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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[db_lead] =>

Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[db_lead] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[text] =>

Probably not.  But it certainly can buy some peace of mind—especially when we’re talking about student debt.  A recent study from Purdue University suggests that while a certain income level may make you happy, you need to factor in debt to understand your overall happiness. 

Louis Tay, assistant professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University determined that “carrying student loan debt is almost as important as income in predicting financial worry and life satisfaction.”  Tay and his researchers, Cassondra Batz, Scott Parrigon, and Lauren Kuykendall, published the study in the Journal of Happiness Studies; they used an online college alumni sample of 2,781 people from the US.   Most students graduated in 2008, and have been carrying student debt for the past seven years.  Tay looked at relationships among average household income, student loan amount, life satisfaction, and sense of financial stress.  “We always think about how much income you can earn, but the reality is you can’t guarantee what you will earn post-college,” he said.  “There is a lot in the news about reducing, balancing, or managing college student debt, and this study shows the burden it can take on one’s life for the long term.”

Their findings?  The financial strain caused by student debt lowers your sense of well-being.  “A lot of people are pursuing a college education, which is a good thing,” said Tay.  “However, the financial cost of doing so also needs to be considered… There large loan numbers can sometimes be thrown around without us actually realizing [the] day-to-day impact on our lives.  We are now translating student loan debt to actual psychological and emotional burden.”

Your takeaway?  The key to your future happiness may lie in the amount of debt you already have—and are willing to take on.  Think carefully about your options and how you want your debt to influence your well-being.

Learn more about studying in the US

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Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[db_lead] =>

Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[text] =>

Probably not.  But it certainly can buy some peace of mind—especially when we’re talking about student debt.  A recent study from Purdue University suggests that while a certain income level may make you happy, you need to factor in debt to understand your overall happiness. 

Louis Tay, assistant professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University determined that “carrying student loan debt is almost as important as income in predicting financial worry and life satisfaction.”  Tay and his researchers, Cassondra Batz, Scott Parrigon, and Lauren Kuykendall, published the study in the Journal of Happiness Studies; they used an online college alumni sample of 2,781 people from the US.   Most students graduated in 2008, and have been carrying student debt for the past seven years.  Tay looked at relationships among average household income, student loan amount, life satisfaction, and sense of financial stress.  “We always think about how much income you can earn, but the reality is you can’t guarantee what you will earn post-college,” he said.  “There is a lot in the news about reducing, balancing, or managing college student debt, and this study shows the burden it can take on one’s life for the long term.”

Their findings?  The financial strain caused by student debt lowers your sense of well-being.  “A lot of people are pursuing a college education, which is a good thing,” said Tay.  “However, the financial cost of doing so also needs to be considered… There large loan numbers can sometimes be thrown around without us actually realizing [the] day-to-day impact on our lives.  We are now translating student loan debt to actual psychological and emotional burden.”

Your takeaway?  The key to your future happiness may lie in the amount of debt you already have—and are willing to take on.  Think carefully about your options and how you want your debt to influence your well-being.

Learn more about studying in the US

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Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[text] =>

From academic help to student life, and visas requirements to housing options, International Student Services offices around the world work hard to welcome and support international students from all walks of life.  Finding a university that matches your interests—and your needs—as an international student takes a bit of work.  We’ve put together a list of several factors for international students to consider when evaluating a prospective university.  Take a closer look. 

 

1. Numbers of Students

Generally speaking, if there are more international students on a campus, there are probably more resources.  At schools with big international populations, like Polk State College, or Centennial College, you can expect to find services for admissions counseling, social services, financial aid help, and mentoring programs.  One downside?  Make sure schools with larger international student populations have the services that match the numbers, otherwise you may experience a backlog and not get the help when you need it. 

Consider the benefits of schools with a small international student population, like Vilnius Business College in Lithuania or West Hills College in the US.  Just because a university, like the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, has a small international population doesn’t mean that there are no services.  It might just mean that the university has a smaller International Student Services office. Even small schools—some with as little as .5 percent of its population made up of international students—have services to help students with visas, travel, accommodations, the academic calendar, and familiarizing themselves with the community.  You might also get more personalized attention than you would at a larger school.

 

2. Mentoring Systems

Think about how a university welcomes its international students from the get-go. International students at top-rated Lund University in Sweden are greeted by student mentors and staff when they arrive at the airport.  Then they attend a fun social event where they meet other international students, and some of the faculty and staff in their programs.  Lund’s two-week orientation for all students combines special topics for international students on Swedish culture and food. Scotland’s University of Glasgow offers international students a similar welcome—and continued support with programs on Scotland’s history, and even workshops on budgeting and saving.

Why is this important?  You won’t succeed if you don’t feel welcomed by your new community.  Look for a school that works to welcome you and to continue to help you acclimate to your new school.

 

3. International Students Associations

Are there any on campus?  You’ll need more than just an International Student Services office—you’ll need the support of other international students. North Iowa Area Community College features an International Students and Friends Club for international and migrant students, as well as domestic students who want to get involved with the college’s international community. MIT is another example of a campus with a vibrant International Student Association.  In an effort to provide learning opportunities for all of its students, MIT allows domestic students to join the association also.  Their goal?  To promote cultural diversity on campus.  Not only to they offer delicious study breaks and fun trips, they also encourage students to get involved on their campus and the local community. 

 

4. Housing Help

You make “home” wherever you go in this world.  It’s nice to have help, especially when you’re not just new to the school, but new to the country, too.  Your International Student Office, like the ones at Western Iowa Tech Community College, College of Southern Idaho or Bifröst University in Iceland, should be able to direct you to on-campus options—and should also put you in touch with other students, faculty, and even local families who may have rooms or apartments for rent.  Think about what you want and how much money you want to spend.  If you want to save money, consider renting a room from a local family or a faculty member.  You can also contact your International Student Services office for help in finding a roommate. 

Studying abroad is one of the most exciting options you can consider as a student.   Bottom line?  Do your homework.  Research the schools where you might want to study.  Visit, if you can.  Talk to the staff at the International Student Services offices.  Get a feel for what you want—and focus on what you need. 

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Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[db_lead] =>

Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[text] =>

From academic help to student life, and visas requirements to housing options, International Student Services offices around the world work hard to welcome and support international students from all walks of life.  Finding a university that matches your interests—and your needs—as an international student takes a bit of work.  We’ve put together a list of several factors for international students to consider when evaluating a prospective university.  Take a closer look. 

 

1. Numbers of Students

Generally speaking, if there are more international students on a campus, there are probably more resources.  At schools with big international populations, like Polk State College, or Centennial College, you can expect to find services for admissions counseling, social services, financial aid help, and mentoring programs.  One downside?  Make sure schools with larger international student populations have the services that match the numbers, otherwise you may experience a backlog and not get the help when you need it. 

Consider the benefits of schools with a small international student population, like Vilnius Business College in Lithuania or West Hills College in the US.  Just because a university, like the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, has a small international population doesn’t mean that there are no services.  It might just mean that the university has a smaller International Student Services office. Even small schools—some with as little as .5 percent of its population made up of international students—have services to help students with visas, travel, accommodations, the academic calendar, and familiarizing themselves with the community.  You might also get more personalized attention than you would at a larger school.

 

2. Mentoring Systems

Think about how a university welcomes its international students from the get-go. International students at top-rated Lund University in Sweden are greeted by student mentors and staff when they arrive at the airport.  Then they attend a fun social event where they meet other international students, and some of the faculty and staff in their programs.  Lund’s two-week orientation for all students combines special topics for international students on Swedish culture and food. Scotland’s University of Glasgow offers international students a similar welcome—and continued support with programs on Scotland’s history, and even workshops on budgeting and saving.

Why is this important?  You won’t succeed if you don’t feel welcomed by your new community.  Look for a school that works to welcome you and to continue to help you acclimate to your new school.

 

3. International Students Associations

Are there any on campus?  You’ll need more than just an International Student Services office—you’ll need the support of other international students. North Iowa Area Community College features an International Students and Friends Club for international and migrant students, as well as domestic students who want to get involved with the college’s international community. MIT is another example of a campus with a vibrant International Student Association.  In an effort to provide learning opportunities for all of its students, MIT allows domestic students to join the association also.  Their goal?  To promote cultural diversity on campus.  Not only to they offer delicious study breaks and fun trips, they also encourage students to get involved on their campus and the local community. 

 

4. Housing Help

You make “home” wherever you go in this world.  It’s nice to have help, especially when you’re not just new to the school, but new to the country, too.  Your International Student Office, like the ones at Western Iowa Tech Community College, College of Southern Idaho or Bifröst University in Iceland, should be able to direct you to on-campus options—and should also put you in touch with other students, faculty, and even local families who may have rooms or apartments for rent.  Think about what you want and how much money you want to spend.  If you want to save money, consider renting a room from a local family or a faculty member.  You can also contact your International Student Services office for help in finding a roommate. 

Studying abroad is one of the most exciting options you can consider as a student.   Bottom line?  Do your homework.  Research the schools where you might want to study.  Visit, if you can.  Talk to the staff at the International Student Services offices.  Get a feel for what you want—and focus on what you need. 

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Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[text] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

About Learning Styles

According to an article published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the term learning style “refers to the fact that each person has a different way of accumulating knowledge.” This concept was first proposed in the 1970s, with a number of different models emerging to represent the way researchers believe human beings learn.

It’s important to note that while learning styles may indeed reflect individual preferences for how information is received, there’s no conclusive evidence indicating that identifying a person’s preferred learning style impacts outcomes. Still, many schools assess learning styles to help teachers and students alike better understand the process.

Understanding Learning Styles

Proposed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, the VARK model is one of the most commonly accepted classifications of learning styles. It comprises four modalities, including the following:

 

1. Visual (V)

Do you feel like you learn better through graphics? If so, you may be a visual learner. This mode includes the depiction of information via “maps, spider diagrams, charts, graphs, flow charts, labeled diagrams, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices, that people use to represent what could have been presented in words.”

Visual learning methods typically include patterns, shapes, designs and whitespace, but do not include pictures, photographs, videos, movies or even PowerPoint presentations. While words in boxes may be preferable for different types of learners, visual learners prefer that information be conveyed via diagrams, meaningful symbols, and other graphic formats.

For visual learners, seeking out courses which incorporate lots of visuals is a great start. Drawing visuals of problems; using graphing calculators; and developing your own visual aids, such as cognitive maps and charts, can further enrich your learning experience.

 

2. Aural/Auditory (A)

Do you feel like you take in information better when you hear it spoken aloud or say it out loud to yourself? If so, you may be an aural/auditory learner. According to VARK-Learn’s definition, individuals in this category learn best from “lectures, group discussion, radio, email, using mobile phones, speaking, web-chat and talking things through.”

Also included in this learning mode? Email -- because it is often conveyed and received “chat-style.” Aural/auditory learners also prefer sorting out their thoughts and questions aloud -- often repeating what they’ve heard aloud in their own words.

If you fall into the aural/auditory learning mode category, recommended study strategies include attending lectures; reading textbook information aloud; recording text materials as well as lectures; and choosing classes with opportunities for oral discussion.

 

3. Read/Write (R)

Are you all about words? Do you remember what you read better than what you hear? If so, you likely have a preference for the read/write learning modality. One of the most popular modes of learning for teachers and students, this category comprises “text-based input and output,” such as reading and writing assignments, essays, reports and manuals. Commonly relied on resources for read/write learners include dictionaries, quotations, the internet, PowerPoint, and lists.

Study strategies for students who prefer this learning style include reading textbooks; taking good notes; and choosing courses which focus on writing assignments.

 

4. Kinesthetic (K)

Do you learn best by doing? If so, your preference may be the increasingly prevalent kinesthetic model, which prioritizes the use of experience and practice over concepts and theory. According to VARK-Learn, “people who prefer this mode are connected to reality, either through concrete personal experiences, examples, practice or simulation.”  This active, tactile approach includes everything from demonstrations and simulations to videos and movies. Case studies, applications and practice (either real or simulated) are also preferred kinesthetic learning methods.

Kinesthetic learning can be particularly valuable to STEM students, according to edutopia, because it helps them breach mental barriers, accept different approaches to information, and ultimately assume a more “receptive state required for learning.”

Manipulative study strategies work well for kinesthetic learners, including writing, making visuals and models, using your fingers, and preparing index cards. Furthermore, incorporating movement while studying -- from chewing gum to tapping your pencil -- can help support focus and attention.

One last thing to keep in mind? Learning styles aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, research indicates that many students amalgamate a mix of learning styles. Even better? There’s no proof that a single learning style or combination of learning styles is more effective or less effective than another. Rather, it’s all about what works best for you.

 

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Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[db_lead] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[text] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

About Learning Styles

According to an article published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the term learning style “refers to the fact that each person has a different way of accumulating knowledge.” This concept was first proposed in the 1970s, with a number of different models emerging to represent the way researchers believe human beings learn.

It’s important to note that while learning styles may indeed reflect individual preferences for how information is received, there’s no conclusive evidence indicating that identifying a person’s preferred learning style impacts outcomes. Still, many schools assess learning styles to help teachers and students alike better understand the process.

Understanding Learning Styles

Proposed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, the VARK model is one of the most commonly accepted classifications of learning styles. It comprises four modalities, including the following:

 

1. Visual (V)

Do you feel like you learn better through graphics? If so, you may be a visual learner. This mode includes the depiction of information via “maps, spider diagrams, charts, graphs, flow charts, labeled diagrams, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices, that people use to represent what could have been presented in words.”

Visual learning methods typically include patterns, shapes, designs and whitespace, but do not include pictures, photographs, videos, movies or even PowerPoint presentations. While words in boxes may be preferable for different types of learners, visual learners prefer that information be conveyed via diagrams, meaningful symbols, and other graphic formats.

For visual learners, seeking out courses which incorporate lots of visuals is a great start. Drawing visuals of problems; using graphing calculators; and developing your own visual aids, such as cognitive maps and charts, can further enrich your learning experience.

 

2. Aural/Auditory (A)

Do you feel like you take in information better when you hear it spoken aloud or say it out loud to yourself? If so, you may be an aural/auditory learner. According to VARK-Learn’s definition, individuals in this category learn best from “lectures, group discussion, radio, email, using mobile phones, speaking, web-chat and talking things through.”

Also included in this learning mode? Email -- because it is often conveyed and received “chat-style.” Aural/auditory learners also prefer sorting out their thoughts and questions aloud -- often repeating what they’ve heard aloud in their own words.

If you fall into the aural/auditory learning mode category, recommended study strategies include attending lectures; reading textbook information aloud; recording text materials as well as lectures; and choosing classes with opportunities for oral discussion.

 

3. Read/Write (R)

Are you all about words? Do you remember what you read better than what you hear? If so, you likely have a preference for the read/write learning modality. One of the most popular modes of learning for teachers and students, this category comprises “text-based input and output,” such as reading and writing assignments, essays, reports and manuals. Commonly relied on resources for read/write learners include dictionaries, quotations, the internet, PowerPoint, and lists.

Study strategies for students who prefer this learning style include reading textbooks; taking good notes; and choosing courses which focus on writing assignments.

 

4. Kinesthetic (K)

Do you learn best by doing? If so, your preference may be the increasingly prevalent kinesthetic model, which prioritizes the use of experience and practice over concepts and theory. According to VARK-Learn, “people who prefer this mode are connected to reality, either through concrete personal experiences, examples, practice or simulation.”  This active, tactile approach includes everything from demonstrations and simulations to videos and movies. Case studies, applications and practice (either real or simulated) are also preferred kinesthetic learning methods.

Kinesthetic learning can be particularly valuable to STEM students, according to edutopia, because it helps them breach mental barriers, accept different approaches to information, and ultimately assume a more “receptive state required for learning.”

Manipulative study strategies work well for kinesthetic learners, including writing, making visuals and models, using your fingers, and preparing index cards. Furthermore, incorporating movement while studying -- from chewing gum to tapping your pencil -- can help support focus and attention.

One last thing to keep in mind? Learning styles aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, research indicates that many students amalgamate a mix of learning styles. Even better? There’s no proof that a single learning style or combination of learning styles is more effective or less effective than another. Rather, it’s all about what works best for you.

 

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Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[text] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and business person may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

 

1. Perfusionist

Never heard of this job before? Neither had we until we stumbled upon someone enthusing over it on Reddit. So what is a perfusionist? Also known as a cardiovascular perfusionist or clinical perfusionist, these specialized healthcare professionals are a critical part of any cardiothoracic team. Perfusionists are trained in operating heart-lung machines, which are used to temporarily replace both circulatory and respiratory function during cardiac surgery.

While this job can be stressful, it’s also incredibly fulfilling as perfusionists are directly involved in life-saving procedures. You can expect to be well-rewarded financially, as well: Experienced perfusionists can earn upwards of $100,000 a year.

You also can’t go wrong with this job in terms of security. As the population ages, the American Society for Extracorporeal Technology anticipates that demand will continue to rise for certified perfusionists.

 

2. Technical Writer

Technical companies may have amazing products and services, but if they can’t communicate their use to the public in an understandable way, they are unlikely to succeed. Enter technical writers.

These detail-oriented professionals typically have a combination of strong writing and critical thinking skills, along with a technical background which qualifies them to translate complex scientific or technical information in a coherent way. Technical writers work in a variety of industries with engineering and computer companies particularly in need of their services.

 

3. Accent Reduction Specialist

You may have never heard of accent reduction specialists before, but these professionals scored the top spot on a CNN roundup of “10 little-known fields with great job opportunities.”

So what do accent reduction specialists do? Simply put, they help people with strong accents and/or poor language skills learn to communicate better in order to break down barriers, change perception, and promote understanding. And while accent reduction specialists work with people with regional accents, their services are expected to be increasingly in demand with the globalization of the economy.

No formal certification is necessary to work in this field, but many accent reduction specialists begin their careers with an associate or bachelor’s degree in speech. Advanced studies in speech-language pathology, meanwhile, further qualify you to succeed as an accent reduction specialist.

 

4. Court Stenographer

Most people only think of lawyers and judges when they ponder legal careers, but the reality there are many different kinds of professionals working behind the scenes, including court stenographers. The most widely used form of recording court proceedings, stenography is the act of recording spoken words -- either through the use of a stenotype machine or shorthand.

In addition to working inside courtrooms, stenographers can also be found everywhere from corporate work to providing closed captioning services for the hard-of-hearing. Regardless of the setting, speed and accuracy are hallmarks of the best stenographers.

While many court stenographers are employed by legal entities, others work on a freelance basis. Your takeaway? If the thought of making your own schedule and working independently appeals to you, then you may have a bright future in this field -- which was listed by Business Insider as one of “16 Awesome Career Choices That Most College Kids Have Never Heard Of.”

 

5. Blacksmith

Also earning a spot on Business Insider’s list? Blacksmiths. Many people mistakenly assume that this craft -- which involves shaping iron and steel by forging them in fire --  is no longer practiced, but metalsmithing is very much alive and well today.

Blacksmithing involves far more than making horseshoes. It’s also a wonderful way to express your creativity. In fact, for people who enjoy design, working with their hands, and interacting with others, blacksmithing offers up a compelling counterpoint to an office job.

Wondering how to get started in blacksmithing? Programs like Fleming College’s Visual and Creative Arts Diploma (VCAD) offer exposure to foundational courses as well as studio-based learning and techniques in blacksmithing and other electives.

While conventional careers have plenty to offer, they can also be less-than-exciting, especially if you land on them by default. By researching as many potential career pathways as possible, you can ensure that you choose the one most likely to help you find fulfillment -- even if it comes from an unlikely or unexpected source.

,[link_description] => ,[meta_description] => ,[meta_keywords] => Careers,[aproved_enum] => NO,[published_at] => 2016-11-02 17:22:26,[editingSource_enum] => MasterStudies),[] => ,[cover_photo] => ,[idType] => 75,[idProvider] => 0,[ntype] => ,[news_type] => article,[head_title] => ,[lead] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[db_lead] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[text] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and business person may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

 

1. Perfusionist

Never heard of this job before? Neither had we until we stumbled upon someone enthusing over it on Reddit. So what is a perfusionist? Also known as a cardiovascular perfusionist or clinical perfusionist, these specialized healthcare professionals are a critical part of any cardiothoracic team. Perfusionists are trained in operating heart-lung machines, which are used to temporarily replace both circulatory and respiratory function during cardiac surgery.

While this job can be stressful, it’s also incredibly fulfilling as perfusionists are directly involved in life-saving procedures. You can expect to be well-rewarded financially, as well: Experienced perfusionists can earn upwards of $100,000 a year.

You also can’t go wrong with this job in terms of security. As the population ages, the American Society for Extracorporeal Technology anticipates that demand will continue to rise for certified perfusionists.

 

2. Technical Writer

Technical companies may have amazing products and services, but if they can’t communicate their use to the public in an understandable way, they are unlikely to succeed. Enter technical writers.

These detail-oriented professionals typically have a combination of strong writing and critical thinking skills, along with a technical background which qualifies them to translate complex scientific or technical information in a coherent way. Technical writers work in a variety of industries with engineering and computer companies particularly in need of their services.

 

3. Accent Reduction Specialist

You may have never heard of accent reduction specialists before, but these professionals scored the top spot on a CNN roundup of “10 little-known fields with great job opportunities.”

So what do accent reduction specialists do? Simply put, they help people with strong accents and/or poor language skills learn to communicate better in order to break down barriers, change perception, and promote understanding. And while accent reduction specialists work with people with regional accents, their services are expected to be increasingly in demand with the globalization of the economy.

No formal certification is necessary to work in this field, but many accent reduction specialists begin their careers with an associate or bachelor’s degree in speech. Advanced studies in speech-language pathology, meanwhile, further qualify you to succeed as an accent reduction specialist.

 

4. Court Stenographer

Most people only think of lawyers and judges when they ponder legal careers, but the reality there are many different kinds of professionals working behind the scenes, including court stenographers. The most widely used form of recording court proceedings, stenography is the act of recording spoken words -- either through the use of a stenotype machine or shorthand.

In addition to working inside courtrooms, stenographers can also be found everywhere from corporate work to providing closed captioning services for the hard-of-hearing. Regardless of the setting, speed and accuracy are hallmarks of the best stenographers.

While many court stenographers are employed by legal entities, others work on a freelance basis. Your takeaway? If the thought of making your own schedule and working independently appeals to you, then you may have a bright future in this field -- which was listed by Business Insider as one of “16 Awesome Career Choices That Most College Kids Have Never Heard Of.”

 

5. Blacksmith

Also earning a spot on Business Insider’s list? Blacksmiths. Many people mistakenly assume that this craft -- which involves shaping iron and steel by forging them in fire --  is no longer practiced, but metalsmithing is very much alive and well today.

Blacksmithing involves far more than making horseshoes. It’s also a wonderful way to express your creativity. In fact, for people who enjoy design, working with their hands, and interacting with others, blacksmithing offers up a compelling counterpoint to an office job.

Wondering how to get started in blacksmithing? Programs like Fleming College’s Visual and Creative Arts Diploma (VCAD) offer exposure to foundational courses as well as studio-based learning and techniques in blacksmithing and other electives.

While conventional careers have plenty to offer, they can also be less-than-exciting, especially if you land on them by default. By researching as many potential career pathways as possible, you can ensure that you choose the one most likely to help you find fulfillment -- even if it comes from an unlikely or unexpected source.

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[db_lead] =>

Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[db_lead] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[text] =>

Probably not.  But it certainly can buy some peace of mind—especially when we’re talking about student debt.  A recent study from Purdue University suggests that while a certain income level may make you happy, you need to factor in debt to understand your overall happiness. 

Louis Tay, assistant professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University determined that “carrying student loan debt is almost as important as income in predicting financial worry and life satisfaction.”  Tay and his researchers, Cassondra Batz, Scott Parrigon, and Lauren Kuykendall, published the study in the Journal of Happiness Studies; they used an online college alumni sample of 2,781 people from the US.   Most students graduated in 2008, and have been carrying student debt for the past seven years.  Tay looked at relationships among average household income, student loan amount, life satisfaction, and sense of financial stress.  “We always think about how much income you can earn, but the reality is you can’t guarantee what you will earn post-college,” he said.  “There is a lot in the news about reducing, balancing, or managing college student debt, and this study shows the burden it can take on one’s life for the long term.”

Their findings?  The financial strain caused by student debt lowers your sense of well-being.  “A lot of people are pursuing a college education, which is a good thing,” said Tay.  “However, the financial cost of doing so also needs to be considered… There large loan numbers can sometimes be thrown around without us actually realizing [the] day-to-day impact on our lives.  We are now translating student loan debt to actual psychological and emotional burden.”

Your takeaway?  The key to your future happiness may lie in the amount of debt you already have—and are willing to take on.  Think carefully about your options and how you want your debt to influence your well-being.

Learn more about studying in the US

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Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[db_lead] =>

Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[text] =>

Probably not.  But it certainly can buy some peace of mind—especially when we’re talking about student debt.  A recent study from Purdue University suggests that while a certain income level may make you happy, you need to factor in debt to understand your overall happiness. 

Louis Tay, assistant professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University determined that “carrying student loan debt is almost as important as income in predicting financial worry and life satisfaction.”  Tay and his researchers, Cassondra Batz, Scott Parrigon, and Lauren Kuykendall, published the study in the Journal of Happiness Studies; they used an online college alumni sample of 2,781 people from the US.   Most students graduated in 2008, and have been carrying student debt for the past seven years.  Tay looked at relationships among average household income, student loan amount, life satisfaction, and sense of financial stress.  “We always think about how much income you can earn, but the reality is you can’t guarantee what you will earn post-college,” he said.  “There is a lot in the news about reducing, balancing, or managing college student debt, and this study shows the burden it can take on one’s life for the long term.”

Their findings?  The financial strain caused by student debt lowers your sense of well-being.  “A lot of people are pursuing a college education, which is a good thing,” said Tay.  “However, the financial cost of doing so also needs to be considered… There large loan numbers can sometimes be thrown around without us actually realizing [the] day-to-day impact on our lives.  We are now translating student loan debt to actual psychological and emotional burden.”

Your takeaway?  The key to your future happiness may lie in the amount of debt you already have—and are willing to take on.  Think carefully about your options and how you want your debt to influence your well-being.

Learn more about studying in the US

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Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[text] =>

From academic help to student life, and visas requirements to housing options, International Student Services offices around the world work hard to welcome and support international students from all walks of life.  Finding a university that matches your interests—and your needs—as an international student takes a bit of work.  We’ve put together a list of several factors for international students to consider when evaluating a prospective university.  Take a closer look. 

 

1. Numbers of Students

Generally speaking, if there are more international students on a campus, there are probably more resources.  At schools with big international populations, like Polk State College, or Centennial College, you can expect to find services for admissions counseling, social services, financial aid help, and mentoring programs.  One downside?  Make sure schools with larger international student populations have the services that match the numbers, otherwise you may experience a backlog and not get the help when you need it. 

Consider the benefits of schools with a small international student population, like Vilnius Business College in Lithuania or West Hills College in the US.  Just because a university, like the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, has a small international population doesn’t mean that there are no services.  It might just mean that the university has a smaller International Student Services office. Even small schools—some with as little as .5 percent of its population made up of international students—have services to help students with visas, travel, accommodations, the academic calendar, and familiarizing themselves with the community.  You might also get more personalized attention than you would at a larger school.

 

2. Mentoring Systems

Think about how a university welcomes its international students from the get-go. International students at top-rated Lund University in Sweden are greeted by student mentors and staff when they arrive at the airport.  Then they attend a fun social event where they meet other international students, and some of the faculty and staff in their programs.  Lund’s two-week orientation for all students combines special topics for international students on Swedish culture and food. Scotland’s University of Glasgow offers international students a similar welcome—and continued support with programs on Scotland’s history, and even workshops on budgeting and saving.

Why is this important?  You won’t succeed if you don’t feel welcomed by your new community.  Look for a school that works to welcome you and to continue to help you acclimate to your new school.

 

3. International Students Associations

Are there any on campus?  You’ll need more than just an International Student Services office—you’ll need the support of other international students. North Iowa Area Community College features an International Students and Friends Club for international and migrant students, as well as domestic students who want to get involved with the college’s international community. MIT is another example of a campus with a vibrant International Student Association.  In an effort to provide learning opportunities for all of its students, MIT allows domestic students to join the association also.  Their goal?  To promote cultural diversity on campus.  Not only to they offer delicious study breaks and fun trips, they also encourage students to get involved on their campus and the local community. 

 

4. Housing Help

You make “home” wherever you go in this world.  It’s nice to have help, especially when you’re not just new to the school, but new to the country, too.  Your International Student Office, like the ones at Western Iowa Tech Community College, College of Southern Idaho or Bifröst University in Iceland, should be able to direct you to on-campus options—and should also put you in touch with other students, faculty, and even local families who may have rooms or apartments for rent.  Think about what you want and how much money you want to spend.  If you want to save money, consider renting a room from a local family or a faculty member.  You can also contact your International Student Services office for help in finding a roommate. 

Studying abroad is one of the most exciting options you can consider as a student.   Bottom line?  Do your homework.  Research the schools where you might want to study.  Visit, if you can.  Talk to the staff at the International Student Services offices.  Get a feel for what you want—and focus on what you need. 

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Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[db_lead] =>

Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[text] =>

From academic help to student life, and visas requirements to housing options, International Student Services offices around the world work hard to welcome and support international students from all walks of life.  Finding a university that matches your interests—and your needs—as an international student takes a bit of work.  We’ve put together a list of several factors for international students to consider when evaluating a prospective university.  Take a closer look. 

 

1. Numbers of Students

Generally speaking, if there are more international students on a campus, there are probably more resources.  At schools with big international populations, like Polk State College, or Centennial College, you can expect to find services for admissions counseling, social services, financial aid help, and mentoring programs.  One downside?  Make sure schools with larger international student populations have the services that match the numbers, otherwise you may experience a backlog and not get the help when you need it. 

Consider the benefits of schools with a small international student population, like Vilnius Business College in Lithuania or West Hills College in the US.  Just because a university, like the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, has a small international population doesn’t mean that there are no services.  It might just mean that the university has a smaller International Student Services office. Even small schools—some with as little as .5 percent of its population made up of international students—have services to help students with visas, travel, accommodations, the academic calendar, and familiarizing themselves with the community.  You might also get more personalized attention than you would at a larger school.

