Course in Pilot Training in Illinois in USA

See Course Studies in Pilot Training 2017 in Illinois in USA

Pilot Training

A course is the study of a particular topic within a wider subject area and is the foundation of a qualification. A typical course includes lectures, assessments and tutorials.

Pilot training is a challenging, yet incredibly rewarding process of becoming a successful pilot. The aviation industry continues to grow rapidly, meaning there is a large demand for pilots with this extensive training. Those who have completed pilot training and have acquired a license will have a variety of jobs to choose from.

The USA remains the world’s most popular destination for international students. Universities in the US dominate the world rankings and the country also offers a wide variety of exciting study locations. State university systems are partially subsidized by state governments, and may have many campuses spread around the state, with hundreds of thousands of students.

The State of Illinois ranks as the fifth most populous state in the U.S. Nicknamed as the Land of Lincoln the state is highly prosperous hosting a large number of industries, attractions and sites. Besides being home to one of the world’s busiest airports, the state has numerous institutions highly ranked worldwide. The University of Chicago, ranks among the top 10 in the world.

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Private Pilot Certification

Institute of Aviation at Parkland College
Campus Full time 2 years February 2017 USA Champaign

Associate degree students will sequentially earn the private pilot certificate, instrument rating, commercial pilot certificate, and multiengine rating during the program. There is also the opportunity to earn flight instructor certificates for airplane, instrument, and multiengine. [+]

Course Studies in Pilot Training in Illinois in USA. Overview The Institute of Aviation at Parkland College maintains a high level of quality in order to ensure the best outcomes for students. Located in Champaign, Illinois and with the help of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Frasca International, the Institute of Aviation at Parkland College is a leading collegiate flight school in Illinois and the only higher education institution in central Illinois with an aviation program. Located at Willard Airport, approximately eight miles from Parkland College’s main campus, the Institute of Aviation facility houses classrooms, student offices, various flight simulators, and air fleet. The fleet consists of 17 single engine Piper archers, seven Piper Arrows, three multi-engine Piper Seminoles and two Cessna 152s. Career Outlook With the impending influx of pilot retirements coupled with global growth in the aviation industry, there is a shortage of qualified pilots in the U.S. and internationally. In fact, according to Aviation Week, more than 20,000 pilot jobs are expected to open within the next seven years and these are conservative estimates. These jobs needs to be filled in order to ensure that smaller regional airlines can continue to offer service. It is argued that now maybe the best time to pursue and obtain your pilot education and flight training. Parkland’s Aviation Program The Institute of Aviation at Parkland offers an associate’s degree in aviation as well as opportunities for certification as a private pilot, instrument-rated pilot, commercial pilot, multiengine-rated pilot, and flight instructor. The associate’s degree prepares students to transfer to a four-year institution to earn a bachelor’s degree. Associate degree students will sequentially earn the private pilot certificate, instrument rating, commercial pilot certificate, and multiengine rating during the program. There is also the opportunity to earn flight instructor certificates for airplane, instrument, and multiengine. Graduates may enter the workforce upon graduation in jobs such as aerial photography and flight instruction. After completing FAA flight time requirements, graduates will be qualified to become airline pilots. Program Structure For most aviation courses, students meet for approximately two hours a week in a classroom where they will learn about aircraft systems, rules and regulations, and aviation fundamentals. Students also meet at Willard Airport for three 2-hour flight periods a week where they receive hands-on experience flying an aircraft to learn flight maneuvers, takeoffs and landings, and cross-country flight. Aviation courses are offered Fall, Spring and Summer semesters accordingly. Program Entry Requirements TSA requirements for all non- U.S. citizens The U.S. Transportation Security Administration (TSA) requires non-citizens to participate in the Alien Flight Student Program (AFSP). Visit the TSA website for more information. Non-native speakers of English All students who are non-native speakers of English must establish English language proficiency through TOEFL (iBt) scores: overall 85 or higher with minimum 22 listening and minimum 26 speaking. No alternative means of assessment is accepted. TOEFL scores must not be more than two years old from start of program. 
Medical Exam Before enrolling and flying an aircraft, students will need to obtain an aviation medical certificate from an FAA-certified aviation medical examiner (AME). There are three classes of aviation medical certificates: Class 1, Class 2, and Class 3. Class 1 is the most restrictive; Class 3 is the least restrictive. Aviation medical examinations are conducted by FAA-approved physicians. Parkland College requires that prospective students, at minimum, pass a Class 3 physical examination prior to enrolling for their first course. Any class of medical certificate with a student pilot certificate is acceptable. Academic Assessment To take courses at Parkland College, you will need to place into college level reading, writing, and math.
Students will need to demonstrate their college-level reading, writing, and mathematics skills. [-]

