-economic value. In 2013, she was visiting lecturer in Reykjavik where she taught a course on Applied Ethics at the University of Iceland. In 2014 she was visiting lecturer at the University of Latvia in Riga. She is also teaching Environmental Ethics at the Tampere University of Applied Sciences, Finland Means and criteria of assessment The student’s work is evaluated on a scale 0–5 and will be the outcome of different assignments: 1) Presentation in class: 15 min. presentation + 10 min. discussion (35%) 2) Several individual and group assignments during the course (40%) 3) Personal applied project (15%) 4) Attendance and active participation in class (10%) More instructions will be given during the first class. Grading scale: 5 = excellent 4 = very good 3 = good 2 = average 1 = poor 0 = fail. [-]

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF CATCHMENT FROM HEADWATERS TO THE SEA

Campus Full time 17 days August 2017 Finland Helsinki

Bachelor or master level students having basic knowledge in ecology, environmental or aquatic sciences. [+]

PLEASE NOTE! This course was held in 2015, new courses will be arranged in 2017 Target group Bachelor or master level students having basic knowledge in ecology, environmental or aquatic sciences. Synopsis This course introduces students to the overall picture of environmental impact on the Baltic Sea. It will do so by analysing the role of catchment area and inland waters in the water quality and eutrophication of coastal waters. During the intensive field course the students will learn how land management, control of water pollution and ambient ecosystem dynamics affect water quality and ecosystems and how this changes on the way from headwaters along the river basin to the Baltic Sea. The course will give a deeper understanding of the nutrient processes and their spatial and temporal dynamics in catchments and coastal areas, including transportation, modification and retention of nutrients and organic material. Learning objectives After completing the course, the students have knowledge of different Finnish freshwater ecosystems from headwaters to coastal waters of the Baltic Sea. Students will have gained insights into how the land use in catchment areas affects the freshwater quality and biology. They will also have learned basic sampling and analytical methods used in freshwater ecology Course format and teaching methods The course contains lectures, excursions, fieldwork, group work and some laboratory work with water analyses. Excursions are made to different kinds of inland and coastal water bodies. Course readings Articles will be handed out during the course. Teachers and lecturers The course is led by Dr Eeva Einola, researcher at Lammi Biological Station and Dr Marko Reinikainen, researcher at Tvärminne Zoological Station. Lectures and coursework are given by several researchers working on aquatic sciences at the University of Helsinki. See preliminary course programme for 2015 for examples. Means and criteria of assessment Assessment is based on class participation and activity, group exercises and on completed personal essay. Students are divided into 4–5 groups. Items for group exercises and for personal essay are given during the Viikki Campus period. Syntheses of group exercises are presented at the stations. Assessment: participation during lectures and fieldwork 40%, group exercise 40% and essay 20%. Grading scale: 5 = excellent 4 = very good 3 = good 2 = average 1 = poor 0 = fail. [-]

GAMES AND HISTORY

Campus Full time 17 days August 2017 Finland Helsinki

The course is designed for all interested students with some previous studies in History. It is recommended for students in their third year or beyond. [+]

PLEASE NOTE! This course was held in 2015, new courses will be arranged in 2017 Target students The course is designed for all interested students with some previous studies in History. It is recommended for students in their third year or beyond. It also rather requires that the participants have a certain amount of experience from video games, organised role playing and/or board games (such as dealing with rule books, using game interfaces, grids or network providers [e.g. STEAM], and familiarity with basic structures and options of video games.) Students’ access to one or more games on the STEAM or some other game platform during the course is a necessity. Sufficient digital resources will be arranged for the students to be able to do the course assignments Synopsis This course takes a look at the continuously evolving field of games from a historian’s viewpoint. Working with lectures, workshops and student presentations, it examines games as design, historiography, teaching aids and elements of historical consciousness. The aims of the course are threefold. First, to provide the participants a basic cultural history of board and video games, as related to concepts found in modern Game Studies. Second, to present and discuss historical culture, images and presence in modern video and tabletop games. And third, to provide participants with ideas and tools for analysing, planning, producing and understanding historical interpretations and representations in the world of games. The final part of the course consists of a seminar where participants will present a team work paper on some related game or subject for public dissemination. Learning objectives The students will learn how games have developed in history, the concepts of game studies, how modern game design works, how to assess historicity in games, how to analyse relevant games as a form of historical communication, and how to utilise games in education as a form of historiography. The course does not as such deal with sports games, children’s games, card games or gambling, but rather contemplates the researched historical contents in games, the choices made by the game designers, the possible educational aspects (conscious or not), the style and the ambiance present, and the recent trends in video and tabletop games somehow displaying elements of historical recreation, rendition or education. Please note that when dealing with video games, the course will focus on the PC platform instead of the world of consoles. Course format and teaching methods Lectures, demonstrations, board game workshops, and seminars with the team-working students presenting a study and dissemination on a set game or some related subject. The format will require students to access games and work on their assignments outside of the common lectures and workshops. If possible, the course will make 1–2 shorter excursions within Helsinki to relevant localities directly after the lectures. Teachers and lecturers The course is led by Dr Derek Fewster, University Lecturer in History, University of Helsinki. Dr Fewster is a specialist in questions related to historical culture, cultural studies, public uses of history, nationalism and the history of ideas. Two or three guest lecturers are to be confirmed. Means and criteria of assessment 1. Participation during lectures (20%). 2. A submitted and evaluated case study for the seminars, presented as a team work of two or three cooperating students. Each group will thus both submit a written text/powerpoint (30%) and give a 20–30-minute presentation of the game (30%). 3. A written report from the board game sessions (10%). 4. An individually submitted free essay of at least 8000 characters (ca. 3 pages), discussing personal reflections on the subject of “Games and History” in relation to the readings and lessons presented (10%). Grading scale: 5 = excellent 4 = very good 3 = good 2 = average 1 = poor 0 = fail. All of the written assignments of 2–4 must be submitted for a passed result. An attendace rate of at least 80% of the lectures and seminars is also required. [-]