 

2. Mentoring Systems

Think about how a university welcomes its international students from the get-go. International students at top-rated Lund University in Sweden are greeted by student mentors and staff when they arrive at the airport.  Then they attend a fun social event where they meet other international students, and some of the faculty and staff in their programs.  Lund’s two-week orientation for all students combines special topics for international students on Swedish culture and food. Scotland’s University of Glasgow offers international students a similar welcome—and continued support with programs on Scotland’s history, and even workshops on budgeting and saving.

Why is this important?  You won’t succeed if you don’t feel welcomed by your new community.  Look for a school that works to welcome you and to continue to help you acclimate to your new school.

 

3. International Students Associations

Are there any on campus?  You’ll need more than just an International Student Services office—you’ll need the support of other international students. North Iowa Area Community College features an International Students and Friends Club for international and migrant students, as well as domestic students who want to get involved with the college’s international community. MIT is another example of a campus with a vibrant International Student Association.  In an effort to provide learning opportunities for all of its students, MIT allows domestic students to join the association also.  Their goal?  To promote cultural diversity on campus.  Not only to they offer delicious study breaks and fun trips, they also encourage students to get involved on their campus and the local community. 

 

4. Housing Help

You make “home” wherever you go in this world.  It’s nice to have help, especially when you’re not just new to the school, but new to the country, too.  Your International Student Office, like the ones at Western Iowa Tech Community College, College of Southern Idaho or Bifröst University in Iceland, should be able to direct you to on-campus options—and should also put you in touch with other students, faculty, and even local families who may have rooms or apartments for rent.  Think about what you want and how much money you want to spend.  If you want to save money, consider renting a room from a local family or a faculty member.  You can also contact your International Student Services office for help in finding a roommate. 

Studying abroad is one of the most exciting options you can consider as a student.   Bottom line?  Do your homework.  Research the schools where you might want to study.  Visit, if you can.  Talk to the staff at the International Student Services offices.  Get a feel for what you want—and focus on what you need. 

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Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[text] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

About Learning Styles

According to an article published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the term learning style “refers to the fact that each person has a different way of accumulating knowledge.” This concept was first proposed in the 1970s, with a number of different models emerging to represent the way researchers believe human beings learn.

It’s important to note that while learning styles may indeed reflect individual preferences for how information is received, there’s no conclusive evidence indicating that identifying a person’s preferred learning style impacts outcomes. Still, many schools assess learning styles to help teachers and students alike better understand the process.

Understanding Learning Styles

Proposed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, the VARK model is one of the most commonly accepted classifications of learning styles. It comprises four modalities, including the following:

 

1. Visual (V)

Do you feel like you learn better through graphics? If so, you may be a visual learner. This mode includes the depiction of information via “maps, spider diagrams, charts, graphs, flow charts, labeled diagrams, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices, that people use to represent what could have been presented in words.”

Visual learning methods typically include patterns, shapes, designs and whitespace, but do not include pictures, photographs, videos, movies or even PowerPoint presentations. While words in boxes may be preferable for different types of learners, visual learners prefer that information be conveyed via diagrams, meaningful symbols, and other graphic formats.

For visual learners, seeking out courses which incorporate lots of visuals is a great start. Drawing visuals of problems; using graphing calculators; and developing your own visual aids, such as cognitive maps and charts, can further enrich your learning experience.

 

2. Aural/Auditory (A)

Do you feel like you take in information better when you hear it spoken aloud or say it out loud to yourself? If so, you may be an aural/auditory learner. According to VARK-Learn’s definition, individuals in this category learn best from “lectures, group discussion, radio, email, using mobile phones, speaking, web-chat and talking things through.”

Also included in this learning mode? Email -- because it is often conveyed and received “chat-style.” Aural/auditory learners also prefer sorting out their thoughts and questions aloud -- often repeating what they’ve heard aloud in their own words.

If you fall into the aural/auditory learning mode category, recommended study strategies include attending lectures; reading textbook information aloud; recording text materials as well as lectures; and choosing classes with opportunities for oral discussion.

 

3. Read/Write (R)

Are you all about words? Do you remember what you read better than what you hear? If so, you likely have a preference for the read/write learning modality. One of the most popular modes of learning for teachers and students, this category comprises “text-based input and output,” such as reading and writing assignments, essays, reports and manuals. Commonly relied on resources for read/write learners include dictionaries, quotations, the internet, PowerPoint, and lists.

Study strategies for students who prefer this learning style include reading textbooks; taking good notes; and choosing courses which focus on writing assignments.

 

4. Kinesthetic (K)

Do you learn best by doing? If so, your preference may be the increasingly prevalent kinesthetic model, which prioritizes the use of experience and practice over concepts and theory. According to VARK-Learn, “people who prefer this mode are connected to reality, either through concrete personal experiences, examples, practice or simulation.”  This active, tactile approach includes everything from demonstrations and simulations to videos and movies. Case studies, applications and practice (either real or simulated) are also preferred kinesthetic learning methods.

Kinesthetic learning can be particularly valuable to STEM students, according to edutopia, because it helps them breach mental barriers, accept different approaches to information, and ultimately assume a more “receptive state required for learning.”

Manipulative study strategies work well for kinesthetic learners, including writing, making visuals and models, using your fingers, and preparing index cards. Furthermore, incorporating movement while studying -- from chewing gum to tapping your pencil -- can help support focus and attention.

One last thing to keep in mind? Learning styles aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, research indicates that many students amalgamate a mix of learning styles. Even better? There’s no proof that a single learning style or combination of learning styles is more effective or less effective than another. Rather, it’s all about what works best for you.

 

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Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[db_lead] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[text] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

About Learning Styles

According to an article published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the term learning style “refers to the fact that each person has a different way of accumulating knowledge.” This concept was first proposed in the 1970s, with a number of different models emerging to represent the way researchers believe human beings learn.

It’s important to note that while learning styles may indeed reflect individual preferences for how information is received, there’s no conclusive evidence indicating that identifying a person’s preferred learning style impacts outcomes. Still, many schools assess learning styles to help teachers and students alike better understand the process.

Understanding Learning Styles

Proposed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, the VARK model is one of the most commonly accepted classifications of learning styles. It comprises four modalities, including the following:

 

1. Visual (V)

Do you feel like you learn better through graphics? If so, you may be a visual learner. This mode includes the depiction of information via “maps, spider diagrams, charts, graphs, flow charts, labeled diagrams, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices, that people use to represent what could have been presented in words.”

Visual learning methods typically include patterns, shapes, designs and whitespace, but do not include pictures, photographs, videos, movies or even PowerPoint presentations. While words in boxes may be preferable for different types of learners, visual learners prefer that information be conveyed via diagrams, meaningful symbols, and other graphic formats.

For visual learners, seeking out courses which incorporate lots of visuals is a great start. Drawing visuals of problems; using graphing calculators; and developing your own visual aids, such as cognitive maps and charts, can further enrich your learning experience.

 

2. Aural/Auditory (A)

Do you feel like you take in information better when you hear it spoken aloud or say it out loud to yourself? If so, you may be an aural/auditory learner. According to VARK-Learn’s definition, individuals in this category learn best from “lectures, group discussion, radio, email, using mobile phones, speaking, web-chat and talking things through.”

Also included in this learning mode? Email -- because it is often conveyed and received “chat-style.” Aural/auditory learners also prefer sorting out their thoughts and questions aloud -- often repeating what they’ve heard aloud in their own words.

If you fall into the aural/auditory learning mode category, recommended study strategies include attending lectures; reading textbook information aloud; recording text materials as well as lectures; and choosing classes with opportunities for oral discussion.

 

3. Read/Write (R)

Are you all about words? Do you remember what you read better than what you hear? If so, you likely have a preference for the read/write learning modality. One of the most popular modes of learning for teachers and students, this category comprises “text-based input and output,” such as reading and writing assignments, essays, reports and manuals. Commonly relied on resources for read/write learners include dictionaries, quotations, the internet, PowerPoint, and lists.

Study strategies for students who prefer this learning style include reading textbooks; taking good notes; and choosing courses which focus on writing assignments.

 

4. Kinesthetic (K)

Do you learn best by doing? If so, your preference may be the increasingly prevalent kinesthetic model, which prioritizes the use of experience and practice over concepts and theory. According to VARK-Learn, “people who prefer this mode are connected to reality, either through concrete personal experiences, examples, practice or simulation.”  This active, tactile approach includes everything from demonstrations and simulations to videos and movies. Case studies, applications and practice (either real or simulated) are also preferred kinesthetic learning methods.

Kinesthetic learning can be particularly valuable to STEM students, according to edutopia, because it helps them breach mental barriers, accept different approaches to information, and ultimately assume a more “receptive state required for learning.”

Manipulative study strategies work well for kinesthetic learners, including writing, making visuals and models, using your fingers, and preparing index cards. Furthermore, incorporating movement while studying -- from chewing gum to tapping your pencil -- can help support focus and attention.

One last thing to keep in mind? Learning styles aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, research indicates that many students amalgamate a mix of learning styles. Even better? There’s no proof that a single learning style or combination of learning styles is more effective or less effective than another. Rather, it’s all about what works best for you.

 

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Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[text] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and business person may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

 

1. Perfusionist

Never heard of this job before? Neither had we until we stumbled upon someone enthusing over it on Reddit. So what is a perfusionist? Also known as a cardiovascular perfusionist or clinical perfusionist, these specialized healthcare professionals are a critical part of any cardiothoracic team. Perfusionists are trained in operating heart-lung machines, which are used to temporarily replace both circulatory and respiratory function during cardiac surgery.

While this job can be stressful, it’s also incredibly fulfilling as perfusionists are directly involved in life-saving procedures. You can expect to be well-rewarded financially, as well: Experienced perfusionists can earn upwards of $100,000 a year.

You also can’t go wrong with this job in terms of security. As the population ages, the American Society for Extracorporeal Technology anticipates that demand will continue to rise for certified perfusionists.

 

2. Technical Writer

Technical companies may have amazing products and services, but if they can’t communicate their use to the public in an understandable way, they are unlikely to succeed. Enter technical writers.

These detail-oriented professionals typically have a combination of strong writing and critical thinking skills, along with a technical background which qualifies them to translate complex scientific or technical information in a coherent way. Technical writers work in a variety of industries with engineering and computer companies particularly in need of their services.

 

3. Accent Reduction Specialist

You may have never heard of accent reduction specialists before, but these professionals scored the top spot on a CNN roundup of “10 little-known fields with great job opportunities.”

So what do accent reduction specialists do? Simply put, they help people with strong accents and/or poor language skills learn to communicate better in order to break down barriers, change perception, and promote understanding. And while accent reduction specialists work with people with regional accents, their services are expected to be increasingly in demand with the globalization of the economy.

No formal certification is necessary to work in this field, but many accent reduction specialists begin their careers with an associate or bachelor’s degree in speech. Advanced studies in speech-language pathology, meanwhile, further qualify you to succeed as an accent reduction specialist.

 

4. Court Stenographer

Most people only think of lawyers and judges when they ponder legal careers, but the reality there are many different kinds of professionals working behind the scenes, including court stenographers. The most widely used form of recording court proceedings, stenography is the act of recording spoken words -- either through the use of a stenotype machine or shorthand.

In addition to working inside courtrooms, stenographers can also be found everywhere from corporate work to providing closed captioning services for the hard-of-hearing. Regardless of the setting, speed and accuracy are hallmarks of the best stenographers.

While many court stenographers are employed by legal entities, others work on a freelance basis. Your takeaway? If the thought of making your own schedule and working independently appeals to you, then you may have a bright future in this field -- which was listed by Business Insider as one of “16 Awesome Career Choices That Most College Kids Have Never Heard Of.”

 

5. Blacksmith

Also earning a spot on Business Insider’s list? Blacksmiths. Many people mistakenly assume that this craft -- which involves shaping iron and steel by forging them in fire --  is no longer practiced, but metalsmithing is very much alive and well today.

Blacksmithing involves far more than making horseshoes. It’s also a wonderful way to express your creativity. In fact, for people who enjoy design, working with their hands, and interacting with others, blacksmithing offers up a compelling counterpoint to an office job.

Wondering how to get started in blacksmithing? Programs like Fleming College’s Visual and Creative Arts Diploma (VCAD) offer exposure to foundational courses as well as studio-based learning and techniques in blacksmithing and other electives.

While conventional careers have plenty to offer, they can also be less-than-exciting, especially if you land on them by default. By researching as many potential career pathways as possible, you can ensure that you choose the one most likely to help you find fulfillment -- even if it comes from an unlikely or unexpected source.

,[link_description] => ,[meta_description] => ,[meta_keywords] => Careers,[aproved_enum] => NO,[published_at] => 2016-11-02 17:22:26,[editingSource_enum] => MasterStudies),[] => ,[cover_photo] => ,[idType] => 75,[idProvider] => 0,[ntype] => ,[news_type] => article,[head_title] => ,[lead] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[db_lead] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[text] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and business person may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

 

1. Perfusionist

Never heard of this job before? Neither had we until we stumbled upon someone enthusing over it on Reddit. So what is a perfusionist? Also known as a cardiovascular perfusionist or clinical perfusionist, these specialized healthcare professionals are a critical part of any cardiothoracic team. Perfusionists are trained in operating heart-lung machines, which are used to temporarily replace both circulatory and respiratory function during cardiac surgery.

While this job can be stressful, it’s also incredibly fulfilling as perfusionists are directly involved in life-saving procedures. You can expect to be well-rewarded financially, as well: Experienced perfusionists can earn upwards of $100,000 a year.

You also can’t go wrong with this job in terms of security. As the population ages, the American Society for Extracorporeal Technology anticipates that demand will continue to rise for certified perfusionists.

 

2. Technical Writer

Technical companies may have amazing products and services, but if they can’t communicate their use to the public in an understandable way, they are unlikely to succeed. Enter technical writers.

These detail-oriented professionals typically have a combination of strong writing and critical thinking skills, along with a technical background which qualifies them to translate complex scientific or technical information in a coherent way. Technical writers work in a variety of industries with engineering and computer companies particularly in need of their services.

 

3. Accent Reduction Specialist

You may have never heard of accent reduction specialists before, but these professionals scored the top spot on a CNN roundup of “10 little-known fields with great job opportunities.”

So what do accent reduction specialists do? Simply put, they help people with strong accents and/or poor language skills learn to communicate better in order to break down barriers, change perception, and promote understanding. And while accent reduction specialists work with people with regional accents, their services are expected to be increasingly in demand with the globalization of the economy.

No formal certification is necessary to work in this field, but many accent reduction specialists begin their careers with an associate or bachelor’s degree in speech. Advanced studies in speech-language pathology, meanwhile, further qualify you to succeed as an accent reduction specialist.

 

4. Court Stenographer

Most people only think of lawyers and judges when they ponder legal careers, but the reality there are many different kinds of professionals working behind the scenes, including court stenographers. The most widely used form of recording court proceedings, stenography is the act of recording spoken words -- either through the use of a stenotype machine or shorthand.

In addition to working inside courtrooms, stenographers can also be found everywhere from corporate work to providing closed captioning services for the hard-of-hearing. Regardless of the setting, speed and accuracy are hallmarks of the best stenographers.

While many court stenographers are employed by legal entities, others work on a freelance basis. Your takeaway? If the thought of making your own schedule and working independently appeals to you, then you may have a bright future in this field -- which was listed by Business Insider as one of “16 Awesome Career Choices That Most College Kids Have Never Heard Of.”

 

5. Blacksmith

Also earning a spot on Business Insider’s list? Blacksmiths. Many people mistakenly assume that this craft -- which involves shaping iron and steel by forging them in fire --  is no longer practiced, but metalsmithing is very much alive and well today.

Blacksmithing involves far more than making horseshoes. It’s also a wonderful way to express your creativity. In fact, for people who enjoy design, working with their hands, and interacting with others, blacksmithing offers up a compelling counterpoint to an office job.

Wondering how to get started in blacksmithing? Programs like Fleming College’s Visual and Creative Arts Diploma (VCAD) offer exposure to foundational courses as well as studio-based learning and techniques in blacksmithing and other electives.

While conventional careers have plenty to offer, they can also be less-than-exciting, especially if you land on them by default. By researching as many potential career pathways as possible, you can ensure that you choose the one most likely to help you find fulfillment -- even if it comes from an unlikely or unexpected source.

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[db_lead] =>

Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[db_lead] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[text] =>

Probably not.  But it certainly can buy some peace of mind—especially when we’re talking about student debt.  A recent study from Purdue University suggests that while a certain income level may make you happy, you need to factor in debt to understand your overall happiness. 

Louis Tay, assistant professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University determined that “carrying student loan debt is almost as important as income in predicting financial worry and life satisfaction.”  Tay and his researchers, Cassondra Batz, Scott Parrigon, and Lauren Kuykendall, published the study in the Journal of Happiness Studies; they used an online college alumni sample of 2,781 people from the US.   Most students graduated in 2008, and have been carrying student debt for the past seven years.  Tay looked at relationships among average household income, student loan amount, life satisfaction, and sense of financial stress.  “We always think about how much income you can earn, but the reality is you can’t guarantee what you will earn post-college,” he said.  “There is a lot in the news about reducing, balancing, or managing college student debt, and this study shows the burden it can take on one’s life for the long term.”

Their findings?  The financial strain caused by student debt lowers your sense of well-being.  “A lot of people are pursuing a college education, which is a good thing,” said Tay.  “However, the financial cost of doing so also needs to be considered… There large loan numbers can sometimes be thrown around without us actually realizing [the] day-to-day impact on our lives.  We are now translating student loan debt to actual psychological and emotional burden.”

Your takeaway?  The key to your future happiness may lie in the amount of debt you already have—and are willing to take on.  Think carefully about your options and how you want your debt to influence your well-being.

Learn more about studying in the US

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Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[db_lead] =>

Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[text] =>

Probably not.  But it certainly can buy some peace of mind—especially when we’re talking about student debt.  A recent study from Purdue University suggests that while a certain income level may make you happy, you need to factor in debt to understand your overall happiness. 

Louis Tay, assistant professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University determined that “carrying student loan debt is almost as important as income in predicting financial worry and life satisfaction.”  Tay and his researchers, Cassondra Batz, Scott Parrigon, and Lauren Kuykendall, published the study in the Journal of Happiness Studies; they used an online college alumni sample of 2,781 people from the US.   Most students graduated in 2008, and have been carrying student debt for the past seven years.  Tay looked at relationships among average household income, student loan amount, life satisfaction, and sense of financial stress.  “We always think about how much income you can earn, but the reality is you can’t guarantee what you will earn post-college,” he said.  “There is a lot in the news about reducing, balancing, or managing college student debt, and this study shows the burden it can take on one’s life for the long term.”

Their findings?  The financial strain caused by student debt lowers your sense of well-being.  “A lot of people are pursuing a college education, which is a good thing,” said Tay.  “However, the financial cost of doing so also needs to be considered… There large loan numbers can sometimes be thrown around without us actually realizing [the] day-to-day impact on our lives.  We are now translating student loan debt to actual psychological and emotional burden.”

Your takeaway?  The key to your future happiness may lie in the amount of debt you already have—and are willing to take on.  Think carefully about your options and how you want your debt to influence your well-being.

Learn more about studying in the US

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Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[text] =>

From academic help to student life, and visas requirements to housing options, International Student Services offices around the world work hard to welcome and support international students from all walks of life.  Finding a university that matches your interests—and your needs—as an international student takes a bit of work.  We’ve put together a list of several factors for international students to consider when evaluating a prospective university.  Take a closer look. 

 

1. Numbers of Students

Generally speaking, if there are more international students on a campus, there are probably more resources.  At schools with big international populations, like Polk State College, or Centennial College, you can expect to find services for admissions counseling, social services, financial aid help, and mentoring programs.  One downside?  Make sure schools with larger international student populations have the services that match the numbers, otherwise you may experience a backlog and not get the help when you need it. 

Consider the benefits of schools with a small international student population, like Vilnius Business College in Lithuania or West Hills College in the US.  Just because a university, like the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, has a small international population doesn’t mean that there are no services.  It might just mean that the university has a smaller International Student Services office. Even small schools—some with as little as .5 percent of its population made up of international students—have services to help students with visas, travel, accommodations, the academic calendar, and familiarizing themselves with the community.  You might also get more personalized attention than you would at a larger school.

 

2. Mentoring Systems

Think about how a university welcomes its international students from the get-go. International students at top-rated Lund University in Sweden are greeted by student mentors and staff when they arrive at the airport.  Then they attend a fun social event where they meet other international students, and some of the faculty and staff in their programs.  Lund’s two-week orientation for all students combines special topics for international students on Swedish culture and food. Scotland’s University of Glasgow offers international students a similar welcome—and continued support with programs on Scotland’s history, and even workshops on budgeting and saving.

Why is this important?  You won’t succeed if you don’t feel welcomed by your new community.  Look for a school that works to welcome you and to continue to help you acclimate to your new school.

 

3. International Students Associations

Are there any on campus?  You’ll need more than just an International Student Services office—you’ll need the support of other international students. North Iowa Area Community College features an International Students and Friends Club for international and migrant students, as well as domestic students who want to get involved with the college’s international community. MIT is another example of a campus with a vibrant International Student Association.  In an effort to provide learning opportunities for all of its students, MIT allows domestic students to join the association also.  Their goal?  To promote cultural diversity on campus.  Not only to they offer delicious study breaks and fun trips, they also encourage students to get involved on their campus and the local community. 

 

4. Housing Help

You make “home” wherever you go in this world.  It’s nice to have help, especially when you’re not just new to the school, but new to the country, too.  Your International Student Office, like the ones at Western Iowa Tech Community College, College of Southern Idaho or Bifröst University in Iceland, should be able to direct you to on-campus options—and should also put you in touch with other students, faculty, and even local families who may have rooms or apartments for rent.  Think about what you want and how much money you want to spend.  If you want to save money, consider renting a room from a local family or a faculty member.  You can also contact your International Student Services office for help in finding a roommate. 

Studying abroad is one of the most exciting options you can consider as a student.   Bottom line?  Do your homework.  Research the schools where you might want to study.  Visit, if you can.  Talk to the staff at the International Student Services offices.  Get a feel for what you want—and focus on what you need. 

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Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[db_lead] =>

Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[text] =>

From academic help to student life, and visas requirements to housing options, International Student Services offices around the world work hard to welcome and support international students from all walks of life.  Finding a university that matches your interests—and your needs—as an international student takes a bit of work.  We’ve put together a list of several factors for international students to consider when evaluating a prospective university.  Take a closer look. 

 

1. Numbers of Students

Generally speaking, if there are more international students on a campus, there are probably more resources.  At schools with big international populations, like Polk State College, or Centennial College, you can expect to find services for admissions counseling, social services, financial aid help, and mentoring programs.  One downside?  Make sure schools with larger international student populations have the services that match the numbers, otherwise you may experience a backlog and not get the help when you need it. 

Consider the benefits of schools with a small international student population, like Vilnius Business College in Lithuania or West Hills College in the US.  Just because a university, like the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, has a small international population doesn’t mean that there are no services.  It might just mean that the university has a smaller International Student Services office. Even small schools—some with as little as .5 percent of its population made up of international students—have services to help students with visas, travel, accommodations, the academic calendar, and familiarizing themselves with the community.  You might also get more personalized attention than you would at a larger school.

 

2. Mentoring Systems

Think about how a university welcomes its international students from the get-go. International students at top-rated Lund University in Sweden are greeted by student mentors and staff when they arrive at the airport.  Then they attend a fun social event where they meet other international students, and some of the faculty and staff in their programs.  Lund’s two-week orientation for all students combines special topics for international students on Swedish culture and food. Scotland’s University of Glasgow offers international students a similar welcome—and continued support with programs on Scotland’s history, and even workshops on budgeting and saving.

Why is this important?  You won’t succeed if you don’t feel welcomed by your new community.  Look for a school that works to welcome you and to continue to help you acclimate to your new school.

 

3. International Students Associations

Are there any on campus?  You’ll need more than just an International Student Services office—you’ll need the support of other international students. North Iowa Area Community College features an International Students and Friends Club for international and migrant students, as well as domestic students who want to get involved with the college’s international community. MIT is another example of a campus with a vibrant International Student Association.  In an effort to provide learning opportunities for all of its students, MIT allows domestic students to join the association also.  Their goal?  To promote cultural diversity on campus.  Not only to they offer delicious study breaks and fun trips, they also encourage students to get involved on their campus and the local community. 

 

4. Housing Help

You make “home” wherever you go in this world.  It’s nice to have help, especially when you’re not just new to the school, but new to the country, too.  Your International Student Office, like the ones at Western Iowa Tech Community College, College of Southern Idaho or Bifröst University in Iceland, should be able to direct you to on-campus options—and should also put you in touch with other students, faculty, and even local families who may have rooms or apartments for rent.  Think about what you want and how much money you want to spend.  If you want to save money, consider renting a room from a local family or a faculty member.  You can also contact your International Student Services office for help in finding a roommate. 

Studying abroad is one of the most exciting options you can consider as a student.   Bottom line?  Do your homework.  Research the schools where you might want to study.  Visit, if you can.  Talk to the staff at the International Student Services offices.  Get a feel for what you want—and focus on what you need. 

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Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[text] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

About Learning Styles

According to an article published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the term learning style “refers to the fact that each person has a different way of accumulating knowledge.” This concept was first proposed in the 1970s, with a number of different models emerging to represent the way researchers believe human beings learn.

It’s important to note that while learning styles may indeed reflect individual preferences for how information is received, there’s no conclusive evidence indicating that identifying a person’s preferred learning style impacts outcomes. Still, many schools assess learning styles to help teachers and students alike better understand the process.

Understanding Learning Styles

Proposed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, the VARK model is one of the most commonly accepted classifications of learning styles. It comprises four modalities, including the following:

 

1. Visual (V)

Do you feel like you learn better through graphics? If so, you may be a visual learner. This mode includes the depiction of information via “maps, spider diagrams, charts, graphs, flow charts, labeled diagrams, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices, that people use to represent what could have been presented in words.”

Visual learning methods typically include patterns, shapes, designs and whitespace, but do not include pictures, photographs, videos, movies or even PowerPoint presentations. While words in boxes may be preferable for different types of learners, visual learners prefer that information be conveyed via diagrams, meaningful symbols, and other graphic formats.

For visual learners, seeking out courses which incorporate lots of visuals is a great start. Drawing visuals of problems; using graphing calculators; and developing your own visual aids, such as cognitive maps and charts, can further enrich your learning experience.

 

2. Aural/Auditory (A)

Do you feel like you take in information better when you hear it spoken aloud or say it out loud to yourself? If so, you may be an aural/auditory learner. According to VARK-Learn’s definition, individuals in this category learn best from “lectures, group discussion, radio, email, using mobile phones, speaking, web-chat and talking things through.”

Also included in this learning mode? Email -- because it is often conveyed and received “chat-style.” Aural/auditory learners also prefer sorting out their thoughts and questions aloud -- often repeating what they’ve heard aloud in their own words.

If you fall into the aural/auditory learning mode category, recommended study strategies include attending lectures; reading textbook information aloud; recording text materials as well as lectures; and choosing classes with opportunities for oral discussion.

 

3. Read/Write (R)

Are you all about words? Do you remember what you read better than what you hear? If so, you likely have a preference for the read/write learning modality. One of the most popular modes of learning for teachers and students, this category comprises “text-based input and output,” such as reading and writing assignments, essays, reports and manuals. Commonly relied on resources for read/write learners include dictionaries, quotations, the internet, PowerPoint, and lists.

Study strategies for students who prefer this learning style include reading textbooks; taking good notes; and choosing courses which focus on writing assignments.

 

4. Kinesthetic (K)

Do you learn best by doing? If so, your preference may be the increasingly prevalent kinesthetic model, which prioritizes the use of experience and practice over concepts and theory. According to VARK-Learn, “people who prefer this mode are connected to reality, either through concrete personal experiences, examples, practice or simulation.”  This active, tactile approach includes everything from demonstrations and simulations to videos and movies. Case studies, applications and practice (either real or simulated) are also preferred kinesthetic learning methods.

Kinesthetic learning can be particularly valuable to STEM students, according to edutopia, because it helps them breach mental barriers, accept different approaches to information, and ultimately assume a more “receptive state required for learning.”

Manipulative study strategies work well for kinesthetic learners, including writing, making visuals and models, using your fingers, and preparing index cards. Furthermore, incorporating movement while studying -- from chewing gum to tapping your pencil -- can help support focus and attention.

One last thing to keep in mind? Learning styles aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, research indicates that many students amalgamate a mix of learning styles. Even better? There’s no proof that a single learning style or combination of learning styles is more effective or less effective than another. Rather, it’s all about what works best for you.

 

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Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[db_lead] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[text] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

About Learning Styles

According to an article published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the term learning style “refers to the fact that each person has a different way of accumulating knowledge.” This concept was first proposed in the 1970s, with a number of different models emerging to represent the way researchers believe human beings learn.

It’s important to note that while learning styles may indeed reflect individual preferences for how information is received, there’s no conclusive evidence indicating that identifying a person’s preferred learning style impacts outcomes. Still, many schools assess learning styles to help teachers and students alike better understand the process.

Understanding Learning Styles

Proposed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, the VARK model is one of the most commonly accepted classifications of learning styles. It comprises four modalities, including the following:

 

1. Visual (V)

Do you feel like you learn better through graphics? If so, you may be a visual learner. This mode includes the depiction of information via “maps, spider diagrams, charts, graphs, flow charts, labeled diagrams, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices, that people use to represent what could have been presented in words.”

Visual learning methods typically include patterns, shapes, designs and whitespace, but do not include pictures, photographs, videos, movies or even PowerPoint presentations. While words in boxes may be preferable for different types of learners, visual learners prefer that information be conveyed via diagrams, meaningful symbols, and other graphic formats.

For visual learners, seeking out courses which incorporate lots of visuals is a great start. Drawing visuals of problems; using graphing calculators; and developing your own visual aids, such as cognitive maps and charts, can further enrich your learning experience.

 

2. Aural/Auditory (A)

Do you feel like you take in information better when you hear it spoken aloud or say it out loud to yourself? If so, you may be an aural/auditory learner. According to VARK-Learn’s definition, individuals in this category learn best from “lectures, group discussion, radio, email, using mobile phones, speaking, web-chat and talking things through.”

Also included in this learning mode? Email -- because it is often conveyed and received “chat-style.” Aural/auditory learners also prefer sorting out their thoughts and questions aloud -- often repeating what they’ve heard aloud in their own words.