Instrument Rating Aircraft

Avel Flight School
Campus Full time 4 - 6 weeks September 2017 USA West Chicago

An Instrument Rating is required for a pilot to fly under Instrument flight rules (IFR). Under these conditions the pilot is unable to use external visual references for navigation and flies the aircraft solely based on the instruments in the cockpit. This rating is also a requirement for employment as a professional pilot and is a prerequisite for the Airline Transport Pilot License (ATPL). [+]

An Instrument Rating is required for a pilot to fly under Instrument flight rules (IFR). Under these conditions the pilot is unable to use external visual references for navigation and flies the aircraft solely based on the instruments in the cockpit. This rating is also a requirement for employment as a professional pilot and is a prerequisite for the Airline Transport Pilot License (ATPL). Minimum requirements to obtain an Instrument Rating Be at least 17 years of age Be able to read, speak, write and understand the English language fluently. Hold a Private Pilot License. Obtain at least a third class medical certificate from an Aviation Medical Examiner Pass a computerized aeronautical knowledge test Accumulate and log a specified amount of training and experience under Part 61, Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) section 61.65. Pass an oral test and flight test administered by an FAA inspector or designated examiner The minimum required time for the Instrument Rating is 40 Hours of actual or simulated instrument time under CFR 14 Part 61. Course Duration 4 – 6 Weeks* *Subject to flying weather availability and student aptitude Theory PART I - DISCOVERING NEW HORIZONS BUILDING PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE INSTRUMENT / COMMERCIAL TRAINING AND OPPORTUNITIES ADVANCED HUMAN FACTOR CONCEPTS PRINCIPLES OF INSTRUMENT FLIGHT FLIGHT INSTRUMENT SYSTEMS ATTITUDE INSTRUMENT FLYING INSTRUMENT NAVIGATION THE FLIGHT ENVIRONMENT AIRPORTS, AIRSPACE AND FLIGHT INFORMATION AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL INFORMATION ATC CLEARANCES PART II - INSTRUMENT CHARTS AND PROCEDURES DEPARTURE DEPARTURE CHARTS DEPARTURE PROCEDURES ENROUTE ENROUTE AND AREA CHARTS ENROUTE PROCEDURES HOLDING PROCEDURES ARRIVAL ARRIVAL CHARTS ARRIVAL PROCEDURES APPROACH APPROACH CHARTS APPROACH PROCEDURES INSTRUMENT APPROACHES VOR AND NDB APPROACHES ILS APPROACHES GPS AND RNAV APPROACHES PART III - AVIATION WEATHER AND IFR FLIGHT OPERATIONS METEOROLOGY WEATHER FACTORS WEATHER HAZARDS PRINTED REPORTS AND FORECASTS GRAPHIC WEATHER PRODUCTS SOURCE OF WEATHER INFORMATION IFR FLIGHT CONSIDERATIONS IFR EMERGENCIES IFR DECISION MAKING IFR FLIGHT PLANNING Practical STAGE I - BASIC ATTITUDE INSTRUMENT FLYING STRAIGHT & LEVEL STANDARD RATE TURNS CONSTANT AIR SPEED /RATE WITH CLIMBSIDESCENTS CLIMBING & DESCENDING TURNS STALLS & RECOVERIES SLOW FLIGHT UNUSUAL ATTITUDES STEEP TURNS TIMED TURNS COMPASS TURNS STAGE II - NAVIGATION & APPROACH PROCEEDURES VOR TRACKING, KEY HEADING, INTERCEPTION NAVCOURSE NDB HOMING, TRACKING & INTERCEPTION HOLDINGS PRECISION & NON-PRECISION APPROACHES MISSED APPROACH CIRCLING APPROACH LANDING FROM A STRAIGHT IN OR CIRCLING APPROACH STAGE III - CROSS COUNTRY STABE IV - CHECKRIDE PREPERATION [-]