GENDER, CULTURE AND POLITICS

Campus Full time 17 days August 2017 Finland Helsinki

This course is an overview of Finnish gender studies today, both in the humanities and the social sciences. As such, the course also provides insights into contemporary society, dealing with representations of gender, Finnish research on gendered power, normativity and intersectionality. Also addressed will be global equality questions and multicultural issues in Finnish and partly in a Scandinavian/northern European context. [+]

PLEASE NOTE! This course was held in 2015, new courses will be arranged in 2017 Target students Advanced Bachelor’s and Master’s level students. Previous studies in multidisciplinary gender studies are recommended, but are not obligatory. Synopsis This course is an overview of Finnish gender studies today, both in the humanities and the social sciences. As such, the course also provides insights into contemporary society, dealing with representations of gender, Finnish research on gendered power, normativity and intersectionality. Also addressed will be global equality questions and multicultural issues in Finnish and partly in a Scandinavian/northern European context. Structure The course is divided into various themes examined in daily lectures (2 hours) and group discussions and/or excursions. The course explores such cultural topics as representations of gender, normativity, emotions, media and representations, fashion, home and domesticity, consumption and gender, and sex and public space. Political/societal questions include gender and nation, gendered citizenship, silenced history of colonialisation, and gender equality as an export product. A key part of the course is intersectionality as both a method and a subject. The course also highlights the significance of dealing with theories and practical examples and questions. For each theme the students will read academic texts and other material available on the internet and discuss them in groups. The course will be assisted by designated tutors from the Helsinki-based Gender Studies Master’s Programme. The students will use the Moodle learning environment for pre-assignments and the learning diary. Additional activities will be provided together with the Hilma network, a University Network on Gender Studies in Finland. Learning objectives To gain insights into Finnish society, equality questions of the Finnish welfare state and representations of gender. To learn about Finnish research on gender and gendered power, normativity and intersectionality. To work as a group in analysing texts and in assignments guided by practices of feminist pedagogy. To learn new methods such as taking part in a group exam. Course format and teaching methods Lectures, group discussions, tutored groups with Finnish Gender Studies students. Additional activities and excursions will be arranged with the Hilma network, such as visiting Finnish equality authorities and women’s movement associations, and getting acquainted with multicultural feminism. Teachers and lecturers Dr Annamari Vänskä (Collegium Researcher, Turku Institute for Advanced Studies, University of Turku) Dr Marjaana Jauhola (Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Helsinki Guest lecturers Means and criteria of assessment Class participation, group work and excursions, and group exam. Exam grading scale: 5 = excellent 4 = very good 3 = good 2 = average 1 = poor 0 = fail. • Participation during lectures and in-class assignments (20%) • Case studies (20%) • Group exercise (30%) • Learning diary (30%) [-]

GLOBALISATION, MEDIA AND THE COSMOPOLITAN CITIZEN

Campus Full time 17 days August 2017 Finland Helsinki

Advanced, third-year undergraduate students in communication / social sciences / politics / media / journalism. [+]