If you fall into the aural/auditory learning mode category, recommended study strategies include attending lectures; reading textbook information aloud; recording text materials as well as lectures; and choosing classes with opportunities for oral discussion.

 

3. Read/Write (R)

Are you all about words? Do you remember what you read better than what you hear? If so, you likely have a preference for the read/write learning modality. One of the most popular modes of learning for teachers and students, this category comprises “text-based input and output,” such as reading and writing assignments, essays, reports and manuals. Commonly relied on resources for read/write learners include dictionaries, quotations, the internet, PowerPoint, and lists.

Study strategies for students who prefer this learning style include reading textbooks; taking good notes; and choosing courses which focus on writing assignments.

 

4. Kinesthetic (K)

Do you learn best by doing? If so, your preference may be the increasingly prevalent kinesthetic model, which prioritizes the use of experience and practice over concepts and theory. According to VARK-Learn, “people who prefer this mode are connected to reality, either through concrete personal experiences, examples, practice or simulation.”  This active, tactile approach includes everything from demonstrations and simulations to videos and movies. Case studies, applications and practice (either real or simulated) are also preferred kinesthetic learning methods.

Kinesthetic learning can be particularly valuable to STEM students, according to edutopia, because it helps them breach mental barriers, accept different approaches to information, and ultimately assume a more “receptive state required for learning.”

Manipulative study strategies work well for kinesthetic learners, including writing, making visuals and models, using your fingers, and preparing index cards. Furthermore, incorporating movement while studying -- from chewing gum to tapping your pencil -- can help support focus and attention.

One last thing to keep in mind? Learning styles aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, research indicates that many students amalgamate a mix of learning styles. Even better? There’s no proof that a single learning style or combination of learning styles is more effective or less effective than another. Rather, it’s all about what works best for you.

 

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Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[text] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and business person may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

 

1. Perfusionist

Never heard of this job before? Neither had we until we stumbled upon someone enthusing over it on Reddit. So what is a perfusionist? Also known as a cardiovascular perfusionist or clinical perfusionist, these specialized healthcare professionals are a critical part of any cardiothoracic team. Perfusionists are trained in operating heart-lung machines, which are used to temporarily replace both circulatory and respiratory function during cardiac surgery.

While this job can be stressful, it’s also incredibly fulfilling as perfusionists are directly involved in life-saving procedures. You can expect to be well-rewarded financially, as well: Experienced perfusionists can earn upwards of $100,000 a year.

You also can’t go wrong with this job in terms of security. As the population ages, the American Society for Extracorporeal Technology anticipates that demand will continue to rise for certified perfusionists.

 

2. Technical Writer

Technical companies may have amazing products and services, but if they can’t communicate their use to the public in an understandable way, they are unlikely to succeed. Enter technical writers.

These detail-oriented professionals typically have a combination of strong writing and critical thinking skills, along with a technical background which qualifies them to translate complex scientific or technical information in a coherent way. Technical writers work in a variety of industries with engineering and computer companies particularly in need of their services.

 

3. Accent Reduction Specialist

You may have never heard of accent reduction specialists before, but these professionals scored the top spot on a CNN roundup of “10 little-known fields with great job opportunities.”

So what do accent reduction specialists do? Simply put, they help people with strong accents and/or poor language skills learn to communicate better in order to break down barriers, change perception, and promote understanding. And while accent reduction specialists work with people with regional accents, their services are expected to be increasingly in demand with the globalization of the economy.

No formal certification is necessary to work in this field, but many accent reduction specialists begin their careers with an associate or bachelor’s degree in speech. Advanced studies in speech-language pathology, meanwhile, further qualify you to succeed as an accent reduction specialist.

 

4. Court Stenographer

Most people only think of lawyers and judges when they ponder legal careers, but the reality there are many different kinds of professionals working behind the scenes, including court stenographers. The most widely used form of recording court proceedings, stenography is the act of recording spoken words -- either through the use of a stenotype machine or shorthand.

In addition to working inside courtrooms, stenographers can also be found everywhere from corporate work to providing closed captioning services for the hard-of-hearing. Regardless of the setting, speed and accuracy are hallmarks of the best stenographers.

While many court stenographers are employed by legal entities, others work on a freelance basis. Your takeaway? If the thought of making your own schedule and working independently appeals to you, then you may have a bright future in this field -- which was listed by Business Insider as one of “16 Awesome Career Choices That Most College Kids Have Never Heard Of.”

 

5. Blacksmith

Also earning a spot on Business Insider’s list? Blacksmiths. Many people mistakenly assume that this craft -- which involves shaping iron and steel by forging them in fire --  is no longer practiced, but metalsmithing is very much alive and well today.

Blacksmithing involves far more than making horseshoes. It’s also a wonderful way to express your creativity. In fact, for people who enjoy design, working with their hands, and interacting with others, blacksmithing offers up a compelling counterpoint to an office job.

Wondering how to get started in blacksmithing? Programs like Fleming College’s Visual and Creative Arts Diploma (VCAD) offer exposure to foundational courses as well as studio-based learning and techniques in blacksmithing and other electives.

While conventional careers have plenty to offer, they can also be less-than-exciting, especially if you land on them by default. By researching as many potential career pathways as possible, you can ensure that you choose the one most likely to help you find fulfillment -- even if it comes from an unlikely or unexpected source.

,[link_description] => ,[meta_description] => ,[meta_keywords] => Careers,[aproved_enum] => NO,[published_at] => 2016-11-02 17:22:26,[editingSource_enum] => MasterStudies),[] => ,[cover_photo] => ,[idType] => 75,[idProvider] => 0,[ntype] => ,[news_type] => article,[head_title] => ,[lead] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[db_lead] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[text] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and business person may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

 

1. Perfusionist

Never heard of this job before? Neither had we until we stumbled upon someone enthusing over it on Reddit. So what is a perfusionist? Also known as a cardiovascular perfusionist or clinical perfusionist, these specialized healthcare professionals are a critical part of any cardiothoracic team. Perfusionists are trained in operating heart-lung machines, which are used to temporarily replace both circulatory and respiratory function during cardiac surgery.

While this job can be stressful, it’s also incredibly fulfilling as perfusionists are directly involved in life-saving procedures. You can expect to be well-rewarded financially, as well: Experienced perfusionists can earn upwards of $100,000 a year.

You also can’t go wrong with this job in terms of security. As the population ages, the American Society for Extracorporeal Technology anticipates that demand will continue to rise for certified perfusionists.

 

2. Technical Writer

Technical companies may have amazing products and services, but if they can’t communicate their use to the public in an understandable way, they are unlikely to succeed. Enter technical writers.

These detail-oriented professionals typically have a combination of strong writing and critical thinking skills, along with a technical background which qualifies them to translate complex scientific or technical information in a coherent way. Technical writers work in a variety of industries with engineering and computer companies particularly in need of their services.

 

3. Accent Reduction Specialist

You may have never heard of accent reduction specialists before, but these professionals scored the top spot on a CNN roundup of “10 little-known fields with great job opportunities.”

So what do accent reduction specialists do? Simply put, they help people with strong accents and/or poor language skills learn to communicate better in order to break down barriers, change perception, and promote understanding. And while accent reduction specialists work with people with regional accents, their services are expected to be increasingly in demand with the globalization of the economy.

No formal certification is necessary to work in this field, but many accent reduction specialists begin their careers with an associate or bachelor’s degree in speech. Advanced studies in speech-language pathology, meanwhile, further qualify you to succeed as an accent reduction specialist.

 

4. Court Stenographer

Most people only think of lawyers and judges when they ponder legal careers, but the reality there are many different kinds of professionals working behind the scenes, including court stenographers. The most widely used form of recording court proceedings, stenography is the act of recording spoken words -- either through the use of a stenotype machine or shorthand.

In addition to working inside courtrooms, stenographers can also be found everywhere from corporate work to providing closed captioning services for the hard-of-hearing. Regardless of the setting, speed and accuracy are hallmarks of the best stenographers.

While many court stenographers are employed by legal entities, others work on a freelance basis. Your takeaway? If the thought of making your own schedule and working independently appeals to you, then you may have a bright future in this field -- which was listed by Business Insider as one of “16 Awesome Career Choices That Most College Kids Have Never Heard Of.”

 

5. Blacksmith

Also earning a spot on Business Insider’s list? Blacksmiths. Many people mistakenly assume that this craft -- which involves shaping iron and steel by forging them in fire --  is no longer practiced, but metalsmithing is very much alive and well today.

Blacksmithing involves far more than making horseshoes. It’s also a wonderful way to express your creativity. In fact, for people who enjoy design, working with their hands, and interacting with others, blacksmithing offers up a compelling counterpoint to an office job.

Wondering how to get started in blacksmithing? Programs like Fleming College’s Visual and Creative Arts Diploma (VCAD) offer exposure to foundational courses as well as studio-based learning and techniques in blacksmithing and other electives.

While conventional careers have plenty to offer, they can also be less-than-exciting, especially if you land on them by default. By researching as many potential career pathways as possible, you can ensure that you choose the one most likely to help you find fulfillment -- even if it comes from an unlikely or unexpected source.

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[db_lead] =>

Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[db_lead] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[text] =>

Probably not.  But it certainly can buy some peace of mind—especially when we’re talking about student debt.  A recent study from Purdue University suggests that while a certain income level may make you happy, you need to factor in debt to understand your overall happiness. 

Louis Tay, assistant professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University determined that “carrying student loan debt is almost as important as income in predicting financial worry and life satisfaction.”  Tay and his researchers, Cassondra Batz, Scott Parrigon, and Lauren Kuykendall, published the study in the Journal of Happiness Studies; they used an online college alumni sample of 2,781 people from the US.   Most students graduated in 2008, and have been carrying student debt for the past seven years.  Tay looked at relationships among average household income, student loan amount, life satisfaction, and sense of financial stress.  “We always think about how much income you can earn, but the reality is you can’t guarantee what you will earn post-college,” he said.  “There is a lot in the news about reducing, balancing, or managing college student debt, and this study shows the burden it can take on one’s life for the long term.”

Their findings?  The financial strain caused by student debt lowers your sense of well-being.  “A lot of people are pursuing a college education, which is a good thing,” said Tay.  “However, the financial cost of doing so also needs to be considered… There large loan numbers can sometimes be thrown around without us actually realizing [the] day-to-day impact on our lives.  We are now translating student loan debt to actual psychological and emotional burden.”

Your takeaway?  The key to your future happiness may lie in the amount of debt you already have—and are willing to take on.  Think carefully about your options and how you want your debt to influence your well-being.

Learn more about studying in the US

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Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[db_lead] =>

Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[text] =>

Probably not.  But it certainly can buy some peace of mind—especially when we’re talking about student debt.  A recent study from Purdue University suggests that while a certain income level may make you happy, you need to factor in debt to understand your overall happiness. 

Louis Tay, assistant professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University determined that “carrying student loan debt is almost as important as income in predicting financial worry and life satisfaction.”  Tay and his researchers, Cassondra Batz, Scott Parrigon, and Lauren Kuykendall, published the study in the Journal of Happiness Studies; they used an online college alumni sample of 2,781 people from the US.   Most students graduated in 2008, and have been carrying student debt for the past seven years.  Tay looked at relationships among average household income, student loan amount, life satisfaction, and sense of financial stress.  “We always think about how much income you can earn, but the reality is you can’t guarantee what you will earn post-college,” he said.  “There is a lot in the news about reducing, balancing, or managing college student debt, and this study shows the burden it can take on one’s life for the long term.”

Their findings?  The financial strain caused by student debt lowers your sense of well-being.  “A lot of people are pursuing a college education, which is a good thing,” said Tay.  “However, the financial cost of doing so also needs to be considered… There large loan numbers can sometimes be thrown around without us actually realizing [the] day-to-day impact on our lives.  We are now translating student loan debt to actual psychological and emotional burden.”

Your takeaway?  The key to your future happiness may lie in the amount of debt you already have—and are willing to take on.  Think carefully about your options and how you want your debt to influence your well-being.

Learn more about studying in the US

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Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[text] =>

From academic help to student life, and visas requirements to housing options, International Student Services offices around the world work hard to welcome and support international students from all walks of life.  Finding a university that matches your interests—and your needs—as an international student takes a bit of work.  We’ve put together a list of several factors for international students to consider when evaluating a prospective university.  Take a closer look. 

 

1. Numbers of Students

Generally speaking, if there are more international students on a campus, there are probably more resources.  At schools with big international populations, like Polk State College, or Centennial College, you can expect to find services for admissions counseling, social services, financial aid help, and mentoring programs.  One downside?  Make sure schools with larger international student populations have the services that match the numbers, otherwise you may experience a backlog and not get the help when you need it. 

Consider the benefits of schools with a small international student population, like Vilnius Business College in Lithuania or West Hills College in the US.  Just because a university, like the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, has a small international population doesn’t mean that there are no services.  It might just mean that the university has a smaller International Student Services office. Even small schools—some with as little as .5 percent of its population made up of international students—have services to help students with visas, travel, accommodations, the academic calendar, and familiarizing themselves with the community.  You might also get more personalized attention than you would at a larger school.

 

2. Mentoring Systems

Think about how a university welcomes its international students from the get-go. International students at top-rated Lund University in Sweden are greeted by student mentors and staff when they arrive at the airport.  Then they attend a fun social event where they meet other international students, and some of the faculty and staff in their programs.  Lund’s two-week orientation for all students combines special topics for international students on Swedish culture and food. Scotland’s University of Glasgow offers international students a similar welcome—and continued support with programs on Scotland’s history, and even workshops on budgeting and saving.

Why is this important?  You won’t succeed if you don’t feel welcomed by your new community.  Look for a school that works to welcome you and to continue to help you acclimate to your new school.

 

3. International Students Associations

Are there any on campus?  You’ll need more than just an International Student Services office—you’ll need the support of other international students. North Iowa Area Community College features an International Students and Friends Club for international and migrant students, as well as domestic students who want to get involved with the college’s international community. MIT is another example of a campus with a vibrant International Student Association.  In an effort to provide learning opportunities for all of its students, MIT allows domestic students to join the association also.  Their goal?  To promote cultural diversity on campus.  Not only to they offer delicious study breaks and fun trips, they also encourage students to get involved on their campus and the local community. 

 

4. Housing Help

You make “home” wherever you go in this world.  It’s nice to have help, especially when you’re not just new to the school, but new to the country, too.  Your International Student Office, like the ones at Western Iowa Tech Community College, College of Southern Idaho or Bifröst University in Iceland, should be able to direct you to on-campus options—and should also put you in touch with other students, faculty, and even local families who may have rooms or apartments for rent.  Think about what you want and how much money you want to spend.  If you want to save money, consider renting a room from a local family or a faculty member.  You can also contact your International Student Services office for help in finding a roommate. 

Studying abroad is one of the most exciting options you can consider as a student.   Bottom line?  Do your homework.  Research the schools where you might want to study.  Visit, if you can.  Talk to the staff at the International Student Services offices.  Get a feel for what you want—and focus on what you need. 

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Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[db_lead] =>

Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[text] =>

From academic help to student life, and visas requirements to housing options, International Student Services offices around the world work hard to welcome and support international students from all walks of life.  Finding a university that matches your interests—and your needs—as an international student takes a bit of work.  We’ve put together a list of several factors for international students to consider when evaluating a prospective university.  Take a closer look. 

 

1. Numbers of Students

Generally speaking, if there are more international students on a campus, there are probably more resources.  At schools with big international populations, like Polk State College, or Centennial College, you can expect to find services for admissions counseling, social services, financial aid help, and mentoring programs.  One downside?  Make sure schools with larger international student populations have the services that match the numbers, otherwise you may experience a backlog and not get the help when you need it. 

Consider the benefits of schools with a small international student population, like Vilnius Business College in Lithuania or West Hills College in the US.  Just because a university, like the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, has a small international population doesn’t mean that there are no services.  It might just mean that the university has a smaller International Student Services office. Even small schools—some with as little as .5 percent of its population made up of international students—have services to help students with visas, travel, accommodations, the academic calendar, and familiarizing themselves with the community.  You might also get more personalized attention than you would at a larger school.

 

2. Mentoring Systems

Think about how a university welcomes its international students from the get-go. International students at top-rated Lund University in Sweden are greeted by student mentors and staff when they arrive at the airport.  Then they attend a fun social event where they meet other international students, and some of the faculty and staff in their programs.  Lund’s two-week orientation for all students combines special topics for international students on Swedish culture and food. Scotland’s University of Glasgow offers international students a similar welcome—and continued support with programs on Scotland’s history, and even workshops on budgeting and saving.

Why is this important?  You won’t succeed if you don’t feel welcomed by your new community.  Look for a school that works to welcome you and to continue to help you acclimate to your new school.

 

3. International Students Associations

Are there any on campus?  You’ll need more than just an International Student Services office—you’ll need the support of other international students. North Iowa Area Community College features an International Students and Friends Club for international and migrant students, as well as domestic students who want to get involved with the college’s international community. MIT is another example of a campus with a vibrant International Student Association.  In an effort to provide learning opportunities for all of its students, MIT allows domestic students to join the association also.  Their goal?  To promote cultural diversity on campus.  Not only to they offer delicious study breaks and fun trips, they also encourage students to get involved on their campus and the local community. 

 

4. Housing Help

You make “home” wherever you go in this world.  It’s nice to have help, especially when you’re not just new to the school, but new to the country, too.  Your International Student Office, like the ones at Western Iowa Tech Community College, College of Southern Idaho or Bifröst University in Iceland, should be able to direct you to on-campus options—and should also put you in touch with other students, faculty, and even local families who may have rooms or apartments for rent.  Think about what you want and how much money you want to spend.  If you want to save money, consider renting a room from a local family or a faculty member.  You can also contact your International Student Services office for help in finding a roommate. 

Studying abroad is one of the most exciting options you can consider as a student.   Bottom line?  Do your homework.  Research the schools where you might want to study.  Visit, if you can.  Talk to the staff at the International Student Services offices.  Get a feel for what you want—and focus on what you need. 

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Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[text] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

About Learning Styles

According to an article published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the term learning style “refers to the fact that each person has a different way of accumulating knowledge.” This concept was first proposed in the 1970s, with a number of different models emerging to represent the way researchers believe human beings learn.

It’s important to note that while learning styles may indeed reflect individual preferences for how information is received, there’s no conclusive evidence indicating that identifying a person’s preferred learning style impacts outcomes. Still, many schools assess learning styles to help teachers and students alike better understand the process.

Understanding Learning Styles

Proposed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, the VARK model is one of the most commonly accepted classifications of learning styles. It comprises four modalities, including the following:

 

1. Visual (V)

Do you feel like you learn better through graphics? If so, you may be a visual learner. This mode includes the depiction of information via “maps, spider diagrams, charts, graphs, flow charts, labeled diagrams, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices, that people use to represent what could have been presented in words.”

Visual learning methods typically include patterns, shapes, designs and whitespace, but do not include pictures, photographs, videos, movies or even PowerPoint presentations. While words in boxes may be preferable for different types of learners, visual learners prefer that information be conveyed via diagrams, meaningful symbols, and other graphic formats.

For visual learners, seeking out courses which incorporate lots of visuals is a great start. Drawing visuals of problems; using graphing calculators; and developing your own visual aids, such as cognitive maps and charts, can further enrich your learning experience.

 

2. Aural/Auditory (A)

Do you feel like you take in information better when you hear it spoken aloud or say it out loud to yourself? If so, you may be an aural/auditory learner. According to VARK-Learn’s definition, individuals in this category learn best from “lectures, group discussion, radio, email, using mobile phones, speaking, web-chat and talking things through.”

Also included in this learning mode? Email -- because it is often conveyed and received “chat-style.” Aural/auditory learners also prefer sorting out their thoughts and questions aloud -- often repeating what they’ve heard aloud in their own words.

If you fall into the aural/auditory learning mode category, recommended study strategies include attending lectures; reading textbook information aloud; recording text materials as well as lectures; and choosing classes with opportunities for oral discussion.

 

3. Read/Write (R)

Are you all about words? Do you remember what you read better than what you hear? If so, you likely have a preference for the read/write learning modality. One of the most popular modes of learning for teachers and students, this category comprises “text-based input and output,” such as reading and writing assignments, essays, reports and manuals. Commonly relied on resources for read/write learners include dictionaries, quotations, the internet, PowerPoint, and lists.

Study strategies for students who prefer this learning style include reading textbooks; taking good notes; and choosing courses which focus on writing assignments.

 

4. Kinesthetic (K)

Do you learn best by doing? If so, your preference may be the increasingly prevalent kinesthetic model, which prioritizes the use of experience and practice over concepts and theory. According to VARK-Learn, “people who prefer this mode are connected to reality, either through concrete personal experiences, examples, practice or simulation.”  This active, tactile approach includes everything from demonstrations and simulations to videos and movies. Case studies, applications and practice (either real or simulated) are also preferred kinesthetic learning methods.

Kinesthetic learning can be particularly valuable to STEM students, according to edutopia, because it helps them breach mental barriers, accept different approaches to information, and ultimately assume a more “receptive state required for learning.”

Manipulative study strategies work well for kinesthetic learners, including writing, making visuals and models, using your fingers, and preparing index cards. Furthermore, incorporating movement while studying -- from chewing gum to tapping your pencil -- can help support focus and attention.

One last thing to keep in mind? Learning styles aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, research indicates that many students amalgamate a mix of learning styles. Even better? There’s no proof that a single learning style or combination of learning styles is more effective or less effective than another. Rather, it’s all about what works best for you.

 

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Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[db_lead] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[text] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

About Learning Styles

According to an article published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the term learning style “refers to the fact that each person has a different way of accumulating knowledge.” This concept was first proposed in the 1970s, with a number of different models emerging to represent the way researchers believe human beings learn.

It’s important to note that while learning styles may indeed reflect individual preferences for how information is received, there’s no conclusive evidence indicating that identifying a person’s preferred learning style impacts outcomes. Still, many schools assess learning styles to help teachers and students alike better understand the process.

Understanding Learning Styles

Proposed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, the VARK model is one of the most commonly accepted classifications of learning styles. It comprises four modalities, including the following:

 

1. Visual (V)

Do you feel like you learn better through graphics? If so, you may be a visual learner. This mode includes the depiction of information via “maps, spider diagrams, charts, graphs, flow charts, labeled diagrams, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices, that people use to represent what could have been presented in words.”

Visual learning methods typically include patterns, shapes, designs and whitespace, but do not include pictures, photographs, videos, movies or even PowerPoint presentations. While words in boxes may be preferable for different types of learners, visual learners prefer that information be conveyed via diagrams, meaningful symbols, and other graphic formats.

For visual learners, seeking out courses which incorporate lots of visuals is a great start. Drawing visuals of problems; using graphing calculators; and developing your own visual aids, such as cognitive maps and charts, can further enrich your learning experience.

 

2. Aural/Auditory (A)

Do you feel like you take in information better when you hear it spoken aloud or say it out loud to yourself? If so, you may be an aural/auditory learner. According to VARK-Learn’s definition, individuals in this category learn best from “lectures, group discussion, radio, email, using mobile phones, speaking, web-chat and talking things through.”

Also included in this learning mode? Email -- because it is often conveyed and received “chat-style.” Aural/auditory learners also prefer sorting out their thoughts and questions aloud -- often repeating what they’ve heard aloud in their own words.

If you fall into the aural/auditory learning mode category, recommended study strategies include attending lectures; reading textbook information aloud; recording text materials as well as lectures; and choosing classes with opportunities for oral discussion.

 

3. Read/Write (R)

Are you all about words? Do you remember what you read better than what you hear? If so, you likely have a preference for the read/write learning modality. One of the most popular modes of learning for teachers and students, this category comprises “text-based input and output,” such as reading and writing assignments, essays, reports and manuals. Commonly relied on resources for read/write learners include dictionaries, quotations, the internet, PowerPoint, and lists.

Study strategies for students who prefer this learning style include reading textbooks; taking good notes; and choosing courses which focus on writing assignments.

 

4. Kinesthetic (K)

Do you learn best by doing? If so, your preference may be the increasingly prevalent kinesthetic model, which prioritizes the use of experience and practice over concepts and theory. According to VARK-Learn, “people who prefer this mode are connected to reality, either through concrete personal experiences, examples, practice or simulation.”  This active, tactile approach includes everything from demonstrations and simulations to videos and movies. Case studies, applications and practice (either real or simulated) are also preferred kinesthetic learning methods.

Kinesthetic learning can be particularly valuable to STEM students, according to edutopia, because it helps them breach mental barriers, accept different approaches to information, and ultimately assume a more “receptive state required for learning.”

Manipulative study strategies work well for kinesthetic learners, including writing, making visuals and models, using your fingers, and preparing index cards. Furthermore, incorporating movement while studying -- from chewing gum to tapping your pencil -- can help support focus and attention.

One last thing to keep in mind? Learning styles aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, research indicates that many students amalgamate a mix of learning styles. Even better? There’s no proof that a single learning style or combination of learning styles is more effective or less effective than another. Rather, it’s all about what works best for you.

 

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Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[text] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and business person may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

 

1. Perfusionist

Never heard of this job before? Neither had we until we stumbled upon someone enthusing over it on Reddit. So what is a perfusionist? Also known as a cardiovascular perfusionist or clinical perfusionist, these specialized healthcare professionals are a critical part of any cardiothoracic team. Perfusionists are trained in operating heart-lung machines, which are used to temporarily replace both circulatory and respiratory function during cardiac surgery.

While this job can be stressful, it’s also incredibly fulfilling as perfusionists are directly involved in life-saving procedures. You can expect to be well-rewarded financially, as well: Experienced perfusionists can earn upwards of $100,000 a year.

You also can’t go wrong with this job in terms of security. As the population ages, the American Society for Extracorporeal Technology anticipates that demand will continue to rise for certified perfusionists.

 

2. Technical Writer

Technical companies may have amazing products and services, but if they can’t communicate their use to the public in an understandable way, they are unlikely to succeed. Enter technical writers.

These detail-oriented professionals typically have a combination of strong writing and critical thinking skills, along with a technical background which qualifies them to translate complex scientific or technical information in a coherent way. Technical writers work in a variety of industries with engineering and computer companies particularly in need of their services.

 

3. Accent Reduction Specialist

You may have never heard of accent reduction specialists before, but these professionals scored the top spot on a CNN roundup of “10 little-known fields with great job opportunities.”

So what do accent reduction specialists do? Simply put, they help people with strong accents and/or poor language skills learn to communicate better in order to break down barriers, change perception, and promote understanding. And while accent reduction specialists work with people with regional accents, their services are expected to be increasingly in demand with the globalization of the economy.

No formal certification is necessary to work in this field, but many accent reduction specialists begin their careers with an associate or bachelor’s degree in speech. Advanced studies in speech-language pathology, meanwhile, further qualify you to succeed as an accent reduction specialist.

 

4. Court Stenographer

Most people only think of lawyers and judges when they ponder legal careers, but the reality there are many different kinds of professionals working behind the scenes, including court stenographers. The most widely used form of recording court proceedings, stenography is the act of recording spoken words -- either through the use of a stenotype machine or shorthand.

In addition to working inside courtrooms, stenographers can also be found everywhere from corporate work to providing closed captioning services for the hard-of-hearing. Regardless of the setting, speed and accuracy are hallmarks of the best stenographers.

While many court stenographers are employed by legal entities, others work on a freelance basis. Your takeaway? If the thought of making your own schedule and working independently appeals to you, then you may have a bright future in this field -- which was listed by Business Insider as one of “16 Awesome Career Choices That Most College Kids Have Never Heard Of.”

 

5. Blacksmith

Also earning a spot on Business Insider’s list? Blacksmiths. Many people mistakenly assume that this craft -- which involves shaping iron and steel by forging them in fire --  is no longer practiced, but metalsmithing is very much alive and well today.

Blacksmithing involves far more than making horseshoes. It’s also a wonderful way to express your creativity. In fact, for people who enjoy design, working with their hands, and interacting with others, blacksmithing offers up a compelling counterpoint to an office job.

Wondering how to get started in blacksmithing? Programs like Fleming College’s Visual and Creative Arts Diploma (VCAD) offer exposure to foundational courses as well as studio-based learning and techniques in blacksmithing and other electives.

While conventional careers have plenty to offer, they can also be less-than-exciting, especially if you land on them by default. By researching as many potential career pathways as possible, you can ensure that you choose the one most likely to help you find fulfillment -- even if it comes from an unlikely or unexpected source.

,[link_description] => ,[meta_description] => ,[meta_keywords] => Careers,[aproved_enum] => NO,[published_at] => 2016-11-02 17:22:26,[editingSource_enum] => MasterStudies),[] => ,[cover_photo] => ,[idType] => 75,[idProvider] => 0,[ntype] => ,[news_type] => article,[head_title] => ,[lead] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[db_lead] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[text] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and business person may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

 

1. Perfusionist

Never heard of this job before? Neither had we until we stumbled upon someone enthusing over it on Reddit. So what is a perfusionist? Also known as a cardiovascular perfusionist or clinical perfusionist, these specialized healthcare professionals are a critical part of any cardiothoracic team. Perfusionists are trained in operating heart-lung machines, which are used to temporarily replace both circulatory and respiratory function during cardiac surgery.

While this job can be stressful, it’s also incredibly fulfilling as perfusionists are directly involved in life-saving procedures. You can expect to be well-rewarded financially, as well: Experienced perfusionists can earn upwards of $100,000 a year.

You also can’t go wrong with this job in terms of security. As the population ages, the American Society for Extracorporeal Technology anticipates that demand will continue to rise for certified perfusionists.

 

2. Technical Writer

Technical companies may have amazing products and services, but if they can’t communicate their use to the public in an understandable way, they are unlikely to succeed. Enter technical writers.

These detail-oriented professionals typically have a combination of strong writing and critical thinking skills, along with a technical background which qualifies them to translate complex scientific or technical information in a coherent way. Technical writers work in a variety of industries with engineering and computer companies particularly in need of their services.

 

3. Accent Reduction Specialist

You may have never heard of accent reduction specialists before, but these professionals scored the top spot on a CNN roundup of “10 little-known fields with great job opportunities.”

So what do accent reduction specialists do? Simply put, they help people with strong accents and/or poor language skills learn to communicate better in order to break down barriers, change perception, and promote understanding. And while accent reduction specialists work with people with regional accents, their services are expected to be increasingly in demand with the globalization of the economy.