Commercial Pilot License

Avel Flight School
Campus Full time 6 - 8 months September 2017 USA West Chicago

The Commercial Pilot License allows you to fly an aircraft for compensation or hire. This is also the minimum license requirement for employment as a pilot or become a flight instructor. Commercial pilots can also be paid for certain types of operations, such as banner towing, agricultural applications, and photography. [+]

Course Studies in Pilot Training in Illinois in USA. The Commercial Pilot License allows you to fly an aircraft for compensation or hire. This is also the minimum license requirement for employment as a pilot or become a flight instructor. Commercial pilots can also be paid for certain types of operations, such as banner towing, agricultural applications, and photography. Minimum requirements to obtain a Commercial Pilot License Be at least 18 years of age Be able to read, speak, write and understand the English language fluently. Hold a Private Pilot License. Obtain at least a second class medical certificate from an Aviation Medical Examiner Pass a computerized aeronautical knowledge test Accumulate and log a specified amount of training and experience under Part 61, Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) section 61.129. Pass an oral test and flight test administered by an FAA inspector or designated examiner The minimum required time for the Commercial Pilot License is 250 Hours under CFR 14 Part 61. Course Duration 6 – 8 months* *Subject to flying weather availability and student aptitude Theory PART I COMMERCIAL PILOT OPERATIONS ADVANCED SYSTEMS HIGH – PERFORMANCE POWERPLANTS ENVIRONMENTAL AND ICE CONTROL SYSTEMS RETRACTABLE LANDING GEAR AERODYNAMICS AND PERFORMANCE LIMITATIONS ADVANCED AERODYNAMICS PREDICTING PERFORMANCES CONTROLLING WEIGHT AND BALANCE COMMERCIAL FLIGHT CONSIDERATIONS EMERGENCY PROCEDURES COMMERCIAL DECISION MAKING Practical STAGE I TAKE OFFS, LANDINGS, & GO-AROUNDS NORMAL & X-WIND TAKE OFF & CLIMB NORMAL & X-WIND APPROACH & LANDING SOFT/SHORT-FIELD TAKE OFF & CLIMB SOFT/SHORT-FIELD APPROACH & LANDING GO-AROUND STAGE II PERFORMANCE MANEUVERS STEEP TURNS CHANDELLES LAZY EIGHTS STAGE III GROUND REFERENCE MANEUVER EIGHT ON PYLON STAGE IV NAVIGATION PILOTAGE & DEAD RECKONING NAVIGATION SYSTEM & ATC RADAR SERVICES DIVERSION LOST PROCEDURE STAGE V SLOW FLIGHT & STALLS MANEUVERING DURING SLOW FLIGHT POWER-OFF STALLS POWER-ON STALLS SPIN AWARENESS STAGE VI EMERGENCY OPERATIONS EMERGENCY DESCENT EMERGENCY APPROACH & LANDING SYSTEM & EQUIPMENT MALFUNCTIONS EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT & SURVIVAL GEAR STAGE VII HIGH ALTITUDE OPERATIONS SUPPLEMENTAL OXYGEN PRESSURIZATION STAGE VIII CHECK RIDE PREPARATION [-]

Private Pilot License

Avel Flight School
Campus Full time 6 - 8 weeks September 2017 USA West Chicago

The Private Pilot License allows you to be Pilot In Command of an aircraft for any non commercial purpose. This is also the first step towards getting your Commercial Pilot License and later an airline job. Among the many privilages of the Private Pilot License, you are also allowed to operate charity flights subject to certain restrictions, and may participate in similar activities, such as Angel Flight, Civil Air Patrol and many others. [+]