PLEASE NOTE! This course was held in 2015, new courses will be arranged in 2017 Target Students Advanced, third-year undergraduate students in communication / social sciences / politics / media / journalism. Synopsis This course critically interrogates common understandings of globalisation (of our own as well as of others). We start from the idea that, even though there are clearly actual material processes of globalisation with real and far-reaching consequences, globalisation is also a word that is used in a variety of ways by a variety of actors to represent these processes in different manners (Fairclough 2006: 4). To better understand the ways in which the use of this word impacts on our understanding of what globalisation is we first discuss the many academic understandings of globalisation and the discourse on the cosmopolitan citizen. We then hone in on nation branding: a specific attempt to our understanding of the global world. We analyse the campaign of national (non)governmental organisations that provide a particular image of nations, contrasting these academic and mediated organisational discourses with everyday stories of globalisation: what does it mean to live in a ‘global’ city? Observations and interviews with different people – those living in rural areas or in the capital city, and natives and those living as migrants or expats – will give us alternative views of globalisation. It will also allow us to counter the dominant representations. Learning objectives The students will have three types of skills on completion of the module: Intellectual skills •You will have acquired a critical awareness of the academic theory on globalisation (assignments 2–3) and will be able to reflect on the way in which globalisation is represented on various levels (assignments 1, 4 and 5). •You will have skills that enable you to analyse nation branding (assignment 4) and the everyday representations by different actors (assignment 5). Practical skills •You will be able to critically engage with academic work on globalisation and understand how globalisation is both a process and a word (assignments 2 and 3); •You will be able to conduct empirical research to analyse the discourse on globalisation as represented by a variety of actors (conducting interviews, observations and discourse analysis of nation-branding campaigns and interview material) – as shown in your assignments, engagement in group discussions and visual presentation; •You will be able to present your research in a clear, concise and visually attractive manner in in-class presentations (assignments 4 and 5); •You will be able to produce a professional visual design for the presentation of your research findings on the last day of the module (assignment 5). Transferable skills •You will be able to discuss your ideas about globalisation in front of your peers as part of the seminars; •You will be able to work effectively in groups as part of the group work; •You will develop basic research and academic skills which you will demonstrate in your individual and group assignments. Course format and teaching methods Interactive lectures, seminar discussion, teaching labs, workshops; guided group work; self-study. Course readings TBA Teachers and lecturers Dr. Tamara Witschge, University of Groningen Means and criteria of assessment By 31 July 2015: Assignment 1: 400-word autobiography, 10% of overall grade 5 August 2015: Assignment 2: 250-word literature review, 10% 6 August 2015: Assignment 3: 250-word literature review, 10% 14 August 2015: Assignment 4: individual 15-minute oral presentation and handout including theoretical and methodological reflections on findings, 40% 20 August 2015: Assignment 5: 15-minute oral group presentation, combined with findings and reflections in visual form chosen by group (brochure, handout, poster, powerpoint, etc.), 30% [-]

HEAVY METAL MUSIC IN CONTEMPORARY HISTORY AND SOCIETY

Campus Full time 17 days August 2017 Finland Helsinki

The course aims to be as multidisciplinary as possible, encouraging collaboration between students from different academic backgrounds. The ideal candidates are advanced Bachelor’s or Master’s students of musical practice, musicology, social studies, history, semiotics, cultural studies, anthropology, philosophy, psychology, language studies, gender studies and pedagogy. Familiarity with music theory is considered an asset, but it is not mandatory. The teaching methods involve team-working within the class, so that single disciplinary gaps can be amended by cooperation. The course will be divided into groups of 4–6 students at the beginning of the course, so that the groups will have a range of competences. [+]

PLEASE NOTE! This course was held in 2015, new courses will be arranged in 2017 Target students The course aims to be as multidisciplinary as possible, encouraging collaboration between students from different academic backgrounds. The ideal candidates are advanced Bachelor’s or Master’s students of musical practice, musicology, social studies, history, semiotics, cultural studies, anthropology, philosophy, psychology, language studies, gender studies and pedagogy. Familiarity with music theory is considered an asset, but it is not mandatory. The teaching methods involve team-working within the class, so that single disciplinary gaps can be amended by cooperation. The course will be divided into groups of 4–6 students at the beginning of the course, so that the groups will have a range of competences. Synopsis This course explores the development of the popular music style of Heavy Metal. The primary focus will be on the history of the genre and its importance in contemporary western society. Much attention will be on Finland, where HM is particularly successful and characterises musical culture more than in other European or non-European countries. Learning objectives The students will appreciate the importance of Heavy Metal music in western musical culture, its historical development and the characteristics of the subculture related to the music. This subculture is particularly strong in Finland, and Finnish HM is recognised worldwide as a key manifestation of this musical style. The students will also achieve competences in music critique, musical theory, the sociology of music, music semiotics and cultural studies. Furthermore, the course gives them a solid basis to critically understand popular music genres other than HM. Course format and teaching methods Lectures, multimedia material (musical examples, films, documentaries), workshop/seminar activities, group discussions. Classes take place five days a week, from Monday to Friday. During the lectures (provisionally 9.00–11.00), the teacher addresses the history of HM and its interaction with society and other fields of culture. The teaching methods are: Reading and commenting on course material (e.g. books, articles), or commenting on previously assigned readings. Viewing/listening and commenting on multimedia material. After the lunch break, the course continues with workshop/seminar activities focused on group work (provisionally at 12.00–14.00). This includes: Analysis of readings and audio/video examples about specific topics proposed by the teacher. The group work results in writings or slide presentations to be discussed in front of the class. Assignments outside the classes are meant to be worked on mainly in teams. Some seminar meetings with musicians or experts in the field of HM studies (see ‘Lecturers and teachers’). Once/twice (max.): attendance in the evening at a medium/major HM concert. This is subject to events taking place in Helsinki at the time and on the ticket price (roughly €15–30). Teachers and lecturers The course is held by PhD candidate Paolo Ribaldini, University of Helsinki, whose research topic is HM music, and whose educational background involves classical and popular music practice, musicology, philosophy, and philosophy of music. Means and criteria of assessment Attendance at lectures 20%. Participation in seminars, group work 40%. Final essay/exam 40%. At the end of the course, the students are required to write a short essay (3000–5000 words) about a topic chosen from a list of options (6–10) given by the teacher. For those students who prefer an alternative option, the essay can be replaced by a written exam on one of the days of the course. The number of credits is counted as follows: 4 hrs classes x 5 days/week x 3 weeks = 60 hrs about 2 hrs individual/group work outside classes x 5 days/week x 3 weeks = 30 hrs preliminary readings and final essay = about 45 hrs TOTAL = 135 hrs (5 ETCS, if 1 ECTS = 27 hrs work) [-]