No formal certification is necessary to work in this field, but many accent reduction specialists begin their careers with an associate or bachelor’s degree in speech. Advanced studies in speech-language pathology, meanwhile, further qualify you to succeed as an accent reduction specialist.

 

4. Court Stenographer

Most people only think of lawyers and judges when they ponder legal careers, but the reality there are many different kinds of professionals working behind the scenes, including court stenographers. The most widely used form of recording court proceedings, stenography is the act of recording spoken words -- either through the use of a stenotype machine or shorthand.

In addition to working inside courtrooms, stenographers can also be found everywhere from corporate work to providing closed captioning services for the hard-of-hearing. Regardless of the setting, speed and accuracy are hallmarks of the best stenographers.

While many court stenographers are employed by legal entities, others work on a freelance basis. Your takeaway? If the thought of making your own schedule and working independently appeals to you, then you may have a bright future in this field -- which was listed by Business Insider as one of “16 Awesome Career Choices That Most College Kids Have Never Heard Of.”

 

5. Blacksmith

Also earning a spot on Business Insider’s list? Blacksmiths. Many people mistakenly assume that this craft -- which involves shaping iron and steel by forging them in fire --  is no longer practiced, but metalsmithing is very much alive and well today.

Blacksmithing involves far more than making horseshoes. It’s also a wonderful way to express your creativity. In fact, for people who enjoy design, working with their hands, and interacting with others, blacksmithing offers up a compelling counterpoint to an office job.

Wondering how to get started in blacksmithing? Programs like Fleming College’s Visual and Creative Arts Diploma (VCAD) offer exposure to foundational courses as well as studio-based learning and techniques in blacksmithing and other electives.

While conventional careers have plenty to offer, they can also be less-than-exciting, especially if you land on them by default. By researching as many potential career pathways as possible, you can ensure that you choose the one most likely to help you find fulfillment -- even if it comes from an unlikely or unexpected source.

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[db_lead] =>

Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[db_lead] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[text] =>

Probably not.  But it certainly can buy some peace of mind—especially when we’re talking about student debt.  A recent study from Purdue University suggests that while a certain income level may make you happy, you need to factor in debt to understand your overall happiness. 

Louis Tay, assistant professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University determined that “carrying student loan debt is almost as important as income in predicting financial worry and life satisfaction.”  Tay and his researchers, Cassondra Batz, Scott Parrigon, and Lauren Kuykendall, published the study in the Journal of Happiness Studies; they used an online college alumni sample of 2,781 people from the US.   Most students graduated in 2008, and have been carrying student debt for the past seven years.  Tay looked at relationships among average household income, student loan amount, life satisfaction, and sense of financial stress.  “We always think about how much income you can earn, but the reality is you can’t guarantee what you will earn post-college,” he said.  “There is a lot in the news about reducing, balancing, or managing college student debt, and this study shows the burden it can take on one’s life for the long term.”

Their findings?  The financial strain caused by student debt lowers your sense of well-being.  “A lot of people are pursuing a college education, which is a good thing,” said Tay.  “However, the financial cost of doing so also needs to be considered… There large loan numbers can sometimes be thrown around without us actually realizing [the] day-to-day impact on our lives.  We are now translating student loan debt to actual psychological and emotional burden.”

Your takeaway?  The key to your future happiness may lie in the amount of debt you already have—and are willing to take on.  Think carefully about your options and how you want your debt to influence your well-being.

Learn more about studying in the US

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Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[db_lead] =>

Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[text] =>

Probably not.  But it certainly can buy some peace of mind—especially when we’re talking about student debt.  A recent study from Purdue University suggests that while a certain income level may make you happy, you need to factor in debt to understand your overall happiness. 

Louis Tay, assistant professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University determined that “carrying student loan debt is almost as important as income in predicting financial worry and life satisfaction.”  Tay and his researchers, Cassondra Batz, Scott Parrigon, and Lauren Kuykendall, published the study in the Journal of Happiness Studies; they used an online college alumni sample of 2,781 people from the US.   Most students graduated in 2008, and have been carrying student debt for the past seven years.  Tay looked at relationships among average household income, student loan amount, life satisfaction, and sense of financial stress.  “We always think about how much income you can earn, but the reality is you can’t guarantee what you will earn post-college,” he said.  “There is a lot in the news about reducing, balancing, or managing college student debt, and this study shows the burden it can take on one’s life for the long term.”

Their findings?  The financial strain caused by student debt lowers your sense of well-being.  “A lot of people are pursuing a college education, which is a good thing,” said Tay.  “However, the financial cost of doing so also needs to be considered… There large loan numbers can sometimes be thrown around without us actually realizing [the] day-to-day impact on our lives.  We are now translating student loan debt to actual psychological and emotional burden.”

Your takeaway?  The key to your future happiness may lie in the amount of debt you already have—and are willing to take on.  Think carefully about your options and how you want your debt to influence your well-being.

Learn more about studying in the US

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Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[text] =>

From academic help to student life, and visas requirements to housing options, International Student Services offices around the world work hard to welcome and support international students from all walks of life.  Finding a university that matches your interests—and your needs—as an international student takes a bit of work.  We’ve put together a list of several factors for international students to consider when evaluating a prospective university.  Take a closer look. 

 

1. Numbers of Students

Generally speaking, if there are more international students on a campus, there are probably more resources.  At schools with big international populations, like Polk State College, or Centennial College, you can expect to find services for admissions counseling, social services, financial aid help, and mentoring programs.  One downside?  Make sure schools with larger international student populations have the services that match the numbers, otherwise you may experience a backlog and not get the help when you need it. 

Consider the benefits of schools with a small international student population, like Vilnius Business College in Lithuania or West Hills College in the US.  Just because a university, like the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, has a small international population doesn’t mean that there are no services.  It might just mean that the university has a smaller International Student Services office. Even small schools—some with as little as .5 percent of its population made up of international students—have services to help students with visas, travel, accommodations, the academic calendar, and familiarizing themselves with the community.  You might also get more personalized attention than you would at a larger school.

 

2. Mentoring Systems

Think about how a university welcomes its international students from the get-go. International students at top-rated Lund University in Sweden are greeted by student mentors and staff when they arrive at the airport.  Then they attend a fun social event where they meet other international students, and some of the faculty and staff in their programs.  Lund’s two-week orientation for all students combines special topics for international students on Swedish culture and food. Scotland’s University of Glasgow offers international students a similar welcome—and continued support with programs on Scotland’s history, and even workshops on budgeting and saving.

Why is this important?  You won’t succeed if you don’t feel welcomed by your new community.  Look for a school that works to welcome you and to continue to help you acclimate to your new school.

 

3. International Students Associations

Are there any on campus?  You’ll need more than just an International Student Services office—you’ll need the support of other international students. North Iowa Area Community College features an International Students and Friends Club for international and migrant students, as well as domestic students who want to get involved with the college’s international community. MIT is another example of a campus with a vibrant International Student Association.  In an effort to provide learning opportunities for all of its students, MIT allows domestic students to join the association also.  Their goal?  To promote cultural diversity on campus.  Not only to they offer delicious study breaks and fun trips, they also encourage students to get involved on their campus and the local community. 

 

4. Housing Help

You make “home” wherever you go in this world.  It’s nice to have help, especially when you’re not just new to the school, but new to the country, too.  Your International Student Office, like the ones at Western Iowa Tech Community College, College of Southern Idaho or Bifröst University in Iceland, should be able to direct you to on-campus options—and should also put you in touch with other students, faculty, and even local families who may have rooms or apartments for rent.  Think about what you want and how much money you want to spend.  If you want to save money, consider renting a room from a local family or a faculty member.  You can also contact your International Student Services office for help in finding a roommate. 

Studying abroad is one of the most exciting options you can consider as a student.   Bottom line?  Do your homework.  Research the schools where you might want to study.  Visit, if you can.  Talk to the staff at the International Student Services offices.  Get a feel for what you want—and focus on what you need. 

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Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[db_lead] =>

Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[text] =>

From academic help to student life, and visas requirements to housing options, International Student Services offices around the world work hard to welcome and support international students from all walks of life.  Finding a university that matches your interests—and your needs—as an international student takes a bit of work.  We’ve put together a list of several factors for international students to consider when evaluating a prospective university.  Take a closer look. 

 

1. Numbers of Students

Generally speaking, if there are more international students on a campus, there are probably more resources.  At schools with big international populations, like Polk State College, or Centennial College, you can expect to find services for admissions counseling, social services, financial aid help, and mentoring programs.  One downside?  Make sure schools with larger international student populations have the services that match the numbers, otherwise you may experience a backlog and not get the help when you need it. 

Consider the benefits of schools with a small international student population, like Vilnius Business College in Lithuania or West Hills College in the US.  Just because a university, like the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, has a small international population doesn’t mean that there are no services.  It might just mean that the university has a smaller International Student Services office. Even small schools—some with as little as .5 percent of its population made up of international students—have services to help students with visas, travel, accommodations, the academic calendar, and familiarizing themselves with the community.  You might also get more personalized attention than you would at a larger school.

 

2. Mentoring Systems

Think about how a university welcomes its international students from the get-go. International students at top-rated Lund University in Sweden are greeted by student mentors and staff when they arrive at the airport.  Then they attend a fun social event where they meet other international students, and some of the faculty and staff in their programs.  Lund’s two-week orientation for all students combines special topics for international students on Swedish culture and food. Scotland’s University of Glasgow offers international students a similar welcome—and continued support with programs on Scotland’s history, and even workshops on budgeting and saving.

Why is this important?  You won’t succeed if you don’t feel welcomed by your new community.  Look for a school that works to welcome you and to continue to help you acclimate to your new school.

 

3. International Students Associations

Are there any on campus?  You’ll need more than just an International Student Services office—you’ll need the support of other international students. North Iowa Area Community College features an International Students and Friends Club for international and migrant students, as well as domestic students who want to get involved with the college’s international community. MIT is another example of a campus with a vibrant International Student Association.  In an effort to provide learning opportunities for all of its students, MIT allows domestic students to join the association also.  Their goal?  To promote cultural diversity on campus.  Not only to they offer delicious study breaks and fun trips, they also encourage students to get involved on their campus and the local community. 

 

4. Housing Help

You make “home” wherever you go in this world.  It’s nice to have help, especially when you’re not just new to the school, but new to the country, too.  Your International Student Office, like the ones at Western Iowa Tech Community College, College of Southern Idaho or Bifröst University in Iceland, should be able to direct you to on-campus options—and should also put you in touch with other students, faculty, and even local families who may have rooms or apartments for rent.  Think about what you want and how much money you want to spend.  If you want to save money, consider renting a room from a local family or a faculty member.  You can also contact your International Student Services office for help in finding a roommate. 

Studying abroad is one of the most exciting options you can consider as a student.   Bottom line?  Do your homework.  Research the schools where you might want to study.  Visit, if you can.  Talk to the staff at the International Student Services offices.  Get a feel for what you want—and focus on what you need. 

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Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[text] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

About Learning Styles

According to an article published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the term learning style “refers to the fact that each person has a different way of accumulating knowledge.” This concept was first proposed in the 1970s, with a number of different models emerging to represent the way researchers believe human beings learn.

It’s important to note that while learning styles may indeed reflect individual preferences for how information is received, there’s no conclusive evidence indicating that identifying a person’s preferred learning style impacts outcomes. Still, many schools assess learning styles to help teachers and students alike better understand the process.

Understanding Learning Styles

Proposed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, the VARK model is one of the most commonly accepted classifications of learning styles. It comprises four modalities, including the following:

 

1. Visual (V)

Do you feel like you learn better through graphics? If so, you may be a visual learner. This mode includes the depiction of information via “maps, spider diagrams, charts, graphs, flow charts, labeled diagrams, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices, that people use to represent what could have been presented in words.”

Visual learning methods typically include patterns, shapes, designs and whitespace, but do not include pictures, photographs, videos, movies or even PowerPoint presentations. While words in boxes may be preferable for different types of learners, visual learners prefer that information be conveyed via diagrams, meaningful symbols, and other graphic formats.

For visual learners, seeking out courses which incorporate lots of visuals is a great start. Drawing visuals of problems; using graphing calculators; and developing your own visual aids, such as cognitive maps and charts, can further enrich your learning experience.

 

2. Aural/Auditory (A)

Do you feel like you take in information better when you hear it spoken aloud or say it out loud to yourself? If so, you may be an aural/auditory learner. According to VARK-Learn’s definition, individuals in this category learn best from “lectures, group discussion, radio, email, using mobile phones, speaking, web-chat and talking things through.”

Also included in this learning mode? Email -- because it is often conveyed and received “chat-style.” Aural/auditory learners also prefer sorting out their thoughts and questions aloud -- often repeating what they’ve heard aloud in their own words.

If you fall into the aural/auditory learning mode category, recommended study strategies include attending lectures; reading textbook information aloud; recording text materials as well as lectures; and choosing classes with opportunities for oral discussion.

 

3. Read/Write (R)

Are you all about words? Do you remember what you read better than what you hear? If so, you likely have a preference for the read/write learning modality. One of the most popular modes of learning for teachers and students, this category comprises “text-based input and output,” such as reading and writing assignments, essays, reports and manuals. Commonly relied on resources for read/write learners include dictionaries, quotations, the internet, PowerPoint, and lists.

Study strategies for students who prefer this learning style include reading textbooks; taking good notes; and choosing courses which focus on writing assignments.

 

4. Kinesthetic (K)

Do you learn best by doing? If so, your preference may be the increasingly prevalent kinesthetic model, which prioritizes the use of experience and practice over concepts and theory. According to VARK-Learn, “people who prefer this mode are connected to reality, either through concrete personal experiences, examples, practice or simulation.”  This active, tactile approach includes everything from demonstrations and simulations to videos and movies. Case studies, applications and practice (either real or simulated) are also preferred kinesthetic learning methods.

Kinesthetic learning can be particularly valuable to STEM students, according to edutopia, because it helps them breach mental barriers, accept different approaches to information, and ultimately assume a more “receptive state required for learning.”

Manipulative study strategies work well for kinesthetic learners, including writing, making visuals and models, using your fingers, and preparing index cards. Furthermore, incorporating movement while studying -- from chewing gum to tapping your pencil -- can help support focus and attention.

One last thing to keep in mind? Learning styles aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, research indicates that many students amalgamate a mix of learning styles. Even better? There’s no proof that a single learning style or combination of learning styles is more effective or less effective than another. Rather, it’s all about what works best for you.

 

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Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[db_lead] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[text] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

About Learning Styles

According to an article published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the term learning style “refers to the fact that each person has a different way of accumulating knowledge.” This concept was first proposed in the 1970s, with a number of different models emerging to represent the way researchers believe human beings learn.

It’s important to note that while learning styles may indeed reflect individual preferences for how information is received, there’s no conclusive evidence indicating that identifying a person’s preferred learning style impacts outcomes. Still, many schools assess learning styles to help teachers and students alike better understand the process.

Understanding Learning Styles

Proposed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, the VARK model is one of the most commonly accepted classifications of learning styles. It comprises four modalities, including the following:

 

1. Visual (V)

Do you feel like you learn better through graphics? If so, you may be a visual learner. This mode includes the depiction of information via “maps, spider diagrams, charts, graphs, flow charts, labeled diagrams, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices, that people use to represent what could have been presented in words.”

Visual learning methods typically include patterns, shapes, designs and whitespace, but do not include pictures, photographs, videos, movies or even PowerPoint presentations. While words in boxes may be preferable for different types of learners, visual learners prefer that information be conveyed via diagrams, meaningful symbols, and other graphic formats.

For visual learners, seeking out courses which incorporate lots of visuals is a great start. Drawing visuals of problems; using graphing calculators; and developing your own visual aids, such as cognitive maps and charts, can further enrich your learning experience.

 

2. Aural/Auditory (A)

Do you feel like you take in information better when you hear it spoken aloud or say it out loud to yourself? If so, you may be an aural/auditory learner. According to VARK-Learn’s definition, individuals in this category learn best from “lectures, group discussion, radio, email, using mobile phones, speaking, web-chat and talking things through.”

Also included in this learning mode? Email -- because it is often conveyed and received “chat-style.” Aural/auditory learners also prefer sorting out their thoughts and questions aloud -- often repeating what they’ve heard aloud in their own words.

If you fall into the aural/auditory learning mode category, recommended study strategies include attending lectures; reading textbook information aloud; recording text materials as well as lectures; and choosing classes with opportunities for oral discussion.

 

3. Read/Write (R)

Are you all about words? Do you remember what you read better than what you hear? If so, you likely have a preference for the read/write learning modality. One of the most popular modes of learning for teachers and students, this category comprises “text-based input and output,” such as reading and writing assignments, essays, reports and manuals. Commonly relied on resources for read/write learners include dictionaries, quotations, the internet, PowerPoint, and lists.

Study strategies for students who prefer this learning style include reading textbooks; taking good notes; and choosing courses which focus on writing assignments.

 

4. Kinesthetic (K)

Do you learn best by doing? If so, your preference may be the increasingly prevalent kinesthetic model, which prioritizes the use of experience and practice over concepts and theory. According to VARK-Learn, “people who prefer this mode are connected to reality, either through concrete personal experiences, examples, practice or simulation.”  This active, tactile approach includes everything from demonstrations and simulations to videos and movies. Case studies, applications and practice (either real or simulated) are also preferred kinesthetic learning methods.

Kinesthetic learning can be particularly valuable to STEM students, according to edutopia, because it helps them breach mental barriers, accept different approaches to information, and ultimately assume a more “receptive state required for learning.”

Manipulative study strategies work well for kinesthetic learners, including writing, making visuals and models, using your fingers, and preparing index cards. Furthermore, incorporating movement while studying -- from chewing gum to tapping your pencil -- can help support focus and attention.

One last thing to keep in mind? Learning styles aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, research indicates that many students amalgamate a mix of learning styles. Even better? There’s no proof that a single learning style or combination of learning styles is more effective or less effective than another. Rather, it’s all about what works best for you.

 

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Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[text] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and business person may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

 

1. Perfusionist

Never heard of this job before? Neither had we until we stumbled upon someone enthusing over it on Reddit. So what is a perfusionist? Also known as a cardiovascular perfusionist or clinical perfusionist, these specialized healthcare professionals are a critical part of any cardiothoracic team. Perfusionists are trained in operating heart-lung machines, which are used to temporarily replace both circulatory and respiratory function during cardiac surgery.

While this job can be stressful, it’s also incredibly fulfilling as perfusionists are directly involved in life-saving procedures. You can expect to be well-rewarded financially, as well: Experienced perfusionists can earn upwards of $100,000 a year.

You also can’t go wrong with this job in terms of security. As the population ages, the American Society for Extracorporeal Technology anticipates that demand will continue to rise for certified perfusionists.

 

2. Technical Writer

Technical companies may have amazing products and services, but if they can’t communicate their use to the public in an understandable way, they are unlikely to succeed. Enter technical writers.

These detail-oriented professionals typically have a combination of strong writing and critical thinking skills, along with a technical background which qualifies them to translate complex scientific or technical information in a coherent way. Technical writers work in a variety of industries with engineering and computer companies particularly in need of their services.

 

3. Accent Reduction Specialist

You may have never heard of accent reduction specialists before, but these professionals scored the top spot on a CNN roundup of “10 little-known fields with great job opportunities.”

So what do accent reduction specialists do? Simply put, they help people with strong accents and/or poor language skills learn to communicate better in order to break down barriers, change perception, and promote understanding. And while accent reduction specialists work with people with regional accents, their services are expected to be increasingly in demand with the globalization of the economy.

No formal certification is necessary to work in this field, but many accent reduction specialists begin their careers with an associate or bachelor’s degree in speech. Advanced studies in speech-language pathology, meanwhile, further qualify you to succeed as an accent reduction specialist.

 

4. Court Stenographer

Most people only think of lawyers and judges when they ponder legal careers, but the reality there are many different kinds of professionals working behind the scenes, including court stenographers. The most widely used form of recording court proceedings, stenography is the act of recording spoken words -- either through the use of a stenotype machine or shorthand.

In addition to working inside courtrooms, stenographers can also be found everywhere from corporate work to providing closed captioning services for the hard-of-hearing. Regardless of the setting, speed and accuracy are hallmarks of the best stenographers.

While many court stenographers are employed by legal entities, others work on a freelance basis. Your takeaway? If the thought of making your own schedule and working independently appeals to you, then you may have a bright future in this field -- which was listed by Business Insider as one of “16 Awesome Career Choices That Most College Kids Have Never Heard Of.”

 

5. Blacksmith

Also earning a spot on Business Insider’s list? Blacksmiths. Many people mistakenly assume that this craft -- which involves shaping iron and steel by forging them in fire --  is no longer practiced, but metalsmithing is very much alive and well today.

Blacksmithing involves far more than making horseshoes. It’s also a wonderful way to express your creativity. In fact, for people who enjoy design, working with their hands, and interacting with others, blacksmithing offers up a compelling counterpoint to an office job.

Wondering how to get started in blacksmithing? Programs like Fleming College’s Visual and Creative Arts Diploma (VCAD) offer exposure to foundational courses as well as studio-based learning and techniques in blacksmithing and other electives.

While conventional careers have plenty to offer, they can also be less-than-exciting, especially if you land on them by default. By researching as many potential career pathways as possible, you can ensure that you choose the one most likely to help you find fulfillment -- even if it comes from an unlikely or unexpected source.

,[link_description] => ,[meta_description] => ,[meta_keywords] => Careers,[aproved_enum] => NO,[published_at] => 2016-11-02 17:22:26,[editingSource_enum] => MasterStudies),[] => ,[cover_photo] => ,[idType] => 75,[idProvider] => 0,[ntype] => ,[news_type] => article,[head_title] => ,[lead] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[db_lead] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[text] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and business person may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

 

1. Perfusionist

Never heard of this job before? Neither had we until we stumbled upon someone enthusing over it on Reddit. So what is a perfusionist? Also known as a cardiovascular perfusionist or clinical perfusionist, these specialized healthcare professionals are a critical part of any cardiothoracic team. Perfusionists are trained in operating heart-lung machines, which are used to temporarily replace both circulatory and respiratory function during cardiac surgery.

While this job can be stressful, it’s also incredibly fulfilling as perfusionists are directly involved in life-saving procedures. You can expect to be well-rewarded financially, as well: Experienced perfusionists can earn upwards of $100,000 a year.

You also can’t go wrong with this job in terms of security. As the population ages, the American Society for Extracorporeal Technology anticipates that demand will continue to rise for certified perfusionists.

 

2. Technical Writer

Technical companies may have amazing products and services, but if they can’t communicate their use to the public in an understandable way, they are unlikely to succeed. Enter technical writers.

These detail-oriented professionals typically have a combination of strong writing and critical thinking skills, along with a technical background which qualifies them to translate complex scientific or technical information in a coherent way. Technical writers work in a variety of industries with engineering and computer companies particularly in need of their services.

 

3. Accent Reduction Specialist

You may have never heard of accent reduction specialists before, but these professionals scored the top spot on a CNN roundup of “10 little-known fields with great job opportunities.”

So what do accent reduction specialists do? Simply put, they help people with strong accents and/or poor language skills learn to communicate better in order to break down barriers, change perception, and promote understanding. And while accent reduction specialists work with people with regional accents, their services are expected to be increasingly in demand with the globalization of the economy.

No formal certification is necessary to work in this field, but many accent reduction specialists begin their careers with an associate or bachelor’s degree in speech. Advanced studies in speech-language pathology, meanwhile, further qualify you to succeed as an accent reduction specialist.

 

4. Court Stenographer

Most people only think of lawyers and judges when they ponder legal careers, but the reality there are many different kinds of professionals working behind the scenes, including court stenographers. The most widely used form of recording court proceedings, stenography is the act of recording spoken words -- either through the use of a stenotype machine or shorthand.

In addition to working inside courtrooms, stenographers can also be found everywhere from corporate work to providing closed captioning services for the hard-of-hearing. Regardless of the setting, speed and accuracy are hallmarks of the best stenographers.

While many court stenographers are employed by legal entities, others work on a freelance basis. Your takeaway? If the thought of making your own schedule and working independently appeals to you, then you may have a bright future in this field -- which was listed by Business Insider as one of “16 Awesome Career Choices That Most College Kids Have Never Heard Of.”

 

5. Blacksmith

Also earning a spot on Business Insider’s list? Blacksmiths. Many people mistakenly assume that this craft -- which involves shaping iron and steel by forging them in fire --  is no longer practiced, but metalsmithing is very much alive and well today.

Blacksmithing involves far more than making horseshoes. It’s also a wonderful way to express your creativity. In fact, for people who enjoy design, working with their hands, and interacting with others, blacksmithing offers up a compelling counterpoint to an office job.

Wondering how to get started in blacksmithing? Programs like Fleming College’s Visual and Creative Arts Diploma (VCAD) offer exposure to foundational courses as well as studio-based learning and techniques in blacksmithing and other electives.

While conventional careers have plenty to offer, they can also be less-than-exciting, especially if you land on them by default. By researching as many potential career pathways as possible, you can ensure that you choose the one most likely to help you find fulfillment -- even if it comes from an unlikely or unexpected source.

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[db_lead] =>

Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[db_lead] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[text] =>

Probably not.  But it certainly can buy some peace of mind—especially when we’re talking about student debt.  A recent study from Purdue University suggests that while a certain income level may make you happy, you need to factor in debt to understand your overall happiness. 

Louis Tay, assistant professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University determined that “carrying student loan debt is almost as important as income in predicting financial worry and life satisfaction.”  Tay and his researchers, Cassondra Batz, Scott Parrigon, and Lauren Kuykendall, published the study in the Journal of Happiness Studies; they used an online college alumni sample of 2,781 people from the US.   Most students graduated in 2008, and have been carrying student debt for the past seven years.  Tay looked at relationships among average household income, student loan amount, life satisfaction, and sense of financial stress.  “We always think about how much income you can earn, but the reality is you can’t guarantee what you will earn post-college,” he said.  “There is a lot in the news about reducing, balancing, or managing college student debt, and this study shows the burden it can take on one’s life for the long term.”

Their findings?  The financial strain caused by student debt lowers your sense of well-being.  “A lot of people are pursuing a college education, which is a good thing,” said Tay.  “However, the financial cost of doing so also needs to be considered… There large loan numbers can sometimes be thrown around without us actually realizing [the] day-to-day impact on our lives.  We are now translating student loan debt to actual psychological and emotional burden.”

Your takeaway?  The key to your future happiness may lie in the amount of debt you already have—and are willing to take on.  Think carefully about your options and how you want your debt to influence your well-being.

Learn more about studying in the US

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Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[db_lead] =>

Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[text] =>

Probably not.  But it certainly can buy some peace of mind—especially when we’re talking about student debt.  A recent study from Purdue University suggests that while a certain income level may make you happy, you need to factor in debt to understand your overall happiness. 

Louis Tay, assistant professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University determined that “carrying student loan debt is almost as important as income in predicting financial worry and life satisfaction.”  Tay and his researchers, Cassondra Batz, Scott Parrigon, and Lauren Kuykendall, published the study in the Journal of Happiness Studies; they used an online college alumni sample of 2,781 people from the US.   Most students graduated in 2008, and have been carrying student debt for the past seven years.  Tay looked at relationships among average household income, student loan amount, life satisfaction, and sense of financial stress.  “We always think about how much income you can earn, but the reality is you can’t guarantee what you will earn post-college,” he said.  “There is a lot in the news about reducing, balancing, or managing college student debt, and this study shows the burden it can take on one’s life for the long term.”

Their findings?  The financial strain caused by student debt lowers your sense of well-being.  “A lot of people are pursuing a college education, which is a good thing,” said Tay.  “However, the financial cost of doing so also needs to be considered… There large loan numbers can sometimes be thrown around without us actually realizing [the] day-to-day impact on our lives.  We are now translating student loan debt to actual psychological and emotional burden.”

Your takeaway?  The key to your future happiness may lie in the amount of debt you already have—and are willing to take on.  Think carefully about your options and how you want your debt to influence your well-being.

Learn more about studying in the US

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Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[text] =>

From academic help to student life, and visas requirements to housing options, International Student Services offices around the world work hard to welcome and support international students from all walks of life.  Finding a university that matches your interests—and your needs—as an international student takes a bit of work.  We’ve put together a list of several factors for international students to consider when evaluating a prospective university.  Take a closer look. 

 

1. Numbers of Students

Generally speaking, if there are more international students on a campus, there are probably more resources.  At schools with big international populations, like Polk State College, or Centennial College, you can expect to find services for admissions counseling, social services, financial aid help, and mentoring programs.  One downside?  Make sure schools with larger international student populations have the services that match the numbers, otherwise you may experience a backlog and not get the help when you need it. 

Consider the benefits of schools with a small international student population, like Vilnius Business College in Lithuania or West Hills College in the US.  Just because a university, like the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, has a small international population doesn’t mean that there are no services.  It might just mean that the university has a smaller International Student Services office. Even small schools—some with as little as .5 percent of its population made up of international students—have services to help students with visas, travel, accommodations, the academic calendar, and familiarizing themselves with the community.  You might also get more personalized attention than you would at a larger school.

 

2. Mentoring Systems

Think about how a university welcomes its international students from the get-go. International students at top-rated Lund University in Sweden are greeted by student mentors and staff when they arrive at the airport.  Then they attend a fun social event where they meet other international students, and some of the faculty and staff in their programs.  Lund’s two-week orientation for all students combines special topics for international students on Swedish culture and food. Scotland’s University of Glasgow offers international students a similar welcome—and continued support with programs on Scotland’s history, and even workshops on budgeting and saving.

Why is this important?  You won’t succeed if you don’t feel welcomed by your new community.  Look for a school that works to welcome you and to continue to help you acclimate to your new school.

 

3. International Students Associations

Are there any on campus?  You’ll need more than just an International Student Services office—you’ll need the support of other international students. North Iowa Area Community College features an International Students and Friends Club for international and migrant students, as well as domestic students who want to get involved with the college’s international community. MIT is another example of a campus with a vibrant International Student Association.  In an effort to provide learning opportunities for all of its students, MIT allows domestic students to join the association also.  Their goal?  To promote cultural diversity on campus.  Not only to they offer delicious study breaks and fun trips, they also encourage students to get involved on their campus and the local community. 