The Private Pilot License allows you to be Pilot In Command of an aircraft for any non commercial purpose. This is also the first step towards getting your Commercial Pilot License and later an airline job. Among the many privilages of the Private Pilot License, you are also allowed to operate charity flights subject to certain restrictions, and may participate in similar activities, such as Angel Flight, Civil Air Patrol and many others. Minimum requirements to obtain a Private Pilot License Be at least 17 years of age Be able to read, speak, write and understand the English language fluently. Obtain at least a third class medical certificate from an Aviation Medical Examiner Pass a computerized aeronautical knowledge test Accumulate and log a specified amount of training and experience under Part 61, Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) section 61.109. Pass an oral test and flight test administered by an FAA inspector or designated examiner While the minimum required time for Private Pilot License is 40 Hours. The national average for completing Private Pilot License is approximately 65 Hours of flight time. Course Duration 6 – 8 Weeks* *Subject to flying weather availability and student aptitude Theory PART I FUNDAMENTALS OF FLIGHT DISCOVERING AVIATION PILOT TRAINING AVIATION OPPORTUNITIES INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN FACTORS AIRPLANE SYSTEMS AIRPLANES THE POWERPLANT AND RELATED SYSTEMS FLIGHT INSTRUMENTS AERODYNAMIC PRINCIPLES FOUR FORCES OF FLIGHT STABILITY AERODYNAMICS OF MANEUVERING FLIGHT PART II FLIGHT OPERATIONS THE FLIGHT ENVIRONMENT SAFETY OF FLIGHT AIRPORTS AERONAUTICAL CHARTS AIRSPACE COMMUNICATION AND FLIGHT INFORMATION RADAR AND ATC SERVICES RADIO PROCEDURES SOURCES OF FLIGHT INFORMATION PART III AVIATION WEATHER METEOROLOTY FOR PILOTS BASIC WEATHER THEORY WEATHER PATTERNS WEATHER HAZARDS INTERPRETING WEATHER DATA THE FORECASTING PROCESS PRINTED REPORTS AND FORECASTS GRAPHIC WEATHER PRODUCTS SOURCES OF WEATHER INFORMATION PART IV PERFORMANCE AND NAVIGATION AIRPLANE PERFORMANCE PREDICTING PERFORMANCE WEIGHT AND BALANCE FLIGHT COMPUTERS NAVIGATION PILOTAGE AND DEAD RECKONING VOR NAVIGATION ADF NAVIGATION ADVANCED NAVIGATION PART V INTEGRATING PILOT KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS APPLYING HUMAN FACTOR PRINCIPLES AVIATION PHYSIOLOGY AERONAUTICAL DECISION MAKING FLYING CROSS-COUNTRY THE FLIGHT PLANNING PROCESS THE FLIGHT Practical STAGE I PRE-SOLO STRAIGHT & LEVEL TAKE OFF & LANDINGS/ X-WINDS CLIMBS & DESCENTS WITH TURNS SLOW FLIGHT STALLS & RECOVERIES SPIN AWARENESS STEEP TURNS RECTANGULAR COURSE S-TURNS TURNS AROUND A POINT EMERGENCY DESCENT FORWARD SLIP EMERGENCY PROCEEDURES / GO AROUND TRAFFIC PATTERN /TOUCH & GO’S FIRST, SECOND, AND THIRD SOLOS STAGE II POST-SOLO SOFT/SHORT FIELD TAKE OFF & LANDINGS VOR NAVIGATION -TRACKING, INTERCEPTION, KEY HEADING NIGHT FLIGHT STAGE III BASIC ATTITUDE INSTRUMENT STRAIGHT & LEVEL FLIGHT CONSTANT AIRSPEED CLIMBS / DESCENTS TURNS TO HEADINGS RECOVERY FROM UNUSUAL FLIGHT ATTITUDES RADIO COMMUNICATIONS, NAVIGATION, SYSTEMS / FACILITIES, & RADAR SERVICES STAGE IV CROSS COUNTRIES PILOTAGE AND DEAD RECONING LOST PROCEEDURES DIVERSIONS FLIGHT FOLLOWING STAGE V CHECKRIDE PREPERATION [-]