INTENSIVE FINNISH COURSE

Campus Full time 17 days August 2017 Finland Helsinki

This course is only for international students beginning their master’s degree studies in the autumn of 2015 at the University of Helsinki. If you do not fulfill this criteria but wish to learn Finnish, please have a look here for other Finnish courses offered by the University of Helsinki. [+]

PLEASE NOTE! This course was held in 2015, new courses will be arranged in 2017 Target students This course is only for international students beginning their master’s degree studies in the autumn of 2015 at the University of Helsinki. If you do not fulfill this criteria but wish to learn Finnish, please have a look here for other Finnish courses offered by the University of Helsinki. Synopsis This intensive basic course in Finnish offers incoming students the opportunity to study the Finnish language before the beginning of the University’s autumn term. The course includes 50 hours of teaching plus independent/group work (six hours of study a day on average). Before the course begins, the participants are expected to take the online course Tavataan taas! Finnish for Foreigners, so that they will learn the basic vocabulary and grammar as well as various phrases and elements of Finnish culture and society. The online course provides help in English and other languages in addition to Finnish. Learning objective The course offers incoming students the opportunity to begin studying the Finnish language before the University’s autumn term begins, so that it will be possible to continue with Suomi 2 courses in the autumn at the University of Helsinki. The aim is to learn to cope with simple everyday discussions, write brief texts on familiar topics and learn key vocabulary. The target level is A1.2. Course format and teaching methods The course consists of four contact lessons daily, and the students work in small groups/independently in the afternoons. This way the course learning objectives can be attained. The students are expected to participate actively in the various tasks and group work during the contact lessons. The online platform Moodle may be used for mixed mode activities (mainly independent work). The course is taught in Finnish, which allows students to use the language straight away. The Finnish in Finnish method has been proven to accelerate and enhance learning; the course has been designed so that no other languages are needed. Nevertheless, students can always ask for help in other languages when the teachers are circulating in class supervising pair or group work, during breaks or after class. Course readings Please purchase the book before the first lessons: “Suomen mestari 1. Suomen kielen oppikirja aikuisille” by Sanni Heinzmann, Sonja Gehring. Finn Lectura. Chapters 1–7. Additional material (handouts) by the teacher. Course teacher Päivi Vetsch, MA, University Instructor Means and criteria of assessment Written test at the end of the course, assessed on the scale 0–5 (0=fail, 1=passable, 2=satisfactory, 3=good, 4=very good, 5=excellent). Oral skills are assessed continuously during the course. The end-of-course written test can be retaken once. The participants will receive a certificate stating the contents and the level of the course. [-]

INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION AND MULTILINGUALISM

Campus Full time 17 days August 2017 Finland Helsinki

This course is suitable for Bachelor’s and Master’s level students interested in interculturality. Suitable academic backgounds include anthropology, social sciences, social psychology, psychology, postcolonial studies, linguistics, area and cultural studies and communication. [+]