 

4. Housing Help

You make “home” wherever you go in this world.  It’s nice to have help, especially when you’re not just new to the school, but new to the country, too.  Your International Student Office, like the ones at Western Iowa Tech Community College, College of Southern Idaho or Bifröst University in Iceland, should be able to direct you to on-campus options—and should also put you in touch with other students, faculty, and even local families who may have rooms or apartments for rent.  Think about what you want and how much money you want to spend.  If you want to save money, consider renting a room from a local family or a faculty member.  You can also contact your International Student Services office for help in finding a roommate. 

Studying abroad is one of the most exciting options you can consider as a student.   Bottom line?  Do your homework.  Research the schools where you might want to study.  Visit, if you can.  Talk to the staff at the International Student Services offices.  Get a feel for what you want—and focus on what you need. 

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Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[db_lead] =>

Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[text] =>

From academic help to student life, and visas requirements to housing options, International Student Services offices around the world work hard to welcome and support international students from all walks of life.  Finding a university that matches your interests—and your needs—as an international student takes a bit of work.  We’ve put together a list of several factors for international students to consider when evaluating a prospective university.  Take a closer look. 

 

1. Numbers of Students

Generally speaking, if there are more international students on a campus, there are probably more resources.  At schools with big international populations, like Polk State College, or Centennial College, you can expect to find services for admissions counseling, social services, financial aid help, and mentoring programs.  One downside?  Make sure schools with larger international student populations have the services that match the numbers, otherwise you may experience a backlog and not get the help when you need it. 

Consider the benefits of schools with a small international student population, like Vilnius Business College in Lithuania or West Hills College in the US.  Just because a university, like the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, has a small international population doesn’t mean that there are no services.  It might just mean that the university has a smaller International Student Services office. Even small schools—some with as little as .5 percent of its population made up of international students—have services to help students with visas, travel, accommodations, the academic calendar, and familiarizing themselves with the community.  You might also get more personalized attention than you would at a larger school.

 

2. Mentoring Systems

Think about how a university welcomes its international students from the get-go. International students at top-rated Lund University in Sweden are greeted by student mentors and staff when they arrive at the airport.  Then they attend a fun social event where they meet other international students, and some of the faculty and staff in their programs.  Lund’s two-week orientation for all students combines special topics for international students on Swedish culture and food. Scotland’s University of Glasgow offers international students a similar welcome—and continued support with programs on Scotland’s history, and even workshops on budgeting and saving.

Why is this important?  You won’t succeed if you don’t feel welcomed by your new community.  Look for a school that works to welcome you and to continue to help you acclimate to your new school.

 

3. International Students Associations

Are there any on campus?  You’ll need more than just an International Student Services office—you’ll need the support of other international students. North Iowa Area Community College features an International Students and Friends Club for international and migrant students, as well as domestic students who want to get involved with the college’s international community. MIT is another example of a campus with a vibrant International Student Association.  In an effort to provide learning opportunities for all of its students, MIT allows domestic students to join the association also.  Their goal?  To promote cultural diversity on campus.  Not only to they offer delicious study breaks and fun trips, they also encourage students to get involved on their campus and the local community. 

 

4. Housing Help

You make “home” wherever you go in this world.  It’s nice to have help, especially when you’re not just new to the school, but new to the country, too.  Your International Student Office, like the ones at Western Iowa Tech Community College, College of Southern Idaho or Bifröst University in Iceland, should be able to direct you to on-campus options—and should also put you in touch with other students, faculty, and even local families who may have rooms or apartments for rent.  Think about what you want and how much money you want to spend.  If you want to save money, consider renting a room from a local family or a faculty member.  You can also contact your International Student Services office for help in finding a roommate. 

Studying abroad is one of the most exciting options you can consider as a student.   Bottom line?  Do your homework.  Research the schools where you might want to study.  Visit, if you can.  Talk to the staff at the International Student Services offices.  Get a feel for what you want—and focus on what you need. 

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Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[text] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

About Learning Styles

According to an article published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the term learning style “refers to the fact that each person has a different way of accumulating knowledge.” This concept was first proposed in the 1970s, with a number of different models emerging to represent the way researchers believe human beings learn.

It’s important to note that while learning styles may indeed reflect individual preferences for how information is received, there’s no conclusive evidence indicating that identifying a person’s preferred learning style impacts outcomes. Still, many schools assess learning styles to help teachers and students alike better understand the process.

Understanding Learning Styles

Proposed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, the VARK model is one of the most commonly accepted classifications of learning styles. It comprises four modalities, including the following:

 

1. Visual (V)

Do you feel like you learn better through graphics? If so, you may be a visual learner. This mode includes the depiction of information via “maps, spider diagrams, charts, graphs, flow charts, labeled diagrams, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices, that people use to represent what could have been presented in words.”

Visual learning methods typically include patterns, shapes, designs and whitespace, but do not include pictures, photographs, videos, movies or even PowerPoint presentations. While words in boxes may be preferable for different types of learners, visual learners prefer that information be conveyed via diagrams, meaningful symbols, and other graphic formats.

For visual learners, seeking out courses which incorporate lots of visuals is a great start. Drawing visuals of problems; using graphing calculators; and developing your own visual aids, such as cognitive maps and charts, can further enrich your learning experience.

 

2. Aural/Auditory (A)

Do you feel like you take in information better when you hear it spoken aloud or say it out loud to yourself? If so, you may be an aural/auditory learner. According to VARK-Learn’s definition, individuals in this category learn best from “lectures, group discussion, radio, email, using mobile phones, speaking, web-chat and talking things through.”

Also included in this learning mode? Email -- because it is often conveyed and received “chat-style.” Aural/auditory learners also prefer sorting out their thoughts and questions aloud -- often repeating what they’ve heard aloud in their own words.

If you fall into the aural/auditory learning mode category, recommended study strategies include attending lectures; reading textbook information aloud; recording text materials as well as lectures; and choosing classes with opportunities for oral discussion.

 

3. Read/Write (R)

Are you all about words? Do you remember what you read better than what you hear? If so, you likely have a preference for the read/write learning modality. One of the most popular modes of learning for teachers and students, this category comprises “text-based input and output,” such as reading and writing assignments, essays, reports and manuals. Commonly relied on resources for read/write learners include dictionaries, quotations, the internet, PowerPoint, and lists.

Study strategies for students who prefer this learning style include reading textbooks; taking good notes; and choosing courses which focus on writing assignments.

 

4. Kinesthetic (K)

Do you learn best by doing? If so, your preference may be the increasingly prevalent kinesthetic model, which prioritizes the use of experience and practice over concepts and theory. According to VARK-Learn, “people who prefer this mode are connected to reality, either through concrete personal experiences, examples, practice or simulation.”  This active, tactile approach includes everything from demonstrations and simulations to videos and movies. Case studies, applications and practice (either real or simulated) are also preferred kinesthetic learning methods.

Kinesthetic learning can be particularly valuable to STEM students, according to edutopia, because it helps them breach mental barriers, accept different approaches to information, and ultimately assume a more “receptive state required for learning.”

Manipulative study strategies work well for kinesthetic learners, including writing, making visuals and models, using your fingers, and preparing index cards. Furthermore, incorporating movement while studying -- from chewing gum to tapping your pencil -- can help support focus and attention.

One last thing to keep in mind? Learning styles aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, research indicates that many students amalgamate a mix of learning styles. Even better? There’s no proof that a single learning style or combination of learning styles is more effective or less effective than another. Rather, it’s all about what works best for you.

 

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Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[db_lead] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[text] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

About Learning Styles

According to an article published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the term learning style “refers to the fact that each person has a different way of accumulating knowledge.” This concept was first proposed in the 1970s, with a number of different models emerging to represent the way researchers believe human beings learn.

It’s important to note that while learning styles may indeed reflect individual preferences for how information is received, there’s no conclusive evidence indicating that identifying a person’s preferred learning style impacts outcomes. Still, many schools assess learning styles to help teachers and students alike better understand the process.

Understanding Learning Styles

Proposed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, the VARK model is one of the most commonly accepted classifications of learning styles. It comprises four modalities, including the following:

 

1. Visual (V)

Do you feel like you learn better through graphics? If so, you may be a visual learner. This mode includes the depiction of information via “maps, spider diagrams, charts, graphs, flow charts, labeled diagrams, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices, that people use to represent what could have been presented in words.”

Visual learning methods typically include patterns, shapes, designs and whitespace, but do not include pictures, photographs, videos, movies or even PowerPoint presentations. While words in boxes may be preferable for different types of learners, visual learners prefer that information be conveyed via diagrams, meaningful symbols, and other graphic formats.

For visual learners, seeking out courses which incorporate lots of visuals is a great start. Drawing visuals of problems; using graphing calculators; and developing your own visual aids, such as cognitive maps and charts, can further enrich your learning experience.

 

2. Aural/Auditory (A)

Do you feel like you take in information better when you hear it spoken aloud or say it out loud to yourself? If so, you may be an aural/auditory learner. According to VARK-Learn’s definition, individuals in this category learn best from “lectures, group discussion, radio, email, using mobile phones, speaking, web-chat and talking things through.”

Also included in this learning mode? Email -- because it is often conveyed and received “chat-style.” Aural/auditory learners also prefer sorting out their thoughts and questions aloud -- often repeating what they’ve heard aloud in their own words.

If you fall into the aural/auditory learning mode category, recommended study strategies include attending lectures; reading textbook information aloud; recording text materials as well as lectures; and choosing classes with opportunities for oral discussion.

 

3. Read/Write (R)

Are you all about words? Do you remember what you read better than what you hear? If so, you likely have a preference for the read/write learning modality. One of the most popular modes of learning for teachers and students, this category comprises “text-based input and output,” such as reading and writing assignments, essays, reports and manuals. Commonly relied on resources for read/write learners include dictionaries, quotations, the internet, PowerPoint, and lists.

Study strategies for students who prefer this learning style include reading textbooks; taking good notes; and choosing courses which focus on writing assignments.

 

4. Kinesthetic (K)

Do you learn best by doing? If so, your preference may be the increasingly prevalent kinesthetic model, which prioritizes the use of experience and practice over concepts and theory. According to VARK-Learn, “people who prefer this mode are connected to reality, either through concrete personal experiences, examples, practice or simulation.”  This active, tactile approach includes everything from demonstrations and simulations to videos and movies. Case studies, applications and practice (either real or simulated) are also preferred kinesthetic learning methods.

Kinesthetic learning can be particularly valuable to STEM students, according to edutopia, because it helps them breach mental barriers, accept different approaches to information, and ultimately assume a more “receptive state required for learning.”

Manipulative study strategies work well for kinesthetic learners, including writing, making visuals and models, using your fingers, and preparing index cards. Furthermore, incorporating movement while studying -- from chewing gum to tapping your pencil -- can help support focus and attention.

One last thing to keep in mind? Learning styles aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, research indicates that many students amalgamate a mix of learning styles. Even better? There’s no proof that a single learning style or combination of learning styles is more effective or less effective than another. Rather, it’s all about what works best for you.

 

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Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[text] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and business person may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

 

1. Perfusionist

Never heard of this job before? Neither had we until we stumbled upon someone enthusing over it on Reddit. So what is a perfusionist? Also known as a cardiovascular perfusionist or clinical perfusionist, these specialized healthcare professionals are a critical part of any cardiothoracic team. Perfusionists are trained in operating heart-lung machines, which are used to temporarily replace both circulatory and respiratory function during cardiac surgery.

While this job can be stressful, it’s also incredibly fulfilling as perfusionists are directly involved in life-saving procedures. You can expect to be well-rewarded financially, as well: Experienced perfusionists can earn upwards of $100,000 a year.

You also can’t go wrong with this job in terms of security. As the population ages, the American Society for Extracorporeal Technology anticipates that demand will continue to rise for certified perfusionists.

 

2. Technical Writer

Technical companies may have amazing products and services, but if they can’t communicate their use to the public in an understandable way, they are unlikely to succeed. Enter technical writers.

These detail-oriented professionals typically have a combination of strong writing and critical thinking skills, along with a technical background which qualifies them to translate complex scientific or technical information in a coherent way. Technical writers work in a variety of industries with engineering and computer companies particularly in need of their services.

 

3. Accent Reduction Specialist

You may have never heard of accent reduction specialists before, but these professionals scored the top spot on a CNN roundup of “10 little-known fields with great job opportunities.”

So what do accent reduction specialists do? Simply put, they help people with strong accents and/or poor language skills learn to communicate better in order to break down barriers, change perception, and promote understanding. And while accent reduction specialists work with people with regional accents, their services are expected to be increasingly in demand with the globalization of the economy.

No formal certification is necessary to work in this field, but many accent reduction specialists begin their careers with an associate or bachelor’s degree in speech. Advanced studies in speech-language pathology, meanwhile, further qualify you to succeed as an accent reduction specialist.

 

4. Court Stenographer

Most people only think of lawyers and judges when they ponder legal careers, but the reality there are many different kinds of professionals working behind the scenes, including court stenographers. The most widely used form of recording court proceedings, stenography is the act of recording spoken words -- either through the use of a stenotype machine or shorthand.

In addition to working inside courtrooms, stenographers can also be found everywhere from corporate work to providing closed captioning services for the hard-of-hearing. Regardless of the setting, speed and accuracy are hallmarks of the best stenographers.

While many court stenographers are employed by legal entities, others work on a freelance basis. Your takeaway? If the thought of making your own schedule and working independently appeals to you, then you may have a bright future in this field -- which was listed by Business Insider as one of “16 Awesome Career Choices That Most College Kids Have Never Heard Of.”

 

5. Blacksmith

Also earning a spot on Business Insider’s list? Blacksmiths. Many people mistakenly assume that this craft -- which involves shaping iron and steel by forging them in fire --  is no longer practiced, but metalsmithing is very much alive and well today.

Blacksmithing involves far more than making horseshoes. It’s also a wonderful way to express your creativity. In fact, for people who enjoy design, working with their hands, and interacting with others, blacksmithing offers up a compelling counterpoint to an office job.

Wondering how to get started in blacksmithing? Programs like Fleming College’s Visual and Creative Arts Diploma (VCAD) offer exposure to foundational courses as well as studio-based learning and techniques in blacksmithing and other electives.

While conventional careers have plenty to offer, they can also be less-than-exciting, especially if you land on them by default. By researching as many potential career pathways as possible, you can ensure that you choose the one most likely to help you find fulfillment -- even if it comes from an unlikely or unexpected source.

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Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[db_lead] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[text] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and business person may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

 

1. Perfusionist

Never heard of this job before? Neither had we until we stumbled upon someone enthusing over it on Reddit. So what is a perfusionist? Also known as a cardiovascular perfusionist or clinical perfusionist, these specialized healthcare professionals are a critical part of any cardiothoracic team. Perfusionists are trained in operating heart-lung machines, which are used to temporarily replace both circulatory and respiratory function during cardiac surgery.

While this job can be stressful, it’s also incredibly fulfilling as perfusionists are directly involved in life-saving procedures. You can expect to be well-rewarded financially, as well: Experienced perfusionists can earn upwards of $100,000 a year.

You also can’t go wrong with this job in terms of security. As the population ages, the American Society for Extracorporeal Technology anticipates that demand will continue to rise for certified perfusionists.

 

2. Technical Writer

Technical companies may have amazing products and services, but if they can’t communicate their use to the public in an understandable way, they are unlikely to succeed. Enter technical writers.

These detail-oriented professionals typically have a combination of strong writing and critical thinking skills, along with a technical background which qualifies them to translate complex scientific or technical information in a coherent way. Technical writers work in a variety of industries with engineering and computer companies particularly in need of their services.

 

3. Accent Reduction Specialist

You may have never heard of accent reduction specialists before, but these professionals scored the top spot on a CNN roundup of “10 little-known fields with great job opportunities.”

So what do accent reduction specialists do? Simply put, they help people with strong accents and/or poor language skills learn to communicate better in order to break down barriers, change perception, and promote understanding. And while accent reduction specialists work with people with regional accents, their services are expected to be increasingly in demand with the globalization of the economy.

No formal certification is necessary to work in this field, but many accent reduction specialists begin their careers with an associate or bachelor’s degree in speech. Advanced studies in speech-language pathology, meanwhile, further qualify you to succeed as an accent reduction specialist.

 

4. Court Stenographer

Most people only think of lawyers and judges when they ponder legal careers, but the reality there are many different kinds of professionals working behind the scenes, including court stenographers. The most widely used form of recording court proceedings, stenography is the act of recording spoken words -- either through the use of a stenotype machine or shorthand.

In addition to working inside courtrooms, stenographers can also be found everywhere from corporate work to providing closed captioning services for the hard-of-hearing. Regardless of the setting, speed and accuracy are hallmarks of the best stenographers.

While many court stenographers are employed by legal entities, others work on a freelance basis. Your takeaway? If the thought of making your own schedule and working independently appeals to you, then you may have a bright future in this field -- which was listed by Business Insider as one of “16 Awesome Career Choices That Most College Kids Have Never Heard Of.”

 

5. Blacksmith

Also earning a spot on Business Insider’s list? Blacksmiths. Many people mistakenly assume that this craft -- which involves shaping iron and steel by forging them in fire --  is no longer practiced, but metalsmithing is very much alive and well today.

Blacksmithing involves far more than making horseshoes. It’s also a wonderful way to express your creativity. In fact, for people who enjoy design, working with their hands, and interacting with others, blacksmithing offers up a compelling counterpoint to an office job.

Wondering how to get started in blacksmithing? Programs like Fleming College’s Visual and Creative Arts Diploma (VCAD) offer exposure to foundational courses as well as studio-based learning and techniques in blacksmithing and other electives.

While conventional careers have plenty to offer, they can also be less-than-exciting, especially if you land on them by default. By researching as many potential career pathways as possible, you can ensure that you choose the one most likely to help you find fulfillment -- even if it comes from an unlikely or unexpected source.

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[db_lead] =>

Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[db_lead] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[text] =>

Probably not.  But it certainly can buy some peace of mind—especially when we’re talking about student debt.  A recent study from Purdue University suggests that while a certain income level may make you happy, you need to factor in debt to understand your overall happiness. 

Louis Tay, assistant professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University determined that “carrying student loan debt is almost as important as income in predicting financial worry and life satisfaction.”  Tay and his researchers, Cassondra Batz, Scott Parrigon, and Lauren Kuykendall, published the study in the Journal of Happiness Studies; they used an online college alumni sample of 2,781 people from the US.   Most students graduated in 2008, and have been carrying student debt for the past seven years.  Tay looked at relationships among average household income, student loan amount, life satisfaction, and sense of financial stress.  “We always think about how much income you can earn, but the reality is you can’t guarantee what you will earn post-college,” he said.  “There is a lot in the news about reducing, balancing, or managing college student debt, and this study shows the burden it can take on one’s life for the long term.”

Their findings?  The financial strain caused by student debt lowers your sense of well-being.  “A lot of people are pursuing a college education, which is a good thing,” said Tay.  “However, the financial cost of doing so also needs to be considered… There large loan numbers can sometimes be thrown around without us actually realizing [the] day-to-day impact on our lives.  We are now translating student loan debt to actual psychological and emotional burden.”

Your takeaway?  The key to your future happiness may lie in the amount of debt you already have—and are willing to take on.  Think carefully about your options and how you want your debt to influence your well-being.

Learn more about studying in the US

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Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[db_lead] =>

Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[text] =>

Probably not.  But it certainly can buy some peace of mind—especially when we’re talking about student debt.  A recent study from Purdue University suggests that while a certain income level may make you happy, you need to factor in debt to understand your overall happiness. 

Louis Tay, assistant professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University determined that “carrying student loan debt is almost as important as income in predicting financial worry and life satisfaction.”  Tay and his researchers, Cassondra Batz, Scott Parrigon, and Lauren Kuykendall, published the study in the Journal of Happiness Studies; they used an online college alumni sample of 2,781 people from the US.   Most students graduated in 2008, and have been carrying student debt for the past seven years.  Tay looked at relationships among average household income, student loan amount, life satisfaction, and sense of financial stress.  “We always think about how much income you can earn, but the reality is you can’t guarantee what you will earn post-college,” he said.  “There is a lot in the news about reducing, balancing, or managing college student debt, and this study shows the burden it can take on one’s life for the long term.”

Their findings?  The financial strain caused by student debt lowers your sense of well-being.  “A lot of people are pursuing a college education, which is a good thing,” said Tay.  “However, the financial cost of doing so also needs to be considered… There large loan numbers can sometimes be thrown around without us actually realizing [the] day-to-day impact on our lives.  We are now translating student loan debt to actual psychological and emotional burden.”

Your takeaway?  The key to your future happiness may lie in the amount of debt you already have—and are willing to take on.  Think carefully about your options and how you want your debt to influence your well-being.

Learn more about studying in the US

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Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[text] =>

From academic help to student life, and visas requirements to housing options, International Student Services offices around the world work hard to welcome and support international students from all walks of life.  Finding a university that matches your interests—and your needs—as an international student takes a bit of work.  We’ve put together a list of several factors for international students to consider when evaluating a prospective university.  Take a closer look. 

 

1. Numbers of Students

Generally speaking, if there are more international students on a campus, there are probably more resources.  At schools with big international populations, like Polk State College, or Centennial College, you can expect to find services for admissions counseling, social services, financial aid help, and mentoring programs.  One downside?  Make sure schools with larger international student populations have the services that match the numbers, otherwise you may experience a backlog and not get the help when you need it. 

Consider the benefits of schools with a small international student population, like Vilnius Business College in Lithuania or West Hills College in the US.  Just because a university, like the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, has a small international population doesn’t mean that there are no services.  It might just mean that the university has a smaller International Student Services office. Even small schools—some with as little as .5 percent of its population made up of international students—have services to help students with visas, travel, accommodations, the academic calendar, and familiarizing themselves with the community.  You might also get more personalized attention than you would at a larger school.

 

2. Mentoring Systems

Think about how a university welcomes its international students from the get-go. International students at top-rated Lund University in Sweden are greeted by student mentors and staff when they arrive at the airport.  Then they attend a fun social event where they meet other international students, and some of the faculty and staff in their programs.  Lund’s two-week orientation for all students combines special topics for international students on Swedish culture and food. Scotland’s University of Glasgow offers international students a similar welcome—and continued support with programs on Scotland’s history, and even workshops on budgeting and saving.

Why is this important?  You won’t succeed if you don’t feel welcomed by your new community.  Look for a school that works to welcome you and to continue to help you acclimate to your new school.

 

3. International Students Associations

Are there any on campus?  You’ll need more than just an International Student Services office—you’ll need the support of other international students. North Iowa Area Community College features an International Students and Friends Club for international and migrant students, as well as domestic students who want to get involved with the college’s international community. MIT is another example of a campus with a vibrant International Student Association.  In an effort to provide learning opportunities for all of its students, MIT allows domestic students to join the association also.  Their goal?  To promote cultural diversity on campus.  Not only to they offer delicious study breaks and fun trips, they also encourage students to get involved on their campus and the local community. 

 

4. Housing Help

You make “home” wherever you go in this world.  It’s nice to have help, especially when you’re not just new to the school, but new to the country, too.  Your International Student Office, like the ones at Western Iowa Tech Community College, College of Southern Idaho or Bifröst University in Iceland, should be able to direct you to on-campus options—and should also put you in touch with other students, faculty, and even local families who may have rooms or apartments for rent.  Think about what you want and how much money you want to spend.  If you want to save money, consider renting a room from a local family or a faculty member.  You can also contact your International Student Services office for help in finding a roommate. 

Studying abroad is one of the most exciting options you can consider as a student.   Bottom line?  Do your homework.  Research the schools where you might want to study.  Visit, if you can.  Talk to the staff at the International Student Services offices.  Get a feel for what you want—and focus on what you need. 

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Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[db_lead] =>

Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[text] =>

From academic help to student life, and visas requirements to housing options, International Student Services offices around the world work hard to welcome and support international students from all walks of life.  Finding a university that matches your interests—and your needs—as an international student takes a bit of work.  We’ve put together a list of several factors for international students to consider when evaluating a prospective university.  Take a closer look. 

 

1. Numbers of Students

Generally speaking, if there are more international students on a campus, there are probably more resources.  At schools with big international populations, like Polk State College, or Centennial College, you can expect to find services for admissions counseling, social services, financial aid help, and mentoring programs.  One downside?  Make sure schools with larger international student populations have the services that match the numbers, otherwise you may experience a backlog and not get the help when you need it. 

Consider the benefits of schools with a small international student population, like Vilnius Business College in Lithuania or West Hills College in the US.  Just because a university, like the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, has a small international population doesn’t mean that there are no services.  It might just mean that the university has a smaller International Student Services office. Even small schools—some with as little as .5 percent of its population made up of international students—have services to help students with visas, travel, accommodations, the academic calendar, and familiarizing themselves with the community.  You might also get more personalized attention than you would at a larger school.

 

2. Mentoring Systems

Think about how a university welcomes its international students from the get-go. International students at top-rated Lund University in Sweden are greeted by student mentors and staff when they arrive at the airport.  Then they attend a fun social event where they meet other international students, and some of the faculty and staff in their programs.  Lund’s two-week orientation for all students combines special topics for international students on Swedish culture and food. Scotland’s University of Glasgow offers international students a similar welcome—and continued support with programs on Scotland’s history, and even workshops on budgeting and saving.

Why is this important?  You won’t succeed if you don’t feel welcomed by your new community.  Look for a school that works to welcome you and to continue to help you acclimate to your new school.

 

3. International Students Associations

Are there any on campus?  You’ll need more than just an International Student Services office—you’ll need the support of other international students. North Iowa Area Community College features an International Students and Friends Club for international and migrant students, as well as domestic students who want to get involved with the college’s international community. MIT is another example of a campus with a vibrant International Student Association.  In an effort to provide learning opportunities for all of its students, MIT allows domestic students to join the association also.  Their goal?  To promote cultural diversity on campus.  Not only to they offer delicious study breaks and fun trips, they also encourage students to get involved on their campus and the local community. 

 

4. Housing Help

You make “home” wherever you go in this world.  It’s nice to have help, especially when you’re not just new to the school, but new to the country, too.  Your International Student Office, like the ones at Western Iowa Tech Community College, College of Southern Idaho or Bifröst University in Iceland, should be able to direct you to on-campus options—and should also put you in touch with other students, faculty, and even local families who may have rooms or apartments for rent.  Think about what you want and how much money you want to spend.  If you want to save money, consider renting a room from a local family or a faculty member.  You can also contact your International Student Services office for help in finding a roommate. 

Studying abroad is one of the most exciting options you can consider as a student.   Bottom line?  Do your homework.  Research the schools where you might want to study.  Visit, if you can.  Talk to the staff at the International Student Services offices.  Get a feel for what you want—and focus on what you need. 

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Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[text] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

About Learning Styles

According to an article published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the term learning style “refers to the fact that each person has a different way of accumulating knowledge.” This concept was first proposed in the 1970s, with a number of different models emerging to represent the way researchers believe human beings learn.

It’s important to note that while learning styles may indeed reflect individual preferences for how information is received, there’s no conclusive evidence indicating that identifying a person’s preferred learning style impacts outcomes. Still, many schools assess learning styles to help teachers and students alike better understand the process.

Understanding Learning Styles

Proposed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, the VARK model is one of the most commonly accepted classifications of learning styles. It comprises four modalities, including the following:

 

1. Visual (V)

Do you feel like you learn better through graphics? If so, you may be a visual learner. This mode includes the depiction of information via “maps, spider diagrams, charts, graphs, flow charts, labeled diagrams, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices, that people use to represent what could have been presented in words.”

Visual learning methods typically include patterns, shapes, designs and whitespace, but do not include pictures, photographs, videos, movies or even PowerPoint presentations. While words in boxes may be preferable for different types of learners, visual learners prefer that information be conveyed via diagrams, meaningful symbols, and other graphic formats.

For visual learners, seeking out courses which incorporate lots of visuals is a great start. Drawing visuals of problems; using graphing calculators; and developing your own visual aids, such as cognitive maps and charts, can further enrich your learning experience.

 

2. Aural/Auditory (A)

Do you feel like you take in information better when you hear it spoken aloud or say it out loud to yourself? If so, you may be an aural/auditory learner. According to VARK-Learn’s definition, individuals in this category learn best from “lectures, group discussion, radio, email, using mobile phones, speaking, web-chat and talking things through.”

Also included in this learning mode? Email -- because it is often conveyed and received “chat-style.” Aural/auditory learners also prefer sorting out their thoughts and questions aloud -- often repeating what they’ve heard aloud in their own words.

If you fall into the aural/auditory learning mode category, recommended study strategies include attending lectures; reading textbook information aloud; recording text materials as well as lectures; and choosing classes with opportunities for oral discussion.

 

3. Read/Write (R)

Are you all about words? Do you remember what you read better than what you hear? If so, you likely have a preference for the read/write learning modality. One of the most popular modes of learning for teachers and students, this category comprises “text-based input and output,” such as reading and writing assignments, essays, reports and manuals. Commonly relied on resources for read/write learners include dictionaries, quotations, the internet, PowerPoint, and lists.

Study strategies for students who prefer this learning style include reading textbooks; taking good notes; and choosing courses which focus on writing assignments.

 

4. Kinesthetic (K)

Do you learn best by doing? If so, your preference may be the increasingly prevalent kinesthetic model, which prioritizes the use of experience and practice over concepts and theory. According to VARK-Learn, “people who prefer this mode are connected to reality, either through concrete personal experiences, examples, practice or simulation.”  This active, tactile approach includes everything from demonstrations and simulations to videos and movies. Case studies, applications and practice (either real or simulated) are also preferred kinesthetic learning methods.

Kinesthetic learning can be particularly valuable to STEM students, according to edutopia, because it helps them breach mental barriers, accept different approaches to information, and ultimately assume a more “receptive state required for learning.”

Manipulative study strategies work well for kinesthetic learners, including writing, making visuals and models, using your fingers, and preparing index cards. Furthermore, incorporating movement while studying -- from chewing gum to tapping your pencil -- can help support focus and attention.

One last thing to keep in mind? Learning styles aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, research indicates that many students amalgamate a mix of learning styles. Even better? There’s no proof that a single learning style or combination of learning styles is more effective or less effective than another. Rather, it’s all about what works best for you.

 

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Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[db_lead] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[text] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

About Learning Styles

According to an article published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the term learning style “refers to the fact that each person has a different way of accumulating knowledge.” This concept was first proposed in the 1970s, with a number of different models emerging to represent the way researchers believe human beings learn.