PLEASE NOTE! This course was held in 2015, new courses will be arranged in 2017 Target students This course is suitable for Bachelor’s and Master’s level students interested in interculturality. Suitable academic backgounds include anthropology, social sciences, social psychology, psychology, postcolonial studies, linguistics, area and cultural studies and communication. Synopsis What is meant by Intercultural Communication? What are the contexts in which Intercultural Communication typically occurs and what are its distinguishing features? Which factors contribute to success or failure in Intercultural Communication? Taking questions such as these as points of departure, the course addresses its themes from a sociolinguistic perspective. These themes are linked by the key concepts of ‘language’, ‘society’ and ‘difference’ which are central in considering matters of misunderstanding vs success in intercultural communication. The course will focus on Intercultural Communication theories and models, and will also examine multilingualism by giving examples from different geographical areas. The participants will analyse multilingualism, bilingualism and the media by using critical discourse analysis. Learning objectives •To become familiar with Intercultural Communication as a field of study •To gain insights into the link between intercultural communication and multilingualism •To gain insights into various features of language which aid or obstruct intercultural communication •To better understand the sociolinguistics aspects of intercultural communication •To better understand the role of language in communicating across social barriers of class, ethnic group, gender, nationality, etc. Course format and teaching methods The course starts with introductory lectures on how different themes and disciplinary perspectives come together in Intercultural Communication. The course material incorporates findings of foundational and recent academic research in the field. Before the start of the course, selected readings will be made available to students electronically. Working in groups, students will investigate concrete examples of intercultural communication and use critical discourse analysis as a method. Students will report their findings in formal presentations to be discussed by fellow students and assessed by the course teacher. Lecturer Professor Christine Anthonissen, Stellenbosch University, South Africa Anthonissen received her PhD at the University of Vienna in 2001, working on Critical Discourse Analysis as a Critical Theory that developed during the 1970s. She specifically considered how such theory could be used in analysing media discourses produced under constraints of strict state censorship. Her current research focuses on Discourse Studies, Critical Discourse Analysis and social aspects of Bilingualism and Multilingualism. This work topicalises discourses of coming to terms with a traumatic past, including discourses produced during the hearings of the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission, and language discordant discourses between health workers and patients in HIV/AIDS clinics. She has undertaken an interdisciplinary project that investigates characteristics of language shift from Afrikaans to English in a number of Western Cape communities, tracing the nature of the language choices made in personal and private contexts and in various public domains. She is one of the editors of Stellenbosch Papers in Linguistics (SPIL and SPIL PLUS), and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Language and Politics; and Multilingual Margins. The course coordinator is Saara Rautanen-Uunila. Please direct any questions concerning the content of this course to her at saara.rautanen-uunila(at)helsinki.fi. Means and criteria of assessment Active participation in lectures, assignments and group work presentations. [-]

INTRODUCTION TO BIOETHICS

Campus Full time 17 days August 2017 Finland Helsinki

Introduction to Bioethics is designed for Bachelor’s, Master’s and doctoral students who can tie in bioethics with their primary field of study, such as philosophy, theology, ethics, medicine, biosciences, law or adjacent fields. [+]

PLEASE NOTE! This course was held in 2015, new courses will be arranged in 2017 Target students Introduction to Bioethics is designed for Bachelor’s, Master’s and doctoral students who can tie in bioethics with their primary field of study, such as philosophy, theology, ethics, medicine, biosciences, law or adjacent fields. Synopsis Research on biosciences and biotechnologies has evolved vastly during the past decades. Biosciences and their novel applications now have an enormous impact on society in shaping our understanding of life, death, sickness, health and environmental sustainability. This course engages with the philosophical study of the ethical controversies brought about by advances in biology and medicine. The students will be introduced to the history of bioethics; to the role of various theories and approaches; to medical, environmental and technological ethics; and to ethical questions related to novel biotechnologies. The course will also probe into biolaw and its developments. Learning objectives The course will give an overview of the development of bioethics, as well as different theoretical approaches and examples of practical problems within the field. Case studies give an opportunity to analyse and formulate arguments in favour of and against different types of solutions, highlighting the complexity of bioethical problems. Course format and teaching methods The course consists of lectures, case-based workshops, readings and a study journal that will be completed during the course. Prior to the course, students will write an orientation paper on a bioethical issue. These essays will be discussed in a workshop examining the state of bioethical discussion in the participants’ countries. Teachers and lecturers Jaana Hallamaa, Ville Päivänsalo, Janne Nikkinen, Eeva Nyrövaara, Juli Mansnérus, Susanne Uusitalo, Riitta Burrell, Johanna Ahola-Launonen, Pekka Louhiala, Heikki Saxén, Pinja Jaspers, Salla Saxén, C. Aludaat-Dujardin, Topi Heikkerö, Karoliina Snell and Karoliina Nikula. Means and criteria of assessment Learning diary of 20 pages based on literature and lectures and integrated in each participant’s field of study. Assessment criteria: formulation of relevant questions, use of material, critical thinking, conceptual clarity. [-]

MANAGING SUSTAINABLE FOREST LANDSCAPES

Campus Full time 17 days August 2017 Finland Helsinki

This course examines forestry from an interdisciplinary and global perspective. The focus will be on ecosystem services that forests provide, and the students should therefore have at least a basic understanding of ecosystem functions. Advanced Master’s or Doctoral degree students are warmly invited on this course as are young professionals in a field related to the topics covered. [+]