It’s important to note that while learning styles may indeed reflect individual preferences for how information is received, there’s no conclusive evidence indicating that identifying a person’s preferred learning style impacts outcomes. Still, many schools assess learning styles to help teachers and students alike better understand the process.

Understanding Learning Styles

Proposed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, the VARK model is one of the most commonly accepted classifications of learning styles. It comprises four modalities, including the following:

 

1. Visual (V)

Do you feel like you learn better through graphics? If so, you may be a visual learner. This mode includes the depiction of information via “maps, spider diagrams, charts, graphs, flow charts, labeled diagrams, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices, that people use to represent what could have been presented in words.”

Visual learning methods typically include patterns, shapes, designs and whitespace, but do not include pictures, photographs, videos, movies or even PowerPoint presentations. While words in boxes may be preferable for different types of learners, visual learners prefer that information be conveyed via diagrams, meaningful symbols, and other graphic formats.

For visual learners, seeking out courses which incorporate lots of visuals is a great start. Drawing visuals of problems; using graphing calculators; and developing your own visual aids, such as cognitive maps and charts, can further enrich your learning experience.

 

2. Aural/Auditory (A)

Do you feel like you take in information better when you hear it spoken aloud or say it out loud to yourself? If so, you may be an aural/auditory learner. According to VARK-Learn’s definition, individuals in this category learn best from “lectures, group discussion, radio, email, using mobile phones, speaking, web-chat and talking things through.”

Also included in this learning mode? Email -- because it is often conveyed and received “chat-style.” Aural/auditory learners also prefer sorting out their thoughts and questions aloud -- often repeating what they’ve heard aloud in their own words.

If you fall into the aural/auditory learning mode category, recommended study strategies include attending lectures; reading textbook information aloud; recording text materials as well as lectures; and choosing classes with opportunities for oral discussion.

 

3. Read/Write (R)

Are you all about words? Do you remember what you read better than what you hear? If so, you likely have a preference for the read/write learning modality. One of the most popular modes of learning for teachers and students, this category comprises “text-based input and output,” such as reading and writing assignments, essays, reports and manuals. Commonly relied on resources for read/write learners include dictionaries, quotations, the internet, PowerPoint, and lists.

Study strategies for students who prefer this learning style include reading textbooks; taking good notes; and choosing courses which focus on writing assignments.

 

4. Kinesthetic (K)

Do you learn best by doing? If so, your preference may be the increasingly prevalent kinesthetic model, which prioritizes the use of experience and practice over concepts and theory. According to VARK-Learn, “people who prefer this mode are connected to reality, either through concrete personal experiences, examples, practice or simulation.”  This active, tactile approach includes everything from demonstrations and simulations to videos and movies. Case studies, applications and practice (either real or simulated) are also preferred kinesthetic learning methods.

Kinesthetic learning can be particularly valuable to STEM students, according to edutopia, because it helps them breach mental barriers, accept different approaches to information, and ultimately assume a more “receptive state required for learning.”

Manipulative study strategies work well for kinesthetic learners, including writing, making visuals and models, using your fingers, and preparing index cards. Furthermore, incorporating movement while studying -- from chewing gum to tapping your pencil -- can help support focus and attention.

One last thing to keep in mind? Learning styles aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, research indicates that many students amalgamate a mix of learning styles. Even better? There’s no proof that a single learning style or combination of learning styles is more effective or less effective than another. Rather, it’s all about what works best for you.

 

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Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[text] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and business person may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

 

1. Perfusionist

Never heard of this job before? Neither had we until we stumbled upon someone enthusing over it on Reddit. So what is a perfusionist? Also known as a cardiovascular perfusionist or clinical perfusionist, these specialized healthcare professionals are a critical part of any cardiothoracic team. Perfusionists are trained in operating heart-lung machines, which are used to temporarily replace both circulatory and respiratory function during cardiac surgery.

While this job can be stressful, it’s also incredibly fulfilling as perfusionists are directly involved in life-saving procedures. You can expect to be well-rewarded financially, as well: Experienced perfusionists can earn upwards of $100,000 a year.

You also can’t go wrong with this job in terms of security. As the population ages, the American Society for Extracorporeal Technology anticipates that demand will continue to rise for certified perfusionists.

 

2. Technical Writer

Technical companies may have amazing products and services, but if they can’t communicate their use to the public in an understandable way, they are unlikely to succeed. Enter technical writers.

These detail-oriented professionals typically have a combination of strong writing and critical thinking skills, along with a technical background which qualifies them to translate complex scientific or technical information in a coherent way. Technical writers work in a variety of industries with engineering and computer companies particularly in need of their services.

 

3. Accent Reduction Specialist

You may have never heard of accent reduction specialists before, but these professionals scored the top spot on a CNN roundup of “10 little-known fields with great job opportunities.”

So what do accent reduction specialists do? Simply put, they help people with strong accents and/or poor language skills learn to communicate better in order to break down barriers, change perception, and promote understanding. And while accent reduction specialists work with people with regional accents, their services are expected to be increasingly in demand with the globalization of the economy.

No formal certification is necessary to work in this field, but many accent reduction specialists begin their careers with an associate or bachelor’s degree in speech. Advanced studies in speech-language pathology, meanwhile, further qualify you to succeed as an accent reduction specialist.

 

4. Court Stenographer

Most people only think of lawyers and judges when they ponder legal careers, but the reality there are many different kinds of professionals working behind the scenes, including court stenographers. The most widely used form of recording court proceedings, stenography is the act of recording spoken words -- either through the use of a stenotype machine or shorthand.

In addition to working inside courtrooms, stenographers can also be found everywhere from corporate work to providing closed captioning services for the hard-of-hearing. Regardless of the setting, speed and accuracy are hallmarks of the best stenographers.

While many court stenographers are employed by legal entities, others work on a freelance basis. Your takeaway? If the thought of making your own schedule and working independently appeals to you, then you may have a bright future in this field -- which was listed by Business Insider as one of “16 Awesome Career Choices That Most College Kids Have Never Heard Of.”

 

5. Blacksmith

Also earning a spot on Business Insider’s list? Blacksmiths. Many people mistakenly assume that this craft -- which involves shaping iron and steel by forging them in fire --  is no longer practiced, but metalsmithing is very much alive and well today.

Blacksmithing involves far more than making horseshoes. It’s also a wonderful way to express your creativity. In fact, for people who enjoy design, working with their hands, and interacting with others, blacksmithing offers up a compelling counterpoint to an office job.

Wondering how to get started in blacksmithing? Programs like Fleming College’s Visual and Creative Arts Diploma (VCAD) offer exposure to foundational courses as well as studio-based learning and techniques in blacksmithing and other electives.

While conventional careers have plenty to offer, they can also be less-than-exciting, especially if you land on them by default. By researching as many potential career pathways as possible, you can ensure that you choose the one most likely to help you find fulfillment -- even if it comes from an unlikely or unexpected source.

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Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[db_lead] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[text] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and business person may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

 

1. Perfusionist

Never heard of this job before? Neither had we until we stumbled upon someone enthusing over it on Reddit. So what is a perfusionist? Also known as a cardiovascular perfusionist or clinical perfusionist, these specialized healthcare professionals are a critical part of any cardiothoracic team. Perfusionists are trained in operating heart-lung machines, which are used to temporarily replace both circulatory and respiratory function during cardiac surgery.

While this job can be stressful, it’s also incredibly fulfilling as perfusionists are directly involved in life-saving procedures. You can expect to be well-rewarded financially, as well: Experienced perfusionists can earn upwards of $100,000 a year.

You also can’t go wrong with this job in terms of security. As the population ages, the American Society for Extracorporeal Technology anticipates that demand will continue to rise for certified perfusionists.

 

2. Technical Writer

Technical companies may have amazing products and services, but if they can’t communicate their use to the public in an understandable way, they are unlikely to succeed. Enter technical writers.

These detail-oriented professionals typically have a combination of strong writing and critical thinking skills, along with a technical background which qualifies them to translate complex scientific or technical information in a coherent way. Technical writers work in a variety of industries with engineering and computer companies particularly in need of their services.

 

3. Accent Reduction Specialist

You may have never heard of accent reduction specialists before, but these professionals scored the top spot on a CNN roundup of “10 little-known fields with great job opportunities.”

So what do accent reduction specialists do? Simply put, they help people with strong accents and/or poor language skills learn to communicate better in order to break down barriers, change perception, and promote understanding. And while accent reduction specialists work with people with regional accents, their services are expected to be increasingly in demand with the globalization of the economy.

No formal certification is necessary to work in this field, but many accent reduction specialists begin their careers with an associate or bachelor’s degree in speech. Advanced studies in speech-language pathology, meanwhile, further qualify you to succeed as an accent reduction specialist.

 

4. Court Stenographer

Most people only think of lawyers and judges when they ponder legal careers, but the reality there are many different kinds of professionals working behind the scenes, including court stenographers. The most widely used form of recording court proceedings, stenography is the act of recording spoken words -- either through the use of a stenotype machine or shorthand.

In addition to working inside courtrooms, stenographers can also be found everywhere from corporate work to providing closed captioning services for the hard-of-hearing. Regardless of the setting, speed and accuracy are hallmarks of the best stenographers.

While many court stenographers are employed by legal entities, others work on a freelance basis. Your takeaway? If the thought of making your own schedule and working independently appeals to you, then you may have a bright future in this field -- which was listed by Business Insider as one of “16 Awesome Career Choices That Most College Kids Have Never Heard Of.”

 

5. Blacksmith

Also earning a spot on Business Insider’s list? Blacksmiths. Many people mistakenly assume that this craft -- which involves shaping iron and steel by forging them in fire --  is no longer practiced, but metalsmithing is very much alive and well today.

Blacksmithing involves far more than making horseshoes. It’s also a wonderful way to express your creativity. In fact, for people who enjoy design, working with their hands, and interacting with others, blacksmithing offers up a compelling counterpoint to an office job.

Wondering how to get started in blacksmithing? Programs like Fleming College’s Visual and Creative Arts Diploma (VCAD) offer exposure to foundational courses as well as studio-based learning and techniques in blacksmithing and other electives.

While conventional careers have plenty to offer, they can also be less-than-exciting, especially if you land on them by default. By researching as many potential career pathways as possible, you can ensure that you choose the one most likely to help you find fulfillment -- even if it comes from an unlikely or unexpected source.

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[db_lead] =>

Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[db_lead] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[text] =>

Probably not.  But it certainly can buy some peace of mind—especially when we’re talking about student debt.  A recent study from Purdue University suggests that while a certain income level may make you happy, you need to factor in debt to understand your overall happiness. 

Louis Tay, assistant professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University determined that “carrying student loan debt is almost as important as income in predicting financial worry and life satisfaction.”  Tay and his researchers, Cassondra Batz, Scott Parrigon, and Lauren Kuykendall, published the study in the Journal of Happiness Studies; they used an online college alumni sample of 2,781 people from the US.   Most students graduated in 2008, and have been carrying student debt for the past seven years.  Tay looked at relationships among average household income, student loan amount, life satisfaction, and sense of financial stress.  “We always think about how much income you can earn, but the reality is you can’t guarantee what you will earn post-college,” he said.  “There is a lot in the news about reducing, balancing, or managing college student debt, and this study shows the burden it can take on one’s life for the long term.”

Their findings?  The financial strain caused by student debt lowers your sense of well-being.  “A lot of people are pursuing a college education, which is a good thing,” said Tay.  “However, the financial cost of doing so also needs to be considered… There large loan numbers can sometimes be thrown around without us actually realizing [the] day-to-day impact on our lives.  We are now translating student loan debt to actual psychological and emotional burden.”

Your takeaway?  The key to your future happiness may lie in the amount of debt you already have—and are willing to take on.  Think carefully about your options and how you want your debt to influence your well-being.

Learn more about studying in the US

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Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[db_lead] =>

Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[text] =>

Probably not.  But it certainly can buy some peace of mind—especially when we’re talking about student debt.  A recent study from Purdue University suggests that while a certain income level may make you happy, you need to factor in debt to understand your overall happiness. 

Louis Tay, assistant professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University determined that “carrying student loan debt is almost as important as income in predicting financial worry and life satisfaction.”  Tay and his researchers, Cassondra Batz, Scott Parrigon, and Lauren Kuykendall, published the study in the Journal of Happiness Studies; they used an online college alumni sample of 2,781 people from the US.   Most students graduated in 2008, and have been carrying student debt for the past seven years.  Tay looked at relationships among average household income, student loan amount, life satisfaction, and sense of financial stress.  “We always think about how much income you can earn, but the reality is you can’t guarantee what you will earn post-college,” he said.  “There is a lot in the news about reducing, balancing, or managing college student debt, and this study shows the burden it can take on one’s life for the long term.”

Their findings?  The financial strain caused by student debt lowers your sense of well-being.  “A lot of people are pursuing a college education, which is a good thing,” said Tay.  “However, the financial cost of doing so also needs to be considered… There large loan numbers can sometimes be thrown around without us actually realizing [the] day-to-day impact on our lives.  We are now translating student loan debt to actual psychological and emotional burden.”

Your takeaway?  The key to your future happiness may lie in the amount of debt you already have—and are willing to take on.  Think carefully about your options and how you want your debt to influence your well-being.

Learn more about studying in the US

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Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[text] =>

From academic help to student life, and visas requirements to housing options, International Student Services offices around the world work hard to welcome and support international students from all walks of life.  Finding a university that matches your interests—and your needs—as an international student takes a bit of work.  We’ve put together a list of several factors for international students to consider when evaluating a prospective university.  Take a closer look. 

 

1. Numbers of Students

Generally speaking, if there are more international students on a campus, there are probably more resources.  At schools with big international populations, like Polk State College, or Centennial College, you can expect to find services for admissions counseling, social services, financial aid help, and mentoring programs.  One downside?  Make sure schools with larger international student populations have the services that match the numbers, otherwise you may experience a backlog and not get the help when you need it. 

Consider the benefits of schools with a small international student population, like Vilnius Business College in Lithuania or West Hills College in the US.  Just because a university, like the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, has a small international population doesn’t mean that there are no services.  It might just mean that the university has a smaller International Student Services office. Even small schools—some with as little as .5 percent of its population made up of international students—have services to help students with visas, travel, accommodations, the academic calendar, and familiarizing themselves with the community.  You might also get more personalized attention than you would at a larger school.

 

2. Mentoring Systems

Think about how a university welcomes its international students from the get-go. International students at top-rated Lund University in Sweden are greeted by student mentors and staff when they arrive at the airport.  Then they attend a fun social event where they meet other international students, and some of the faculty and staff in their programs.  Lund’s two-week orientation for all students combines special topics for international students on Swedish culture and food. Scotland’s University of Glasgow offers international students a similar welcome—and continued support with programs on Scotland’s history, and even workshops on budgeting and saving.

Why is this important?  You won’t succeed if you don’t feel welcomed by your new community.  Look for a school that works to welcome you and to continue to help you acclimate to your new school.

 

3. International Students Associations

Are there any on campus?  You’ll need more than just an International Student Services office—you’ll need the support of other international students. North Iowa Area Community College features an International Students and Friends Club for international and migrant students, as well as domestic students who want to get involved with the college’s international community. MIT is another example of a campus with a vibrant International Student Association.  In an effort to provide learning opportunities for all of its students, MIT allows domestic students to join the association also.  Their goal?  To promote cultural diversity on campus.  Not only to they offer delicious study breaks and fun trips, they also encourage students to get involved on their campus and the local community. 

 

4. Housing Help

You make “home” wherever you go in this world.  It’s nice to have help, especially when you’re not just new to the school, but new to the country, too.  Your International Student Office, like the ones at Western Iowa Tech Community College, College of Southern Idaho or Bifröst University in Iceland, should be able to direct you to on-campus options—and should also put you in touch with other students, faculty, and even local families who may have rooms or apartments for rent.  Think about what you want and how much money you want to spend.  If you want to save money, consider renting a room from a local family or a faculty member.  You can also contact your International Student Services office for help in finding a roommate. 

Studying abroad is one of the most exciting options you can consider as a student.   Bottom line?  Do your homework.  Research the schools where you might want to study.  Visit, if you can.  Talk to the staff at the International Student Services offices.  Get a feel for what you want—and focus on what you need. 

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Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[db_lead] =>

Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[text] =>

From academic help to student life, and visas requirements to housing options, International Student Services offices around the world work hard to welcome and support international students from all walks of life.  Finding a university that matches your interests—and your needs—as an international student takes a bit of work.  We’ve put together a list of several factors for international students to consider when evaluating a prospective university.  Take a closer look. 

 

1. Numbers of Students

Generally speaking, if there are more international students on a campus, there are probably more resources.  At schools with big international populations, like Polk State College, or Centennial College, you can expect to find services for admissions counseling, social services, financial aid help, and mentoring programs.  One downside?  Make sure schools with larger international student populations have the services that match the numbers, otherwise you may experience a backlog and not get the help when you need it. 

Consider the benefits of schools with a small international student population, like Vilnius Business College in Lithuania or West Hills College in the US.  Just because a university, like the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, has a small international population doesn’t mean that there are no services.  It might just mean that the university has a smaller International Student Services office. Even small schools—some with as little as .5 percent of its population made up of international students—have services to help students with visas, travel, accommodations, the academic calendar, and familiarizing themselves with the community.  You might also get more personalized attention than you would at a larger school.

 

2. Mentoring Systems

Think about how a university welcomes its international students from the get-go. International students at top-rated Lund University in Sweden are greeted by student mentors and staff when they arrive at the airport.  Then they attend a fun social event where they meet other international students, and some of the faculty and staff in their programs.  Lund’s two-week orientation for all students combines special topics for international students on Swedish culture and food. Scotland’s University of Glasgow offers international students a similar welcome—and continued support with programs on Scotland’s history, and even workshops on budgeting and saving.

Why is this important?  You won’t succeed if you don’t feel welcomed by your new community.  Look for a school that works to welcome you and to continue to help you acclimate to your new school.

 

3. International Students Associations

Are there any on campus?  You’ll need more than just an International Student Services office—you’ll need the support of other international students. North Iowa Area Community College features an International Students and Friends Club for international and migrant students, as well as domestic students who want to get involved with the college’s international community. MIT is another example of a campus with a vibrant International Student Association.  In an effort to provide learning opportunities for all of its students, MIT allows domestic students to join the association also.  Their goal?  To promote cultural diversity on campus.  Not only to they offer delicious study breaks and fun trips, they also encourage students to get involved on their campus and the local community. 

 

4. Housing Help

You make “home” wherever you go in this world.  It’s nice to have help, especially when you’re not just new to the school, but new to the country, too.  Your International Student Office, like the ones at Western Iowa Tech Community College, College of Southern Idaho or Bifröst University in Iceland, should be able to direct you to on-campus options—and should also put you in touch with other students, faculty, and even local families who may have rooms or apartments for rent.  Think about what you want and how much money you want to spend.  If you want to save money, consider renting a room from a local family or a faculty member.  You can also contact your International Student Services office for help in finding a roommate. 

Studying abroad is one of the most exciting options you can consider as a student.   Bottom line?  Do your homework.  Research the schools where you might want to study.  Visit, if you can.  Talk to the staff at the International Student Services offices.  Get a feel for what you want—and focus on what you need. 

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Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[text] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

About Learning Styles

According to an article published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the term learning style “refers to the fact that each person has a different way of accumulating knowledge.” This concept was first proposed in the 1970s, with a number of different models emerging to represent the way researchers believe human beings learn.

It’s important to note that while learning styles may indeed reflect individual preferences for how information is received, there’s no conclusive evidence indicating that identifying a person’s preferred learning style impacts outcomes. Still, many schools assess learning styles to help teachers and students alike better understand the process.

Understanding Learning Styles

Proposed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, the VARK model is one of the most commonly accepted classifications of learning styles. It comprises four modalities, including the following:

 

1. Visual (V)

Do you feel like you learn better through graphics? If so, you may be a visual learner. This mode includes the depiction of information via “maps, spider diagrams, charts, graphs, flow charts, labeled diagrams, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices, that people use to represent what could have been presented in words.”

Visual learning methods typically include patterns, shapes, designs and whitespace, but do not include pictures, photographs, videos, movies or even PowerPoint presentations. While words in boxes may be preferable for different types of learners, visual learners prefer that information be conveyed via diagrams, meaningful symbols, and other graphic formats.

For visual learners, seeking out courses which incorporate lots of visuals is a great start. Drawing visuals of problems; using graphing calculators; and developing your own visual aids, such as cognitive maps and charts, can further enrich your learning experience.

 

2. Aural/Auditory (A)

Do you feel like you take in information better when you hear it spoken aloud or say it out loud to yourself? If so, you may be an aural/auditory learner. According to VARK-Learn’s definition, individuals in this category learn best from “lectures, group discussion, radio, email, using mobile phones, speaking, web-chat and talking things through.”

Also included in this learning mode? Email -- because it is often conveyed and received “chat-style.” Aural/auditory learners also prefer sorting out their thoughts and questions aloud -- often repeating what they’ve heard aloud in their own words.

If you fall into the aural/auditory learning mode category, recommended study strategies include attending lectures; reading textbook information aloud; recording text materials as well as lectures; and choosing classes with opportunities for oral discussion.

 

3. Read/Write (R)

Are you all about words? Do you remember what you read better than what you hear? If so, you likely have a preference for the read/write learning modality. One of the most popular modes of learning for teachers and students, this category comprises “text-based input and output,” such as reading and writing assignments, essays, reports and manuals. Commonly relied on resources for read/write learners include dictionaries, quotations, the internet, PowerPoint, and lists.

Study strategies for students who prefer this learning style include reading textbooks; taking good notes; and choosing courses which focus on writing assignments.

 

4. Kinesthetic (K)

Do you learn best by doing? If so, your preference may be the increasingly prevalent kinesthetic model, which prioritizes the use of experience and practice over concepts and theory. According to VARK-Learn, “people who prefer this mode are connected to reality, either through concrete personal experiences, examples, practice or simulation.”  This active, tactile approach includes everything from demonstrations and simulations to videos and movies. Case studies, applications and practice (either real or simulated) are also preferred kinesthetic learning methods.

Kinesthetic learning can be particularly valuable to STEM students, according to edutopia, because it helps them breach mental barriers, accept different approaches to information, and ultimately assume a more “receptive state required for learning.”

Manipulative study strategies work well for kinesthetic learners, including writing, making visuals and models, using your fingers, and preparing index cards. Furthermore, incorporating movement while studying -- from chewing gum to tapping your pencil -- can help support focus and attention.

One last thing to keep in mind? Learning styles aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, research indicates that many students amalgamate a mix of learning styles. Even better? There’s no proof that a single learning style or combination of learning styles is more effective or less effective than another. Rather, it’s all about what works best for you.

 

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Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[db_lead] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[text] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

About Learning Styles

According to an article published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the term learning style “refers to the fact that each person has a different way of accumulating knowledge.” This concept was first proposed in the 1970s, with a number of different models emerging to represent the way researchers believe human beings learn.

It’s important to note that while learning styles may indeed reflect individual preferences for how information is received, there’s no conclusive evidence indicating that identifying a person’s preferred learning style impacts outcomes. Still, many schools assess learning styles to help teachers and students alike better understand the process.

Understanding Learning Styles

Proposed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, the VARK model is one of the most commonly accepted classifications of learning styles. It comprises four modalities, including the following:

 

1. Visual (V)

Do you feel like you learn better through graphics? If so, you may be a visual learner. This mode includes the depiction of information via “maps, spider diagrams, charts, graphs, flow charts, labeled diagrams, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices, that people use to represent what could have been presented in words.”

Visual learning methods typically include patterns, shapes, designs and whitespace, but do not include pictures, photographs, videos, movies or even PowerPoint presentations. While words in boxes may be preferable for different types of learners, visual learners prefer that information be conveyed via diagrams, meaningful symbols, and other graphic formats.

For visual learners, seeking out courses which incorporate lots of visuals is a great start. Drawing visuals of problems; using graphing calculators; and developing your own visual aids, such as cognitive maps and charts, can further enrich your learning experience.

 

2. Aural/Auditory (A)

Do you feel like you take in information better when you hear it spoken aloud or say it out loud to yourself? If so, you may be an aural/auditory learner. According to VARK-Learn’s definition, individuals in this category learn best from “lectures, group discussion, radio, email, using mobile phones, speaking, web-chat and talking things through.”

Also included in this learning mode? Email -- because it is often conveyed and received “chat-style.” Aural/auditory learners also prefer sorting out their thoughts and questions aloud -- often repeating what they’ve heard aloud in their own words.

If you fall into the aural/auditory learning mode category, recommended study strategies include attending lectures; reading textbook information aloud; recording text materials as well as lectures; and choosing classes with opportunities for oral discussion.

 

3. Read/Write (R)

Are you all about words? Do you remember what you read better than what you hear? If so, you likely have a preference for the read/write learning modality. One of the most popular modes of learning for teachers and students, this category comprises “text-based input and output,” such as reading and writing assignments, essays, reports and manuals. Commonly relied on resources for read/write learners include dictionaries, quotations, the internet, PowerPoint, and lists.

Study strategies for students who prefer this learning style include reading textbooks; taking good notes; and choosing courses which focus on writing assignments.

 

4. Kinesthetic (K)

Do you learn best by doing? If so, your preference may be the increasingly prevalent kinesthetic model, which prioritizes the use of experience and practice over concepts and theory. According to VARK-Learn, “people who prefer this mode are connected to reality, either through concrete personal experiences, examples, practice or simulation.”  This active, tactile approach includes everything from demonstrations and simulations to videos and movies. Case studies, applications and practice (either real or simulated) are also preferred kinesthetic learning methods.

Kinesthetic learning can be particularly valuable to STEM students, according to edutopia, because it helps them breach mental barriers, accept different approaches to information, and ultimately assume a more “receptive state required for learning.”

Manipulative study strategies work well for kinesthetic learners, including writing, making visuals and models, using your fingers, and preparing index cards. Furthermore, incorporating movement while studying -- from chewing gum to tapping your pencil -- can help support focus and attention.

One last thing to keep in mind? Learning styles aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, research indicates that many students amalgamate a mix of learning styles. Even better? There’s no proof that a single learning style or combination of learning styles is more effective or less effective than another. Rather, it’s all about what works best for you.

 

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Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[text] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and business person may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

 

1. Perfusionist

Never heard of this job before? Neither had we until we stumbled upon someone enthusing over it on Reddit. So what is a perfusionist? Also known as a cardiovascular perfusionist or clinical perfusionist, these specialized healthcare professionals are a critical part of any cardiothoracic team. Perfusionists are trained in operating heart-lung machines, which are used to temporarily replace both circulatory and respiratory function during cardiac surgery.

While this job can be stressful, it’s also incredibly fulfilling as perfusionists are directly involved in life-saving procedures. You can expect to be well-rewarded financially, as well: Experienced perfusionists can earn upwards of $100,000 a year.

You also can’t go wrong with this job in terms of security. As the population ages, the American Society for Extracorporeal Technology anticipates that demand will continue to rise for certified perfusionists.

 

2. Technical Writer

Technical companies may have amazing products and services, but if they can’t communicate their use to the public in an understandable way, they are unlikely to succeed. Enter technical writers.

These detail-oriented professionals typically have a combination of strong writing and critical thinking skills, along with a technical background which qualifies them to translate complex scientific or technical information in a coherent way. Technical writers work in a variety of industries with engineering and computer companies particularly in need of their services.

 

3. Accent Reduction Specialist

You may have never heard of accent reduction specialists before, but these professionals scored the top spot on a CNN roundup of “10 little-known fields with great job opportunities.”

So what do accent reduction specialists do? Simply put, they help people with strong accents and/or poor language skills learn to communicate better in order to break down barriers, change perception, and promote understanding. And while accent reduction specialists work with people with regional accents, their services are expected to be increasingly in demand with the globalization of the economy.

No formal certification is necessary to work in this field, but many accent reduction specialists begin their careers with an associate or bachelor’s degree in speech. Advanced studies in speech-language pathology, meanwhile, further qualify you to succeed as an accent reduction specialist.

 

4. Court Stenographer

Most people only think of lawyers and judges when they ponder legal careers, but the reality there are many different kinds of professionals working behind the scenes, including court stenographers. The most widely used form of recording court proceedings, stenography is the act of recording spoken words -- either through the use of a stenotype machine or shorthand.

In addition to working inside courtrooms, stenographers can also be found everywhere from corporate work to providing closed captioning services for the hard-of-hearing. Regardless of the setting, speed and accuracy are hallmarks of the best stenographers.

While many court stenographers are employed by legal entities, others work on a freelance basis. Your takeaway? If the thought of making your own schedule and working independently appeals to you, then you may have a bright future in this field -- which was listed by Business Insider as one of “16 Awesome Career Choices That Most College Kids Have Never Heard Of.”

 

5. Blacksmith

Also earning a spot on Business Insider’s list? Blacksmiths. Many people mistakenly assume that this craft -- which involves shaping iron and steel by forging them in fire --  is no longer practiced, but metalsmithing is very much alive and well today.

Blacksmithing involves far more than making horseshoes. It’s also a wonderful way to express your creativity. In fact, for people who enjoy design, working with their hands, and interacting with others, blacksmithing offers up a compelling counterpoint to an office job.

Wondering how to get started in blacksmithing? Programs like Fleming College’s Visual and Creative Arts Diploma (VCAD) offer exposure to foundational courses as well as studio-based learning and techniques in blacksmithing and other electives.

While conventional careers have plenty to offer, they can also be less-than-exciting, especially if you land on them by default. By researching as many potential career pathways as possible, you can ensure that you choose the one most likely to help you find fulfillment -- even if it comes from an unlikely or unexpected source.

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Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[db_lead] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[text] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and business person may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

 

1. Perfusionist

Never heard of this job before? Neither had we until we stumbled upon someone enthusing over it on Reddit. So what is a perfusionist? Also known as a cardiovascular perfusionist or clinical perfusionist, these specialized healthcare professionals are a critical part of any cardiothoracic team. Perfusionists are trained in operating heart-lung machines, which are used to temporarily replace both circulatory and respiratory function during cardiac surgery.

While this job can be stressful, it’s also incredibly fulfilling as perfusionists are directly involved in life-saving procedures. You can expect to be well-rewarded financially, as well: Experienced perfusionists can earn upwards of $100,000 a year.