PLEASE NOTE! This course was held in 2015, new courses will be arranged in 2017 Target students This course examines forestry from an interdisciplinary and global perspective. The focus will be on ecosystem services that forests provide, and the students should therefore have at least a basic understanding of ecosystem functions. Advanced Master’s or Doctoral degree students are warmly invited on this course as are young professionals in a field related to the topics covered. Synopsis This course seeks to enhance our understanding of forest ecosystem services, not least as the future of global forest resources is a daily concern in international policy debate and processes. International and national initiatives need to be strengthened to sustain the economic potential of forest landscapes under increasing pressure from population growth. In addition, new challenges such as adaptation to uncertain climatic conditions, competing land uses as well as concerns about food security and biofuels are examples of major problems faced every day by forest-dependent communities and decision makers worldwide. All these drivers of change call for integrated and multidisciplinary approaches to incorporate landscape management in a way that both encourages immediate innovative action and sets targets for finding sustainable solutions. Forests and industrial plantations have become an important part of the global natural resource puzzle. A broader framework should thus include flexible management schemes to allow for effective participation of local communities, and the establishment of cost-efficient production systems (e.g. plantations, agroforestry), which can generate an adequate flow of commercial products, ecosystems services and livelihood improvements. For a functional framework, however, international and national initiatives for good governance, transparency, efficiency and equity must be integrated into the planning process. It is the complex web of interrelated issues that this course brings to the fore. Learning objectives The objective of this intensive course is to provide learning tools and methods to analyse and identify opportunities for and threats to forest landscapes, which raise multiple expectations and perform a range of functions. Course format and teaching methods The course consists of: 1. a pre-course examination 2. lectures and reflection exercises on the lectures 3. excursions/field trips 4. group work 5. public seminar, and 6. informal programme such as games, documentaries and drama sessions. The learning method is interactive, focusing on discussion and creative participation. Teachers and lecturers The course is led by Prof. Markku Kanninen, University of Helsinki and Viikki Tropical Resources Institute and is co-ordinated by Mr. Saska Lohi. The teaching will be given by the various experts from different organisations in the public, private and civil sectors. Means and criteria of assessment a. Pre-exam: 20% of final score b. Reflection exercise: 40% of final score c. Group report and presentation: 40% of final score d. Excursion to Finnish institutions: no effect on final score e. Exercises: no effect on final score. Additional information: a. All assignments listed on the course requirements are compulsory for all students. In order to pass the course, receive the ECTS and the final diploma, students must successfully complete all assignments and activities; b. If students miss a class, they must write an essay on the same subject for every missed lecture, exercise session or institutional visit. This written essay consists of one full A4 page (12-size font, 1.5 space, Times New Roman, about 600 words). Grading scale: 5 = excellent 4 = very good 3 = good 2 = average 1 = poor 0 = fail. [-]

MUSEUMS AND MEMORIAL SITES: DISPLAYING AND REMEMBERING MINORITIES

Campus Full time 17 days August 2017 Finland Helsinki

Advanced students and junior researchers in history, ethnology, anthropology, gender studies and museums studies as well as current museums staff are invited to participate. Participants from a minority background are especially encouraged to attend. [+]

PLEASE NOTE! This course was held in 2015, new courses will be arranged in 2017 Target students Advanced students and junior researchers in history, ethnology, anthropology, gender studies and museums studies as well as current museums staff are invited to participate. Participants from a minority background are especially encouraged to attend. Synopsis The objective of this multidisciplinary course is to teach how different minorities have been taken into consideration in museums and memorials and to advance the students’ understanding and sensitivity in minority issues in this respect. Minority as a term can be based on ethnicity, race, gender, health or sexual orientation. The course will address how a negative past and loss, such as the Holocaust or everyday discrimination, have been and can be displayed and commemorated, making the agency of display the core concept in the history of museum exhibitions and memorials. The course will also deal with the accessibility of memorials and exhibitions of/for people with disabilities, e.g. people with a visual impairment. This Summer School course provides an opportunity for advanced students and junior researchers to explore complex issues with such prominent experts as Odd Brantenberg (Tromsø University Museum), Nataša Jovičić (Director of the Jasenovac Memorial Site), Kristin Kuutma (University of Tartu), Léontine Meijer-van Mensch (Deputy Director at Museum Europäischer Kulturen, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin – Preußischer Kulturbesitz), Ulla-Maija Peltonen (Finnish Literature Society) and Susanna Pettersson (Director at Ateneum Art Museum/the Finnish National Gallery). Partner of this course is Mémorial de la Shoah, Paris. The students will make a full-day excursion to Estonia as part of the course. Additional excursion fee approximately 50€. Learning objectives After taking the course, the students will be critically aware of historical aspects in museum display policies and questions of heritage. Participants will be familiar with the key concepts, theories and practical approaches in the field as well as with the professional dilemmas and needs of policy makers. Course readings The course includes obligatory core reading (5 research articles) and a wide thematic syllabus of suggested reading. Obligatory reading: Kuutma, Kristin: “Cultural Heritage: An introduction to Entanglements of Knowledge, Politics and Property”, Journal of Ethnology and Folkloristics 3 (2), 2009, 5-12; Kirchenblatt-Gimblett, Barbara, “Destination Culture: Tourism, Museums, and Heritage”, University of California Press 1998, 17-78; Stone, Dan: “Memory, Memorials and Museums”, Dan Stone (ed.): The Historiography of the Holocaust, Palgrave Macmillan, 2004, 508-532; Bendix, Regina: “Heritage Between Economy and Politics. An Assessment from the Perspective of Cultural Anthropology”, Laurajane Smith & Natsuko Akagawa (eds.): Intangible Heritage, Routledge, 2009, 253-269; Léontine Meijer-van Mensch and Peter van Mensch: Proud to be Dutch? Intangible Heritage and National Identity in the Netherlands. Page 125-136. Teachers and lecturers The course is coordinated by Dr Malte Gasche and Dr Eija Stark. Gasche ia a specialist in Holocaust and Genocide Studies and has served as an expert for the Anne Frank exhibition in Finland (2012). A researcher in folklore studies, Stark’s expertise covers the question of ownership of intangible heritage. Means and criteria of assessment The course calls for active student participation. The students should engage in an active learning process, contribute to the discussions and workshops, and complete the assignments. To receive six ECTS credits, the students must write a 10–12 page essay. For 10 ECTS credits, they must submit a 20–25 page essay. The essays must be submitted no later than one month after the conclusion of the course. [-]