You also can’t go wrong with this job in terms of security. As the population ages, the American Society for Extracorporeal Technology anticipates that demand will continue to rise for certified perfusionists.

 

2. Technical Writer

Technical companies may have amazing products and services, but if they can’t communicate their use to the public in an understandable way, they are unlikely to succeed. Enter technical writers.

These detail-oriented professionals typically have a combination of strong writing and critical thinking skills, along with a technical background which qualifies them to translate complex scientific or technical information in a coherent way. Technical writers work in a variety of industries with engineering and computer companies particularly in need of their services.

 

3. Accent Reduction Specialist

You may have never heard of accent reduction specialists before, but these professionals scored the top spot on a CNN roundup of “10 little-known fields with great job opportunities.”

So what do accent reduction specialists do? Simply put, they help people with strong accents and/or poor language skills learn to communicate better in order to break down barriers, change perception, and promote understanding. And while accent reduction specialists work with people with regional accents, their services are expected to be increasingly in demand with the globalization of the economy.

No formal certification is necessary to work in this field, but many accent reduction specialists begin their careers with an associate or bachelor’s degree in speech. Advanced studies in speech-language pathology, meanwhile, further qualify you to succeed as an accent reduction specialist.

 

4. Court Stenographer

Most people only think of lawyers and judges when they ponder legal careers, but the reality there are many different kinds of professionals working behind the scenes, including court stenographers. The most widely used form of recording court proceedings, stenography is the act of recording spoken words -- either through the use of a stenotype machine or shorthand.

In addition to working inside courtrooms, stenographers can also be found everywhere from corporate work to providing closed captioning services for the hard-of-hearing. Regardless of the setting, speed and accuracy are hallmarks of the best stenographers.

While many court stenographers are employed by legal entities, others work on a freelance basis. Your takeaway? If the thought of making your own schedule and working independently appeals to you, then you may have a bright future in this field -- which was listed by Business Insider as one of “16 Awesome Career Choices That Most College Kids Have Never Heard Of.”

 

5. Blacksmith

Also earning a spot on Business Insider’s list? Blacksmiths. Many people mistakenly assume that this craft -- which involves shaping iron and steel by forging them in fire --  is no longer practiced, but metalsmithing is very much alive and well today.

Blacksmithing involves far more than making horseshoes. It’s also a wonderful way to express your creativity. In fact, for people who enjoy design, working with their hands, and interacting with others, blacksmithing offers up a compelling counterpoint to an office job.

Wondering how to get started in blacksmithing? Programs like Fleming College’s Visual and Creative Arts Diploma (VCAD) offer exposure to foundational courses as well as studio-based learning and techniques in blacksmithing and other electives.

While conventional careers have plenty to offer, they can also be less-than-exciting, especially if you land on them by default. By researching as many potential career pathways as possible, you can ensure that you choose the one most likely to help you find fulfillment -- even if it comes from an unlikely or unexpected source.

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[db_lead] =>

Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[db_lead] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[text] =>

Probably not.  But it certainly can buy some peace of mind—especially when we’re talking about student debt.  A recent study from Purdue University suggests that while a certain income level may make you happy, you need to factor in debt to understand your overall happiness. 

Louis Tay, assistant professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University determined that “carrying student loan debt is almost as important as income in predicting financial worry and life satisfaction.”  Tay and his researchers, Cassondra Batz, Scott Parrigon, and Lauren Kuykendall, published the study in the Journal of Happiness Studies; they used an online college alumni sample of 2,781 people from the US.   Most students graduated in 2008, and have been carrying student debt for the past seven years.  Tay looked at relationships among average household income, student loan amount, life satisfaction, and sense of financial stress.  “We always think about how much income you can earn, but the reality is you can’t guarantee what you will earn post-college,” he said.  “There is a lot in the news about reducing, balancing, or managing college student debt, and this study shows the burden it can take on one’s life for the long term.”

Their findings?  The financial strain caused by student debt lowers your sense of well-being.  “A lot of people are pursuing a college education, which is a good thing,” said Tay.  “However, the financial cost of doing so also needs to be considered… There large loan numbers can sometimes be thrown around without us actually realizing [the] day-to-day impact on our lives.  We are now translating student loan debt to actual psychological and emotional burden.”

Your takeaway?  The key to your future happiness may lie in the amount of debt you already have—and are willing to take on.  Think carefully about your options and how you want your debt to influence your well-being.

Learn more about studying in the US

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Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[db_lead] =>

Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[text] =>

Probably not.  But it certainly can buy some peace of mind—especially when we’re talking about student debt.  A recent study from Purdue University suggests that while a certain income level may make you happy, you need to factor in debt to understand your overall happiness. 

Louis Tay, assistant professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University determined that “carrying student loan debt is almost as important as income in predicting financial worry and life satisfaction.”  Tay and his researchers, Cassondra Batz, Scott Parrigon, and Lauren Kuykendall, published the study in the Journal of Happiness Studies; they used an online college alumni sample of 2,781 people from the US.   Most students graduated in 2008, and have been carrying student debt for the past seven years.  Tay looked at relationships among average household income, student loan amount, life satisfaction, and sense of financial stress.  “We always think about how much income you can earn, but the reality is you can’t guarantee what you will earn post-college,” he said.  “There is a lot in the news about reducing, balancing, or managing college student debt, and this study shows the burden it can take on one’s life for the long term.”

Their findings?  The financial strain caused by student debt lowers your sense of well-being.  “A lot of people are pursuing a college education, which is a good thing,” said Tay.  “However, the financial cost of doing so also needs to be considered… There large loan numbers can sometimes be thrown around without us actually realizing [the] day-to-day impact on our lives.  We are now translating student loan debt to actual psychological and emotional burden.”

Your takeaway?  The key to your future happiness may lie in the amount of debt you already have—and are willing to take on.  Think carefully about your options and how you want your debt to influence your well-being.

Learn more about studying in the US

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Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[text] =>

From academic help to student life, and visas requirements to housing options, International Student Services offices around the world work hard to welcome and support international students from all walks of life.  Finding a university that matches your interests—and your needs—as an international student takes a bit of work.  We’ve put together a list of several factors for international students to consider when evaluating a prospective university.  Take a closer look. 

 

1. Numbers of Students

Generally speaking, if there are more international students on a campus, there are probably more resources.  At schools with big international populations, like Polk State College, or Centennial College, you can expect to find services for admissions counseling, social services, financial aid help, and mentoring programs.  One downside?  Make sure schools with larger international student populations have the services that match the numbers, otherwise you may experience a backlog and not get the help when you need it. 

Consider the benefits of schools with a small international student population, like Vilnius Business College in Lithuania or West Hills College in the US.  Just because a university, like the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, has a small international population doesn’t mean that there are no services.  It might just mean that the university has a smaller International Student Services office. Even small schools—some with as little as .5 percent of its population made up of international students—have services to help students with visas, travel, accommodations, the academic calendar, and familiarizing themselves with the community.  You might also get more personalized attention than you would at a larger school.

 

2. Mentoring Systems

Think about how a university welcomes its international students from the get-go. International students at top-rated Lund University in Sweden are greeted by student mentors and staff when they arrive at the airport.  Then they attend a fun social event where they meet other international students, and some of the faculty and staff in their programs.  Lund’s two-week orientation for all students combines special topics for international students on Swedish culture and food. Scotland’s University of Glasgow offers international students a similar welcome—and continued support with programs on Scotland’s history, and even workshops on budgeting and saving.

Why is this important?  You won’t succeed if you don’t feel welcomed by your new community.  Look for a school that works to welcome you and to continue to help you acclimate to your new school.

 

3. International Students Associations

Are there any on campus?  You’ll need more than just an International Student Services office—you’ll need the support of other international students. North Iowa Area Community College features an International Students and Friends Club for international and migrant students, as well as domestic students who want to get involved with the college’s international community. MIT is another example of a campus with a vibrant International Student Association.  In an effort to provide learning opportunities for all of its students, MIT allows domestic students to join the association also.  Their goal?  To promote cultural diversity on campus.  Not only to they offer delicious study breaks and fun trips, they also encourage students to get involved on their campus and the local community. 

 

4. Housing Help

You make “home” wherever you go in this world.  It’s nice to have help, especially when you’re not just new to the school, but new to the country, too.  Your International Student Office, like the ones at Western Iowa Tech Community College, College of Southern Idaho or Bifröst University in Iceland, should be able to direct you to on-campus options—and should also put you in touch with other students, faculty, and even local families who may have rooms or apartments for rent.  Think about what you want and how much money you want to spend.  If you want to save money, consider renting a room from a local family or a faculty member.  You can also contact your International Student Services office for help in finding a roommate. 

Studying abroad is one of the most exciting options you can consider as a student.   Bottom line?  Do your homework.  Research the schools where you might want to study.  Visit, if you can.  Talk to the staff at the International Student Services offices.  Get a feel for what you want—and focus on what you need. 

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Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[db_lead] =>

Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[text] =>

From academic help to student life, and visas requirements to housing options, International Student Services offices around the world work hard to welcome and support international students from all walks of life.  Finding a university that matches your interests—and your needs—as an international student takes a bit of work.  We’ve put together a list of several factors for international students to consider when evaluating a prospective university.  Take a closer look. 

 

1. Numbers of Students

Generally speaking, if there are more international students on a campus, there are probably more resources.  At schools with big international populations, like Polk State College, or Centennial College, you can expect to find services for admissions counseling, social services, financial aid help, and mentoring programs.  One downside?  Make sure schools with larger international student populations have the services that match the numbers, otherwise you may experience a backlog and not get the help when you need it. 

Consider the benefits of schools with a small international student population, like Vilnius Business College in Lithuania or West Hills College in the US.  Just because a university, like the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, has a small international population doesn’t mean that there are no services.  It might just mean that the university has a smaller International Student Services office. Even small schools—some with as little as .5 percent of its population made up of international students—have services to help students with visas, travel, accommodations, the academic calendar, and familiarizing themselves with the community.  You might also get more personalized attention than you would at a larger school.

 

2. Mentoring Systems

Think about how a university welcomes its international students from the get-go. International students at top-rated Lund University in Sweden are greeted by student mentors and staff when they arrive at the airport.  Then they attend a fun social event where they meet other international students, and some of the faculty and staff in their programs.  Lund’s two-week orientation for all students combines special topics for international students on Swedish culture and food. Scotland’s University of Glasgow offers international students a similar welcome—and continued support with programs on Scotland’s history, and even workshops on budgeting and saving.

Why is this important?  You won’t succeed if you don’t feel welcomed by your new community.  Look for a school that works to welcome you and to continue to help you acclimate to your new school.

 

3. International Students Associations

Are there any on campus?  You’ll need more than just an International Student Services office—you’ll need the support of other international students. North Iowa Area Community College features an International Students and Friends Club for international and migrant students, as well as domestic students who want to get involved with the college’s international community. MIT is another example of a campus with a vibrant International Student Association.  In an effort to provide learning opportunities for all of its students, MIT allows domestic students to join the association also.  Their goal?  To promote cultural diversity on campus.  Not only to they offer delicious study breaks and fun trips, they also encourage students to get involved on their campus and the local community. 

 

4. Housing Help

You make “home” wherever you go in this world.  It’s nice to have help, especially when you’re not just new to the school, but new to the country, too.  Your International Student Office, like the ones at Western Iowa Tech Community College, College of Southern Idaho or Bifröst University in Iceland, should be able to direct you to on-campus options—and should also put you in touch with other students, faculty, and even local families who may have rooms or apartments for rent.  Think about what you want and how much money you want to spend.  If you want to save money, consider renting a room from a local family or a faculty member.  You can also contact your International Student Services office for help in finding a roommate. 

Studying abroad is one of the most exciting options you can consider as a student.   Bottom line?  Do your homework.  Research the schools where you might want to study.  Visit, if you can.  Talk to the staff at the International Student Services offices.  Get a feel for what you want—and focus on what you need. 

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Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[text] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

About Learning Styles

According to an article published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the term learning style “refers to the fact that each person has a different way of accumulating knowledge.” This concept was first proposed in the 1970s, with a number of different models emerging to represent the way researchers believe human beings learn.

It’s important to note that while learning styles may indeed reflect individual preferences for how information is received, there’s no conclusive evidence indicating that identifying a person’s preferred learning style impacts outcomes. Still, many schools assess learning styles to help teachers and students alike better understand the process.

Understanding Learning Styles

Proposed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, the VARK model is one of the most commonly accepted classifications of learning styles. It comprises four modalities, including the following:

 

1. Visual (V)

Do you feel like you learn better through graphics? If so, you may be a visual learner. This mode includes the depiction of information via “maps, spider diagrams, charts, graphs, flow charts, labeled diagrams, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices, that people use to represent what could have been presented in words.”

Visual learning methods typically include patterns, shapes, designs and whitespace, but do not include pictures, photographs, videos, movies or even PowerPoint presentations. While words in boxes may be preferable for different types of learners, visual learners prefer that information be conveyed via diagrams, meaningful symbols, and other graphic formats.

For visual learners, seeking out courses which incorporate lots of visuals is a great start. Drawing visuals of problems; using graphing calculators; and developing your own visual aids, such as cognitive maps and charts, can further enrich your learning experience.

 

2. Aural/Auditory (A)

Do you feel like you take in information better when you hear it spoken aloud or say it out loud to yourself? If so, you may be an aural/auditory learner. According to VARK-Learn’s definition, individuals in this category learn best from “lectures, group discussion, radio, email, using mobile phones, speaking, web-chat and talking things through.”

Also included in this learning mode? Email -- because it is often conveyed and received “chat-style.” Aural/auditory learners also prefer sorting out their thoughts and questions aloud -- often repeating what they’ve heard aloud in their own words.

If you fall into the aural/auditory learning mode category, recommended study strategies include attending lectures; reading textbook information aloud; recording text materials as well as lectures; and choosing classes with opportunities for oral discussion.

 

3. Read/Write (R)

Are you all about words? Do you remember what you read better than what you hear? If so, you likely have a preference for the read/write learning modality. One of the most popular modes of learning for teachers and students, this category comprises “text-based input and output,” such as reading and writing assignments, essays, reports and manuals. Commonly relied on resources for read/write learners include dictionaries, quotations, the internet, PowerPoint, and lists.

Study strategies for students who prefer this learning style include reading textbooks; taking good notes; and choosing courses which focus on writing assignments.

 

4. Kinesthetic (K)

Do you learn best by doing? If so, your preference may be the increasingly prevalent kinesthetic model, which prioritizes the use of experience and practice over concepts and theory. According to VARK-Learn, “people who prefer this mode are connected to reality, either through concrete personal experiences, examples, practice or simulation.”  This active, tactile approach includes everything from demonstrations and simulations to videos and movies. Case studies, applications and practice (either real or simulated) are also preferred kinesthetic learning methods.

Kinesthetic learning can be particularly valuable to STEM students, according to edutopia, because it helps them breach mental barriers, accept different approaches to information, and ultimately assume a more “receptive state required for learning.”

Manipulative study strategies work well for kinesthetic learners, including writing, making visuals and models, using your fingers, and preparing index cards. Furthermore, incorporating movement while studying -- from chewing gum to tapping your pencil -- can help support focus and attention.

One last thing to keep in mind? Learning styles aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, research indicates that many students amalgamate a mix of learning styles. Even better? There’s no proof that a single learning style or combination of learning styles is more effective or less effective than another. Rather, it’s all about what works best for you.

 

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Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[db_lead] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[text] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

About Learning Styles

According to an article published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the term learning style “refers to the fact that each person has a different way of accumulating knowledge.” This concept was first proposed in the 1970s, with a number of different models emerging to represent the way researchers believe human beings learn.

It’s important to note that while learning styles may indeed reflect individual preferences for how information is received, there’s no conclusive evidence indicating that identifying a person’s preferred learning style impacts outcomes. Still, many schools assess learning styles to help teachers and students alike better understand the process.

Understanding Learning Styles

Proposed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, the VARK model is one of the most commonly accepted classifications of learning styles. It comprises four modalities, including the following:

 

1. Visual (V)

Do you feel like you learn better through graphics? If so, you may be a visual learner. This mode includes the depiction of information via “maps, spider diagrams, charts, graphs, flow charts, labeled diagrams, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices, that people use to represent what could have been presented in words.”

Visual learning methods typically include patterns, shapes, designs and whitespace, but do not include pictures, photographs, videos, movies or even PowerPoint presentations. While words in boxes may be preferable for different types of learners, visual learners prefer that information be conveyed via diagrams, meaningful symbols, and other graphic formats.

For visual learners, seeking out courses which incorporate lots of visuals is a great start. Drawing visuals of problems; using graphing calculators; and developing your own visual aids, such as cognitive maps and charts, can further enrich your learning experience.

 

2. Aural/Auditory (A)

Do you feel like you take in information better when you hear it spoken aloud or say it out loud to yourself? If so, you may be an aural/auditory learner. According to VARK-Learn’s definition, individuals in this category learn best from “lectures, group discussion, radio, email, using mobile phones, speaking, web-chat and talking things through.”

Also included in this learning mode? Email -- because it is often conveyed and received “chat-style.” Aural/auditory learners also prefer sorting out their thoughts and questions aloud -- often repeating what they’ve heard aloud in their own words.

If you fall into the aural/auditory learning mode category, recommended study strategies include attending lectures; reading textbook information aloud; recording text materials as well as lectures; and choosing classes with opportunities for oral discussion.

 

3. Read/Write (R)

Are you all about words? Do you remember what you read better than what you hear? If so, you likely have a preference for the read/write learning modality. One of the most popular modes of learning for teachers and students, this category comprises “text-based input and output,” such as reading and writing assignments, essays, reports and manuals. Commonly relied on resources for read/write learners include dictionaries, quotations, the internet, PowerPoint, and lists.

Study strategies for students who prefer this learning style include reading textbooks; taking good notes; and choosing courses which focus on writing assignments.

 

4. Kinesthetic (K)

Do you learn best by doing? If so, your preference may be the increasingly prevalent kinesthetic model, which prioritizes the use of experience and practice over concepts and theory. According to VARK-Learn, “people who prefer this mode are connected to reality, either through concrete personal experiences, examples, practice or simulation.”  This active, tactile approach includes everything from demonstrations and simulations to videos and movies. Case studies, applications and practice (either real or simulated) are also preferred kinesthetic learning methods.

Kinesthetic learning can be particularly valuable to STEM students, according to edutopia, because it helps them breach mental barriers, accept different approaches to information, and ultimately assume a more “receptive state required for learning.”

Manipulative study strategies work well for kinesthetic learners, including writing, making visuals and models, using your fingers, and preparing index cards. Furthermore, incorporating movement while studying -- from chewing gum to tapping your pencil -- can help support focus and attention.

One last thing to keep in mind? Learning styles aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, research indicates that many students amalgamate a mix of learning styles. Even better? There’s no proof that a single learning style or combination of learning styles is more effective or less effective than another. Rather, it’s all about what works best for you.

 

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Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[text] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and business person may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

 

1. Perfusionist

Never heard of this job before? Neither had we until we stumbled upon someone enthusing over it on Reddit. So what is a perfusionist? Also known as a cardiovascular perfusionist or clinical perfusionist, these specialized healthcare professionals are a critical part of any cardiothoracic team. Perfusionists are trained in operating heart-lung machines, which are used to temporarily replace both circulatory and respiratory function during cardiac surgery.

While this job can be stressful, it’s also incredibly fulfilling as perfusionists are directly involved in life-saving procedures. You can expect to be well-rewarded financially, as well: Experienced perfusionists can earn upwards of $100,000 a year.

You also can’t go wrong with this job in terms of security. As the population ages, the American Society for Extracorporeal Technology anticipates that demand will continue to rise for certified perfusionists.

 

2. Technical Writer

Technical companies may have amazing products and services, but if they can’t communicate their use to the public in an understandable way, they are unlikely to succeed. Enter technical writers.

These detail-oriented professionals typically have a combination of strong writing and critical thinking skills, along with a technical background which qualifies them to translate complex scientific or technical information in a coherent way. Technical writers work in a variety of industries with engineering and computer companies particularly in need of their services.

 

3. Accent Reduction Specialist

You may have never heard of accent reduction specialists before, but these professionals scored the top spot on a CNN roundup of “10 little-known fields with great job opportunities.”

So what do accent reduction specialists do? Simply put, they help people with strong accents and/or poor language skills learn to communicate better in order to break down barriers, change perception, and promote understanding. And while accent reduction specialists work with people with regional accents, their services are expected to be increasingly in demand with the globalization of the economy.

No formal certification is necessary to work in this field, but many accent reduction specialists begin their careers with an associate or bachelor’s degree in speech. Advanced studies in speech-language pathology, meanwhile, further qualify you to succeed as an accent reduction specialist.

 

4. Court Stenographer

Most people only think of lawyers and judges when they ponder legal careers, but the reality there are many different kinds of professionals working behind the scenes, including court stenographers. The most widely used form of recording court proceedings, stenography is the act of recording spoken words -- either through the use of a stenotype machine or shorthand.

In addition to working inside courtrooms, stenographers can also be found everywhere from corporate work to providing closed captioning services for the hard-of-hearing. Regardless of the setting, speed and accuracy are hallmarks of the best stenographers.

While many court stenographers are employed by legal entities, others work on a freelance basis. Your takeaway? If the thought of making your own schedule and working independently appeals to you, then you may have a bright future in this field -- which was listed by Business Insider as one of “16 Awesome Career Choices That Most College Kids Have Never Heard Of.”

 

5. Blacksmith

Also earning a spot on Business Insider’s list? Blacksmiths. Many people mistakenly assume that this craft -- which involves shaping iron and steel by forging them in fire --  is no longer practiced, but metalsmithing is very much alive and well today.

Blacksmithing involves far more than making horseshoes. It’s also a wonderful way to express your creativity. In fact, for people who enjoy design, working with their hands, and interacting with others, blacksmithing offers up a compelling counterpoint to an office job.

Wondering how to get started in blacksmithing? Programs like Fleming College’s Visual and Creative Arts Diploma (VCAD) offer exposure to foundational courses as well as studio-based learning and techniques in blacksmithing and other electives.

While conventional careers have plenty to offer, they can also be less-than-exciting, especially if you land on them by default. By researching as many potential career pathways as possible, you can ensure that you choose the one most likely to help you find fulfillment -- even if it comes from an unlikely or unexpected source.

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Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[db_lead] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[text] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and business person may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

 

1. Perfusionist

Never heard of this job before? Neither had we until we stumbled upon someone enthusing over it on Reddit. So what is a perfusionist? Also known as a cardiovascular perfusionist or clinical perfusionist, these specialized healthcare professionals are a critical part of any cardiothoracic team. Perfusionists are trained in operating heart-lung machines, which are used to temporarily replace both circulatory and respiratory function during cardiac surgery.

While this job can be stressful, it’s also incredibly fulfilling as perfusionists are directly involved in life-saving procedures. You can expect to be well-rewarded financially, as well: Experienced perfusionists can earn upwards of $100,000 a year.

You also can’t go wrong with this job in terms of security. As the population ages, the American Society for Extracorporeal Technology anticipates that demand will continue to rise for certified perfusionists.

 

2. Technical Writer

Technical companies may have amazing products and services, but if they can’t communicate their use to the public in an understandable way, they are unlikely to succeed. Enter technical writers.

These detail-oriented professionals typically have a combination of strong writing and critical thinking skills, along with a technical background which qualifies them to translate complex scientific or technical information in a coherent way. Technical writers work in a variety of industries with engineering and computer companies particularly in need of their services.

 

3. Accent Reduction Specialist

You may have never heard of accent reduction specialists before, but these professionals scored the top spot on a CNN roundup of “10 little-known fields with great job opportunities.”

So what do accent reduction specialists do? Simply put, they help people with strong accents and/or poor language skills learn to communicate better in order to break down barriers, change perception, and promote understanding. And while accent reduction specialists work with people with regional accents, their services are expected to be increasingly in demand with the globalization of the economy.

No formal certification is necessary to work in this field, but many accent reduction specialists begin their careers with an associate or bachelor’s degree in speech. Advanced studies in speech-language pathology, meanwhile, further qualify you to succeed as an accent reduction specialist.

 

4. Court Stenographer

Most people only think of lawyers and judges when they ponder legal careers, but the reality there are many different kinds of professionals working behind the scenes, including court stenographers. The most widely used form of recording court proceedings, stenography is the act of recording spoken words -- either through the use of a stenotype machine or shorthand.

In addition to working inside courtrooms, stenographers can also be found everywhere from corporate work to providing closed captioning services for the hard-of-hearing. Regardless of the setting, speed and accuracy are hallmarks of the best stenographers.

While many court stenographers are employed by legal entities, others work on a freelance basis. Your takeaway? If the thought of making your own schedule and working independently appeals to you, then you may have a bright future in this field -- which was listed by Business Insider as one of “16 Awesome Career Choices That Most College Kids Have Never Heard Of.”

 

5. Blacksmith

Also earning a spot on Business Insider’s list? Blacksmiths. Many people mistakenly assume that this craft -- which involves shaping iron and steel by forging them in fire --  is no longer practiced, but metalsmithing is very much alive and well today.

Blacksmithing involves far more than making horseshoes. It’s also a wonderful way to express your creativity. In fact, for people who enjoy design, working with their hands, and interacting with others, blacksmithing offers up a compelling counterpoint to an office job.

Wondering how to get started in blacksmithing? Programs like Fleming College’s Visual and Creative Arts Diploma (VCAD) offer exposure to foundational courses as well as studio-based learning and techniques in blacksmithing and other electives.

While conventional careers have plenty to offer, they can also be less-than-exciting, especially if you land on them by default. By researching as many potential career pathways as possible, you can ensure that you choose the one most likely to help you find fulfillment -- even if it comes from an unlikely or unexpected source.

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[db_lead] =>

Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[db_lead] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[text] =>

Probably not.  But it certainly can buy some peace of mind—especially when we’re talking about student debt.  A recent study from Purdue University suggests that while a certain income level may make you happy, you need to factor in debt to understand your overall happiness. 

Louis Tay, assistant professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University determined that “carrying student loan debt is almost as important as income in predicting financial worry and life satisfaction.”  Tay and his researchers, Cassondra Batz, Scott Parrigon, and Lauren Kuykendall, published the study in the Journal of Happiness Studies; they used an online college alumni sample of 2,781 people from the US.   Most students graduated in 2008, and have been carrying student debt for the past seven years.  Tay looked at relationships among average household income, student loan amount, life satisfaction, and sense of financial stress.  “We always think about how much income you can earn, but the reality is you can’t guarantee what you will earn post-college,” he said.  “There is a lot in the news about reducing, balancing, or managing college student debt, and this study shows the burden it can take on one’s life for the long term.”

Their findings?  The financial strain caused by student debt lowers your sense of well-being.  “A lot of people are pursuing a college education, which is a good thing,” said Tay.  “However, the financial cost of doing so also needs to be considered… There large loan numbers can sometimes be thrown around without us actually realizing [the] day-to-day impact on our lives.  We are now translating student loan debt to actual psychological and emotional burden.”

Your takeaway?  The key to your future happiness may lie in the amount of debt you already have—and are willing to take on.  Think carefully about your options and how you want your debt to influence your well-being.

Learn more about studying in the US

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Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[db_lead] =>

Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[text] =>

Probably not.  But it certainly can buy some peace of mind—especially when we’re talking about student debt.  A recent study from Purdue University suggests that while a certain income level may make you happy, you need to factor in debt to understand your overall happiness. 

Louis Tay, assistant professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University determined that “carrying student loan debt is almost as important as income in predicting financial worry and life satisfaction.”  Tay and his researchers, Cassondra Batz, Scott Parrigon, and Lauren Kuykendall, published the study in the Journal of Happiness Studies; they used an online college alumni sample of 2,781 people from the US.   Most students graduated in 2008, and have been carrying student debt for the past seven years.  Tay looked at relationships among average household income, student loan amount, life satisfaction, and sense of financial stress.  “We always think about how much income you can earn, but the reality is you can’t guarantee what you will earn post-college,” he said.  “There is a lot in the news about reducing, balancing, or managing college student debt, and this study shows the burden it can take on one’s life for the long term.”

Their findings?  The financial strain caused by student debt lowers your sense of well-being.  “A lot of people are pursuing a college education, which is a good thing,” said Tay.  “However, the financial cost of doing so also needs to be considered… There large loan numbers can sometimes be thrown around without us actually realizing [the] day-to-day impact on our lives.  We are now translating student loan debt to actual psychological and emotional burden.”

Your takeaway?  The key to your future happiness may lie in the amount of debt you already have—and are willing to take on.  Think carefully about your options and how you want your debt to influence your well-being.

Learn more about studying in the US

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Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[text] =>

From academic help to student life, and visas requirements to housing options, International Student Services offices around the world work hard to welcome and support international students from all walks of life.  Finding a university that matches your interests—and your needs—as an international student takes a bit of work.  We’ve put together a list of several factors for international students to consider when evaluating a prospective university.  Take a closer look. 

 

1. Numbers of Students

Generally speaking, if there are more international students on a campus, there are probably more resources.  At schools with big international populations, like Polk State College, or Centennial College, you can expect to find services for admissions counseling, social services, financial aid help, and mentoring programs.  One downside?  Make sure schools with larger international student populations have the services that match the numbers, otherwise you may experience a backlog and not get the help when you need it. 

Consider the benefits of schools with a small international student population, like Vilnius Business College in Lithuania or West Hills College in the US.  Just because a university, like the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, has a small international population doesn’t mean that there are no services.  It might just mean that the university has a smaller International Student Services office. Even small schools—some with as little as .5 percent of its population made up of international students—have services to help students with visas, travel, accommodations, the academic calendar, and familiarizing themselves with the community.  You might also get more personalized attention than you would at a larger school.

 

2. Mentoring Systems

Think about how a university welcomes its international students from the get-go. International students at top-rated Lund University in Sweden are greeted by student mentors and staff when they arrive at the airport.  Then they attend a fun social event where they meet other international students, and some of the faculty and staff in their programs.  Lund’s two-week orientation for all students combines special topics for international students on Swedish culture and food. Scotland’s University of Glasgow offers international students a similar welcome—and continued support with programs on Scotland’s history, and even workshops on budgeting and saving.

Why is this important?  You won’t succeed if you don’t feel welcomed by your new community.  Look for a school that works to welcome you and to continue to help you acclimate to your new school.