SCIENCE FICTION IN LITERATURE AND CULTURE

Campus Full time 17 days August 2017 Finland Helsinki

The course is designed for advanced undergraduates in all areas of academic enquiry who have an interest in the study of Anglo-American science fiction. However, please note that as the focus is on literary and cultural studies, there is a lot of required reading and writing. We therefore expect students to be able to operate fluently in English and preferably to have experience of at least one university-level course taught entirely in English. To achieve the learning goals, students also need preliminary knowledge of basic concepts and approaches of literary criticism. Anyone with no background in these areas of study is expected to read the following book prior to the course: Peter Barry (1995) 2009. Beginning Theory: Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory, 3rd ed., Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press. [+]

PLEASE NOTE! This course was held in 2015, new courses will be arranged in 2017 Target students The course is designed for advanced undergraduates in all areas of academic enquiry who have an interest in the study of Anglo-American science fiction. However, please note that as the focus is on literary and cultural studies, there is a lot of required reading and writing. We therefore expect students to be able to operate fluently in English and preferably to have experience of at least one university-level course taught entirely in English. To achieve the learning goals, students also need preliminary knowledge of basic concepts and approaches of literary criticism. Anyone with no background in these areas of study is expected to read the following book prior to the course: Peter Barry (1995) 2009. Beginning Theory: Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory, 3rd ed., Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press. Synopsis This course offers a concise view of the birth of science fiction as a literary genre, its development and its increasingly ambitious themes which both connect with and propose to change reality. Class topics include the history and definitions of science fiction, SF in different media (TV, films, games), the relationship between SF and natural and human sciences, and the study of SF fan culture. We will also look at central themes present in contemporary science fiction: identity politics, posthumanism and postcolonialism, and focus on some of the formal ways in which SF creates its weird worlds and temporalities. Learning objectives The course aims to provide students with a general understanding of the history and specific characteristics of science fiction, as well as the effects SF has had on popular culture and cultural identities. After the course, the students can recognise and analyse the thematic and narrative functions of SF in various media, and will be able to provide a clear analysis of how these functions and their theoretical representations connect with ideas of art, society and the workings of human consciousness in specific works of science fiction. Course format and teaching methods The course includes lectures by specialists in various areas of science fiction research, and in-class discussions based on the lectures and assigned readings. In addition to class attendance, the requirements include assigned readings of science fiction novels, short stories and theoretical texts, a short pre-course assignment and a learning journal. Course readings One novel (Quantum Thief by Hannu Rajaniemi) prior to the course and several short stories and short theoretical texts during the course. The course uses The Routledge Companion to Science Fiction as its textbook, but students are not required to own a copy or to read it beforehand. Teachers and lecturers The course is led by Dr Merja Polvinen from the University of Helsinki, together with doctoral students (Jari Käkelä, Mika Loponen, Päivi Väätänen, Kaisa Kortekallio) specialising in science fiction research. Means of criteria and assessment Grading is based on active class participation and the learning journal. Grading of the learning journal will focus on: -Accuracy of the information presented (in relation to class discussions and background reading). -Application of the ideas presented in class discussions and background reading to the interpretation of the assigned texts. -Reflection on the larger implications of the ideas presented in class discussion and background reading -Reflection on the student’s own learning process during the course. Grading scale: 5 = excellent 4 = very good 3 = good 2 = average 1 = poor 0 = fail. [-]

THE WELFARE CITY

Campus Full time 17 days

The course is designed for Master’s degree students of social sciences, sociology, geography, cultural studies, architecture, urban planning, environmental studies, politics, and economics. [+]

PLEASE NOTE! This course was held in 2015, new courses will be arranged in 2017 Target students The course is designed for Master’s degree students of social sciences, sociology, geography, cultural studies, architecture, urban planning, environmental studies, politics, and economics. Synopsis This Helsinki Summer School course takes a look at the welfare city as a sustainable model of urban development. A welfare city, such as Helsinki, promotes the wellbeing of its citizens, sustains a balance between the needs of both nature and the people, and responds to social and ecological awareness alike. Or does it? The course uses lectures, workshops and excursions in Helsinki to examine what makes the Finnish capital a welfare city. Learning objectives During the three weeks of the course, the students and teachers will analyse how a welfare city works. For example, how should we organise housing, social services and urban planning in a liveable welfare city? What has design to do with it? And what helps to make this welfare city sustainable? Course format and teaching methods The course consists of lectures, workshops and excursions. Before and during the course, the students will engage in individual and group work. The interactive learning method is based on an interdisciplinary understanding of urban studies. The students are encouraged to participate actively in the development of case studies and hands-on on-site planning activities in the Helsinki region. Course readings Course readings will be distributed electronically to students in advance. The readings will introduce students to the subjects and authors to be dealt with in lectures. Some workshops will take the form of a reading circle. Teachers and lecturers The course is organised and led by Dr Giacomo Bottà, Docent (Adjunct Professor) in Urban Studies at the University of Helsinki. Other lecturers include Prof. of Urban Studies Anne Haila (University of Helsinki). The course also features leading international researchers of the field and experts from Finnish think tanks, municipalities and other institutions. Means and criteria of assessment The course consists of 1) a pre-course assignment to be completed before the beginning of the course; 2) in-course assignments including workshops, group work, writing one lecture diary and one abstract; active participation in class; and 3) final assignments: writing the final essay, and a final group presentation. [-]

UNDERSTANDING FINNISH EDUCATION: FROM MYTHS TO REALITIES

Campus Full time 17 days August 2017 Finland Helsinki

Finnish education is famous worldwide, especially thanks to the PISA tests. Thousands of specialists and students have visited the country to witness its educational ‘miracle’. This course proposes to introduce Finnish education and discuss its characteristics. By so doing the course offers a new approach to the success of Finnish education by looking at both myths and realities. The course is taught by specialists from the Department of Teacher Education, and the students will have the opportunity to visit schools and educational institutions. An original online component makes the course even more exciting. During the course the students will also follow how international and Finnish media discuss education. [+]

PLEASE NOTE! This course was held in 2015, new courses will be arranged in 2017 Target students Master’s level students from any field of research interested in learning about Finnish education. Bachelor’s level students with teacher certificate. Synopsis Finnish education is famous worldwide, especially thanks to the PISA tests. Thousands of specialists and students have visited the country to witness its educational ‘miracle’. This course proposes to introduce Finnish education and discuss its characteristics. By so doing the course offers a new approach to the success of Finnish education by looking at both myths and realities. The course is taught by specialists from the Department of Teacher Education, and the students will have the opportunity to visit schools and educational institutions. An original online component makes the course even more exciting. During the course the students will also follow how international and Finnish media discuss education. Preliminary programme The Finnish system of education Finnish national core curriculum and current reform Teacher Education Assessing or not? Promoting school-industry or school-local Enterprise connections Multicultural education in Finland The use of technology in Finnish education PISA: For or against? Finnish Education export Learning objectives to discuss the myths and realities of Finnish education to learn about the characteristics of Finnish education and compare with other systems of education to review critically international educational rankings to become aware of the diversity of practices and contexts within Finnish education Course format and teaching methods Lectures, discussions, visits and online work. Teachers and lecturers Fred Dervin, Professor of multicultural education, Department of Teacher Education, University of Helsinki Sirkku Kupiainen, Researcher, Department of Teacher Education, University of Helsinki Heidi Layne, Researcher, Department of Teacher Education, University of Helsinki Katriina Maaranen, Senior Lecturer, Department of Teacher Education, University of Helsinki Veijo Meisalo, Professor, Department of Teacher Education, University of Helsinki Matti Meri, Professor, Department of Teacher Education, University of Helsinki Martina Paatela-Nieminen, Senior Lecturer, Adjunct professor, Department of Teacher Education, University of Helsinki Nina Saajaniemi, Adjunct Professor, Principal Investigator, University Lecturer Neuropsychologist, Department of Teacher Education, University of Helsinki Means and criteria of assessment Participation during lectures and in-class assignments (20%) Portfolio (learning diary, online discussions) (40%) Final essay (40%) [-]