 

3. International Students Associations

Are there any on campus?  You’ll need more than just an International Student Services office—you’ll need the support of other international students. North Iowa Area Community College features an International Students and Friends Club for international and migrant students, as well as domestic students who want to get involved with the college’s international community. MIT is another example of a campus with a vibrant International Student Association.  In an effort to provide learning opportunities for all of its students, MIT allows domestic students to join the association also.  Their goal?  To promote cultural diversity on campus.  Not only to they offer delicious study breaks and fun trips, they also encourage students to get involved on their campus and the local community. 

 

4. Housing Help

You make “home” wherever you go in this world.  It’s nice to have help, especially when you’re not just new to the school, but new to the country, too.  Your International Student Office, like the ones at Western Iowa Tech Community College, College of Southern Idaho or Bifröst University in Iceland, should be able to direct you to on-campus options—and should also put you in touch with other students, faculty, and even local families who may have rooms or apartments for rent.  Think about what you want and how much money you want to spend.  If you want to save money, consider renting a room from a local family or a faculty member.  You can also contact your International Student Services office for help in finding a roommate. 

Studying abroad is one of the most exciting options you can consider as a student.   Bottom line?  Do your homework.  Research the schools where you might want to study.  Visit, if you can.  Talk to the staff at the International Student Services offices.  Get a feel for what you want—and focus on what you need. 

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Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[db_lead] =>

Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[text] =>

From academic help to student life, and visas requirements to housing options, International Student Services offices around the world work hard to welcome and support international students from all walks of life.  Finding a university that matches your interests—and your needs—as an international student takes a bit of work.  We’ve put together a list of several factors for international students to consider when evaluating a prospective university.  Take a closer look. 

 

1. Numbers of Students

Generally speaking, if there are more international students on a campus, there are probably more resources.  At schools with big international populations, like Polk State College, or Centennial College, you can expect to find services for admissions counseling, social services, financial aid help, and mentoring programs.  One downside?  Make sure schools with larger international student populations have the services that match the numbers, otherwise you may experience a backlog and not get the help when you need it. 

Consider the benefits of schools with a small international student population, like Vilnius Business College in Lithuania or West Hills College in the US.  Just because a university, like the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, has a small international population doesn’t mean that there are no services.  It might just mean that the university has a smaller International Student Services office. Even small schools—some with as little as .5 percent of its population made up of international students—have services to help students with visas, travel, accommodations, the academic calendar, and familiarizing themselves with the community.  You might also get more personalized attention than you would at a larger school.

 

2. Mentoring Systems

Think about how a university welcomes its international students from the get-go. International students at top-rated Lund University in Sweden are greeted by student mentors and staff when they arrive at the airport.  Then they attend a fun social event where they meet other international students, and some of the faculty and staff in their programs.  Lund’s two-week orientation for all students combines special topics for international students on Swedish culture and food. Scotland’s University of Glasgow offers international students a similar welcome—and continued support with programs on Scotland’s history, and even workshops on budgeting and saving.

Why is this important?  You won’t succeed if you don’t feel welcomed by your new community.  Look for a school that works to welcome you and to continue to help you acclimate to your new school.

 

3. International Students Associations

Are there any on campus?  You’ll need more than just an International Student Services office—you’ll need the support of other international students. North Iowa Area Community College features an International Students and Friends Club for international and migrant students, as well as domestic students who want to get involved with the college’s international community. MIT is another example of a campus with a vibrant International Student Association.  In an effort to provide learning opportunities for all of its students, MIT allows domestic students to join the association also.  Their goal?  To promote cultural diversity on campus.  Not only to they offer delicious study breaks and fun trips, they also encourage students to get involved on their campus and the local community. 

 

4. Housing Help

You make “home” wherever you go in this world.  It’s nice to have help, especially when you’re not just new to the school, but new to the country, too.  Your International Student Office, like the ones at Western Iowa Tech Community College, College of Southern Idaho or Bifröst University in Iceland, should be able to direct you to on-campus options—and should also put you in touch with other students, faculty, and even local families who may have rooms or apartments for rent.  Think about what you want and how much money you want to spend.  If you want to save money, consider renting a room from a local family or a faculty member.  You can also contact your International Student Services office for help in finding a roommate. 

Studying abroad is one of the most exciting options you can consider as a student.   Bottom line?  Do your homework.  Research the schools where you might want to study.  Visit, if you can.  Talk to the staff at the International Student Services offices.  Get a feel for what you want—and focus on what you need. 

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Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[text] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

About Learning Styles

According to an article published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the term learning style “refers to the fact that each person has a different way of accumulating knowledge.” This concept was first proposed in the 1970s, with a number of different models emerging to represent the way researchers believe human beings learn.

It’s important to note that while learning styles may indeed reflect individual preferences for how information is received, there’s no conclusive evidence indicating that identifying a person’s preferred learning style impacts outcomes. Still, many schools assess learning styles to help teachers and students alike better understand the process.

Understanding Learning Styles

Proposed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, the VARK model is one of the most commonly accepted classifications of learning styles. It comprises four modalities, including the following:

 

1. Visual (V)

Do you feel like you learn better through graphics? If so, you may be a visual learner. This mode includes the depiction of information via “maps, spider diagrams, charts, graphs, flow charts, labeled diagrams, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices, that people use to represent what could have been presented in words.”

Visual learning methods typically include patterns, shapes, designs and whitespace, but do not include pictures, photographs, videos, movies or even PowerPoint presentations. While words in boxes may be preferable for different types of learners, visual learners prefer that information be conveyed via diagrams, meaningful symbols, and other graphic formats.

For visual learners, seeking out courses which incorporate lots of visuals is a great start. Drawing visuals of problems; using graphing calculators; and developing your own visual aids, such as cognitive maps and charts, can further enrich your learning experience.

 

2. Aural/Auditory (A)

Do you feel like you take in information better when you hear it spoken aloud or say it out loud to yourself? If so, you may be an aural/auditory learner. According to VARK-Learn’s definition, individuals in this category learn best from “lectures, group discussion, radio, email, using mobile phones, speaking, web-chat and talking things through.”

Also included in this learning mode? Email -- because it is often conveyed and received “chat-style.” Aural/auditory learners also prefer sorting out their thoughts and questions aloud -- often repeating what they’ve heard aloud in their own words.

If you fall into the aural/auditory learning mode category, recommended study strategies include attending lectures; reading textbook information aloud; recording text materials as well as lectures; and choosing classes with opportunities for oral discussion.

 

3. Read/Write (R)

Are you all about words? Do you remember what you read better than what you hear? If so, you likely have a preference for the read/write learning modality. One of the most popular modes of learning for teachers and students, this category comprises “text-based input and output,” such as reading and writing assignments, essays, reports and manuals. Commonly relied on resources for read/write learners include dictionaries, quotations, the internet, PowerPoint, and lists.

Study strategies for students who prefer this learning style include reading textbooks; taking good notes; and choosing courses which focus on writing assignments.

 

4. Kinesthetic (K)

Do you learn best by doing? If so, your preference may be the increasingly prevalent kinesthetic model, which prioritizes the use of experience and practice over concepts and theory. According to VARK-Learn, “people who prefer this mode are connected to reality, either through concrete personal experiences, examples, practice or simulation.”  This active, tactile approach includes everything from demonstrations and simulations to videos and movies. Case studies, applications and practice (either real or simulated) are also preferred kinesthetic learning methods.

Kinesthetic learning can be particularly valuable to STEM students, according to edutopia, because it helps them breach mental barriers, accept different approaches to information, and ultimately assume a more “receptive state required for learning.”

Manipulative study strategies work well for kinesthetic learners, including writing, making visuals and models, using your fingers, and preparing index cards. Furthermore, incorporating movement while studying -- from chewing gum to tapping your pencil -- can help support focus and attention.

One last thing to keep in mind? Learning styles aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, research indicates that many students amalgamate a mix of learning styles. Even better? There’s no proof that a single learning style or combination of learning styles is more effective or less effective than another. Rather, it’s all about what works best for you.

 

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Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[db_lead] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[text] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

About Learning Styles

According to an article published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the term learning style “refers to the fact that each person has a different way of accumulating knowledge.” This concept was first proposed in the 1970s, with a number of different models emerging to represent the way researchers believe human beings learn.

It’s important to note that while learning styles may indeed reflect individual preferences for how information is received, there’s no conclusive evidence indicating that identifying a person’s preferred learning style impacts outcomes. Still, many schools assess learning styles to help teachers and students alike better understand the process.

Understanding Learning Styles

Proposed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, the VARK model is one of the most commonly accepted classifications of learning styles. It comprises four modalities, including the following:

 

1. Visual (V)

Do you feel like you learn better through graphics? If so, you may be a visual learner. This mode includes the depiction of information via “maps, spider diagrams, charts, graphs, flow charts, labeled diagrams, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices, that people use to represent what could have been presented in words.”

Visual learning methods typically include patterns, shapes, designs and whitespace, but do not include pictures, photographs, videos, movies or even PowerPoint presentations. While words in boxes may be preferable for different types of learners, visual learners prefer that information be conveyed via diagrams, meaningful symbols, and other graphic formats.

For visual learners, seeking out courses which incorporate lots of visuals is a great start. Drawing visuals of problems; using graphing calculators; and developing your own visual aids, such as cognitive maps and charts, can further enrich your learning experience.

 

2. Aural/Auditory (A)

Do you feel like you take in information better when you hear it spoken aloud or say it out loud to yourself? If so, you may be an aural/auditory learner. According to VARK-Learn’s definition, individuals in this category learn best from “lectures, group discussion, radio, email, using mobile phones, speaking, web-chat and talking things through.”

Also included in this learning mode? Email -- because it is often conveyed and received “chat-style.” Aural/auditory learners also prefer sorting out their thoughts and questions aloud -- often repeating what they’ve heard aloud in their own words.

If you fall into the aural/auditory learning mode category, recommended study strategies include attending lectures; reading textbook information aloud; recording text materials as well as lectures; and choosing classes with opportunities for oral discussion.

 

3. Read/Write (R)

Are you all about words? Do you remember what you read better than what you hear? If so, you likely have a preference for the read/write learning modality. One of the most popular modes of learning for teachers and students, this category comprises “text-based input and output,” such as reading and writing assignments, essays, reports and manuals. Commonly relied on resources for read/write learners include dictionaries, quotations, the internet, PowerPoint, and lists.

Study strategies for students who prefer this learning style include reading textbooks; taking good notes; and choosing courses which focus on writing assignments.

 

4. Kinesthetic (K)

Do you learn best by doing? If so, your preference may be the increasingly prevalent kinesthetic model, which prioritizes the use of experience and practice over concepts and theory. According to VARK-Learn, “people who prefer this mode are connected to reality, either through concrete personal experiences, examples, practice or simulation.”  This active, tactile approach includes everything from demonstrations and simulations to videos and movies. Case studies, applications and practice (either real or simulated) are also preferred kinesthetic learning methods.

Kinesthetic learning can be particularly valuable to STEM students, according to edutopia, because it helps them breach mental barriers, accept different approaches to information, and ultimately assume a more “receptive state required for learning.”

Manipulative study strategies work well for kinesthetic learners, including writing, making visuals and models, using your fingers, and preparing index cards. Furthermore, incorporating movement while studying -- from chewing gum to tapping your pencil -- can help support focus and attention.

One last thing to keep in mind? Learning styles aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, research indicates that many students amalgamate a mix of learning styles. Even better? There’s no proof that a single learning style or combination of learning styles is more effective or less effective than another. Rather, it’s all about what works best for you.

 

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Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[text] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and business person may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

 

1. Perfusionist

Never heard of this job before? Neither had we until we stumbled upon someone enthusing over it on Reddit. So what is a perfusionist? Also known as a cardiovascular perfusionist or clinical perfusionist, these specialized healthcare professionals are a critical part of any cardiothoracic team. Perfusionists are trained in operating heart-lung machines, which are used to temporarily replace both circulatory and respiratory function during cardiac surgery.

While this job can be stressful, it’s also incredibly fulfilling as perfusionists are directly involved in life-saving procedures. You can expect to be well-rewarded financially, as well: Experienced perfusionists can earn upwards of $100,000 a year.

You also can’t go wrong with this job in terms of security. As the population ages, the American Society for Extracorporeal Technology anticipates that demand will continue to rise for certified perfusionists.

 

2. Technical Writer

Technical companies may have amazing products and services, but if they can’t communicate their use to the public in an understandable way, they are unlikely to succeed. Enter technical writers.

These detail-oriented professionals typically have a combination of strong writing and critical thinking skills, along with a technical background which qualifies them to translate complex scientific or technical information in a coherent way. Technical writers work in a variety of industries with engineering and computer companies particularly in need of their services.

 

3. Accent Reduction Specialist

You may have never heard of accent reduction specialists before, but these professionals scored the top spot on a CNN roundup of “10 little-known fields with great job opportunities.”

So what do accent reduction specialists do? Simply put, they help people with strong accents and/or poor language skills learn to communicate better in order to break down barriers, change perception, and promote understanding. And while accent reduction specialists work with people with regional accents, their services are expected to be increasingly in demand with the globalization of the economy.

No formal certification is necessary to work in this field, but many accent reduction specialists begin their careers with an associate or bachelor’s degree in speech. Advanced studies in speech-language pathology, meanwhile, further qualify you to succeed as an accent reduction specialist.

 

4. Court Stenographer

Most people only think of lawyers and judges when they ponder legal careers, but the reality there are many different kinds of professionals working behind the scenes, including court stenographers. The most widely used form of recording court proceedings, stenography is the act of recording spoken words -- either through the use of a stenotype machine or shorthand.

In addition to working inside courtrooms, stenographers can also be found everywhere from corporate work to providing closed captioning services for the hard-of-hearing. Regardless of the setting, speed and accuracy are hallmarks of the best stenographers.

While many court stenographers are employed by legal entities, others work on a freelance basis. Your takeaway? If the thought of making your own schedule and working independently appeals to you, then you may have a bright future in this field -- which was listed by Business Insider as one of “16 Awesome Career Choices That Most College Kids Have Never Heard Of.”

 

5. Blacksmith

Also earning a spot on Business Insider’s list? Blacksmiths. Many people mistakenly assume that this craft -- which involves shaping iron and steel by forging them in fire --  is no longer practiced, but metalsmithing is very much alive and well today.

Blacksmithing involves far more than making horseshoes. It’s also a wonderful way to express your creativity. In fact, for people who enjoy design, working with their hands, and interacting with others, blacksmithing offers up a compelling counterpoint to an office job.

Wondering how to get started in blacksmithing? Programs like Fleming College’s Visual and Creative Arts Diploma (VCAD) offer exposure to foundational courses as well as studio-based learning and techniques in blacksmithing and other electives.

While conventional careers have plenty to offer, they can also be less-than-exciting, especially if you land on them by default. By researching as many potential career pathways as possible, you can ensure that you choose the one most likely to help you find fulfillment -- even if it comes from an unlikely or unexpected source.

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Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[db_lead] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[text] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and business person may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

 

1. Perfusionist

Never heard of this job before? Neither had we until we stumbled upon someone enthusing over it on Reddit. So what is a perfusionist? Also known as a cardiovascular perfusionist or clinical perfusionist, these specialized healthcare professionals are a critical part of any cardiothoracic team. Perfusionists are trained in operating heart-lung machines, which are used to temporarily replace both circulatory and respiratory function during cardiac surgery.

While this job can be stressful, it’s also incredibly fulfilling as perfusionists are directly involved in life-saving procedures. You can expect to be well-rewarded financially, as well: Experienced perfusionists can earn upwards of $100,000 a year.

You also can’t go wrong with this job in terms of security. As the population ages, the American Society for Extracorporeal Technology anticipates that demand will continue to rise for certified perfusionists.

 

2. Technical Writer

Technical companies may have amazing products and services, but if they can’t communicate their use to the public in an understandable way, they are unlikely to succeed. Enter technical writers.

These detail-oriented professionals typically have a combination of strong writing and critical thinking skills, along with a technical background which qualifies them to translate complex scientific or technical information in a coherent way. Technical writers work in a variety of industries with engineering and computer companies particularly in need of their services.

 

3. Accent Reduction Specialist

You may have never heard of accent reduction specialists before, but these professionals scored the top spot on a CNN roundup of “10 little-known fields with great job opportunities.”

So what do accent reduction specialists do? Simply put, they help people with strong accents and/or poor language skills learn to communicate better in order to break down barriers, change perception, and promote understanding. And while accent reduction specialists work with people with regional accents, their services are expected to be increasingly in demand with the globalization of the economy.

No formal certification is necessary to work in this field, but many accent reduction specialists begin their careers with an associate or bachelor’s degree in speech. Advanced studies in speech-language pathology, meanwhile, further qualify you to succeed as an accent reduction specialist.

 

4. Court Stenographer

Most people only think of lawyers and judges when they ponder legal careers, but the reality there are many different kinds of professionals working behind the scenes, including court stenographers. The most widely used form of recording court proceedings, stenography is the act of recording spoken words -- either through the use of a stenotype machine or shorthand.

In addition to working inside courtrooms, stenographers can also be found everywhere from corporate work to providing closed captioning services for the hard-of-hearing. Regardless of the setting, speed and accuracy are hallmarks of the best stenographers.

While many court stenographers are employed by legal entities, others work on a freelance basis. Your takeaway? If the thought of making your own schedule and working independently appeals to you, then you may have a bright future in this field -- which was listed by Business Insider as one of “16 Awesome Career Choices That Most College Kids Have Never Heard Of.”

 

5. Blacksmith

Also earning a spot on Business Insider’s list? Blacksmiths. Many people mistakenly assume that this craft -- which involves shaping iron and steel by forging them in fire --  is no longer practiced, but metalsmithing is very much alive and well today.

Blacksmithing involves far more than making horseshoes. It’s also a wonderful way to express your creativity. In fact, for people who enjoy design, working with their hands, and interacting with others, blacksmithing offers up a compelling counterpoint to an office job.

Wondering how to get started in blacksmithing? Programs like Fleming College’s Visual and Creative Arts Diploma (VCAD) offer exposure to foundational courses as well as studio-based learning and techniques in blacksmithing and other electives.

While conventional careers have plenty to offer, they can also be less-than-exciting, especially if you land on them by default. By researching as many potential career pathways as possible, you can ensure that you choose the one most likely to help you find fulfillment -- even if it comes from an unlikely or unexpected source.

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[db_lead] =>

Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[db_lead] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[text] =>

Probably not.  But it certainly can buy some peace of mind—especially when we’re talking about student debt.  A recent study from Purdue University suggests that while a certain income level may make you happy, you need to factor in debt to understand your overall happiness. 

Louis Tay, assistant professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University determined that “carrying student loan debt is almost as important as income in predicting financial worry and life satisfaction.”  Tay and his researchers, Cassondra Batz, Scott Parrigon, and Lauren Kuykendall, published the study in the Journal of Happiness Studies; they used an online college alumni sample of 2,781 people from the US.   Most students graduated in 2008, and have been carrying student debt for the past seven years.  Tay looked at relationships among average household income, student loan amount, life satisfaction, and sense of financial stress.  “We always think about how much income you can earn, but the reality is you can’t guarantee what you will earn post-college,” he said.  “There is a lot in the news about reducing, balancing, or managing college student debt, and this study shows the burden it can take on one’s life for the long term.”

Their findings?  The financial strain caused by student debt lowers your sense of well-being.  “A lot of people are pursuing a college education, which is a good thing,” said Tay.  “However, the financial cost of doing so also needs to be considered… There large loan numbers can sometimes be thrown around without us actually realizing [the] day-to-day impact on our lives.  We are now translating student loan debt to actual psychological and emotional burden.”

Your takeaway?  The key to your future happiness may lie in the amount of debt you already have—and are willing to take on.  Think carefully about your options and how you want your debt to influence your well-being.

Learn more about studying in the US

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Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[db_lead] =>

Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[text] =>

Probably not.  But it certainly can buy some peace of mind—especially when we’re talking about student debt.  A recent study from Purdue University suggests that while a certain income level may make you happy, you need to factor in debt to understand your overall happiness. 

Louis Tay, assistant professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University determined that “carrying student loan debt is almost as important as income in predicting financial worry and life satisfaction.”  Tay and his researchers, Cassondra Batz, Scott Parrigon, and Lauren Kuykendall, published the study in the Journal of Happiness Studies; they used an online college alumni sample of 2,781 people from the US.   Most students graduated in 2008, and have been carrying student debt for the past seven years.  Tay looked at relationships among average household income, student loan amount, life satisfaction, and sense of financial stress.  “We always think about how much income you can earn, but the reality is you can’t guarantee what you will earn post-college,” he said.  “There is a lot in the news about reducing, balancing, or managing college student debt, and this study shows the burden it can take on one’s life for the long term.”

Their findings?  The financial strain caused by student debt lowers your sense of well-being.  “A lot of people are pursuing a college education, which is a good thing,” said Tay.  “However, the financial cost of doing so also needs to be considered… There large loan numbers can sometimes be thrown around without us actually realizing [the] day-to-day impact on our lives.  We are now translating student loan debt to actual psychological and emotional burden.”

Your takeaway?  The key to your future happiness may lie in the amount of debt you already have—and are willing to take on.  Think carefully about your options and how you want your debt to influence your well-being.

Learn more about studying in the US

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Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[text] =>

From academic help to student life, and visas requirements to housing options, International Student Services offices around the world work hard to welcome and support international students from all walks of life.  Finding a university that matches your interests—and your needs—as an international student takes a bit of work.  We’ve put together a list of several factors for international students to consider when evaluating a prospective university.  Take a closer look. 

 

1. Numbers of Students

Generally speaking, if there are more international students on a campus, there are probably more resources.  At schools with big international populations, like Polk State College, or Centennial College, you can expect to find services for admissions counseling, social services, financial aid help, and mentoring programs.  One downside?  Make sure schools with larger international student populations have the services that match the numbers, otherwise you may experience a backlog and not get the help when you need it. 

Consider the benefits of schools with a small international student population, like Vilnius Business College in Lithuania or West Hills College in the US.  Just because a university, like the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, has a small international population doesn’t mean that there are no services.  It might just mean that the university has a smaller International Student Services office. Even small schools—some with as little as .5 percent of its population made up of international students—have services to help students with visas, travel, accommodations, the academic calendar, and familiarizing themselves with the community.  You might also get more personalized attention than you would at a larger school.

 

2. Mentoring Systems

Think about how a university welcomes its international students from the get-go. International students at top-rated Lund University in Sweden are greeted by student mentors and staff when they arrive at the airport.  Then they attend a fun social event where they meet other international students, and some of the faculty and staff in their programs.  Lund’s two-week orientation for all students combines special topics for international students on Swedish culture and food. Scotland’s University of Glasgow offers international students a similar welcome—and continued support with programs on Scotland’s history, and even workshops on budgeting and saving.

Why is this important?  You won’t succeed if you don’t feel welcomed by your new community.  Look for a school that works to welcome you and to continue to help you acclimate to your new school.

 

3. International Students Associations

Are there any on campus?  You’ll need more than just an International Student Services office—you’ll need the support of other international students. North Iowa Area Community College features an International Students and Friends Club for international and migrant students, as well as domestic students who want to get involved with the college’s international community. MIT is another example of a campus with a vibrant International Student Association.  In an effort to provide learning opportunities for all of its students, MIT allows domestic students to join the association also.  Their goal?  To promote cultural diversity on campus.  Not only to they offer delicious study breaks and fun trips, they also encourage students to get involved on their campus and the local community. 

 

4. Housing Help

You make “home” wherever you go in this world.  It’s nice to have help, especially when you’re not just new to the school, but new to the country, too.  Your International Student Office, like the ones at Western Iowa Tech Community College, College of Southern Idaho or Bifröst University in Iceland, should be able to direct you to on-campus options—and should also put you in touch with other students, faculty, and even local families who may have rooms or apartments for rent.  Think about what you want and how much money you want to spend.  If you want to save money, consider renting a room from a local family or a faculty member.  You can also contact your International Student Services office for help in finding a roommate. 

Studying abroad is one of the most exciting options you can consider as a student.   Bottom line?  Do your homework.  Research the schools where you might want to study.  Visit, if you can.  Talk to the staff at the International Student Services offices.  Get a feel for what you want—and focus on what you need. 

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Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[db_lead] =>

Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[text] =>

From academic help to student life, and visas requirements to housing options, International Student Services offices around the world work hard to welcome and support international students from all walks of life.  Finding a university that matches your interests—and your needs—as an international student takes a bit of work.  We’ve put together a list of several factors for international students to consider when evaluating a prospective university.  Take a closer look. 

 

1. Numbers of Students

Generally speaking, if there are more international students on a campus, there are probably more resources.  At schools with big international populations, like Polk State College, or Centennial College, you can expect to find services for admissions counseling, social services, financial aid help, and mentoring programs.  One downside?  Make sure schools with larger international student populations have the services that match the numbers, otherwise you may experience a backlog and not get the help when you need it. 

Consider the benefits of schools with a small international student population, like Vilnius Business College in Lithuania or West Hills College in the US.  Just because a university, like the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, has a small international population doesn’t mean that there are no services.  It might just mean that the university has a smaller International Student Services office. Even small schools—some with as little as .5 percent of its population made up of international students—have services to help students with visas, travel, accommodations, the academic calendar, and familiarizing themselves with the community.  You might also get more personalized attention than you would at a larger school.

 

2. Mentoring Systems

Think about how a university welcomes its international students from the get-go. International students at top-rated Lund University in Sweden are greeted by student mentors and staff when they arrive at the airport.  Then they attend a fun social event where they meet other international students, and some of the faculty and staff in their programs.  Lund’s two-week orientation for all students combines special topics for international students on Swedish culture and food. Scotland’s University of Glasgow offers international students a similar welcome—and continued support with programs on Scotland’s history, and even workshops on budgeting and saving.

Why is this important?  You won’t succeed if you don’t feel welcomed by your new community.  Look for a school that works to welcome you and to continue to help you acclimate to your new school.

 

3. International Students Associations

Are there any on campus?  You’ll need more than just an International Student Services office—you’ll need the support of other international students. North Iowa Area Community College features an International Students and Friends Club for international and migrant students, as well as domestic students who want to get involved with the college’s international community. MIT is another example of a campus with a vibrant International Student Association.  In an effort to provide learning opportunities for all of its students, MIT allows domestic students to join the association also.  Their goal?  To promote cultural diversity on campus.  Not only to they offer delicious study breaks and fun trips, they also encourage students to get involved on their campus and the local community. 

 

4. Housing Help

You make “home” wherever you go in this world.  It’s nice to have help, especially when you’re not just new to the school, but new to the country, too.  Your International Student Office, like the ones at Western Iowa Tech Community College, College of Southern Idaho or Bifröst University in Iceland, should be able to direct you to on-campus options—and should also put you in touch with other students, faculty, and even local families who may have rooms or apartments for rent.  Think about what you want and how much money you want to spend.  If you want to save money, consider renting a room from a local family or a faculty member.  You can also contact your International Student Services office for help in finding a roommate. 

Studying abroad is one of the most exciting options you can consider as a student.   Bottom line?  Do your homework.  Research the schools where you might want to study.  Visit, if you can.  Talk to the staff at the International Student Services offices.  Get a feel for what you want—and focus on what you need. 

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Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[text] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

About Learning Styles

According to an article published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the term learning style “refers to the fact that each person has a different way of accumulating knowledge.” This concept was first proposed in the 1970s, with a number of different models emerging to represent the way researchers believe human beings learn.

It’s important to note that while learning styles may indeed reflect individual preferences for how information is received, there’s no conclusive evidence indicating that identifying a person’s preferred learning style impacts outcomes. Still, many schools assess learning styles to help teachers and students alike better understand the process.

Understanding Learning Styles

Proposed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, the VARK model is one of the most commonly accepted classifications of learning styles. It comprises four modalities, including the following:

 

1. Visual (V)

Do you feel like you learn better through graphics? If so, you may be a visual learner. This mode includes the depiction of information via “maps, spider diagrams, charts, graphs, flow charts, labeled diagrams, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices, that people use to represent what could have been presented in words.”

Visual learning methods typically include patterns, shapes, designs and whitespace, but do not include pictures, photographs, videos, movies or even PowerPoint presentations. While words in boxes may be preferable for different types of learners, visual learners prefer that information be conveyed via diagrams, meaningful symbols, and other graphic formats.

For visual learners, seeking out courses which incorporate lots of visuals is a great start. Drawing visuals of problems; using graphing calculators; and developing your own visual aids, such as cognitive maps and charts, can further enrich your learning experience.

 

2. Aural/Auditory (A)

Do you feel like you take in information better when you hear it spoken aloud or say it out loud to yourself? If so, you may be an aural/auditory learner. According to VARK-Learn’s definition, individuals in this category learn best from “lectures, group discussion, radio, email, using mobile phones, speaking, web-chat and talking things through.”

Also included in this learning mode? Email -- because it is often conveyed and received “chat-style.” Aural/auditory learners also prefer sorting out their thoughts and questions aloud -- often repeating what they’ve heard aloud in their own words.

If you fall into the aural/auditory learning mode category, recommended study strategies include attending lectures; reading textbook information aloud; recording text materials as well as lectures; and choosing classes with opportunities for oral discussion.

 

3. Read/Write (R)

Are you all about words? Do you remember what you read better than what you hear? If so, you likely have a preference for the read/write learning modality. One of the most popular modes of learning for teachers and students, this category comprises “text-based input and output,” such as reading and writing assignments, essays, reports and manuals. Commonly relied on resources for read/write learners include dictionaries, quotations, the internet, PowerPoint, and lists.

Study strategies for students who prefer this learning style include reading textbooks; taking good notes; and choosing courses which focus on writing assignments.

 

4. Kinesthetic (K)

Do you learn best by doing? If so, your preference may be the increasingly prevalent kinesthetic model, which prioritizes the use of experience and practice over concepts and theory. According to VARK-Learn, “people who prefer this mode are connected to reality, either through concrete personal experiences, examples, practice or simulation.”  This active, tactile approach includes everything from demonstrations and simulations to videos and movies. Case studies, applications and practice (either real or simulated) are also preferred kinesthetic learning methods.

Kinesthetic learning can be particularly valuable to STEM students, according to edutopia, because it helps them breach mental barriers, accept different approaches to information, and ultimately assume a more “receptive state required for learning.”

Manipulative study strategies work well for kinesthetic learners, including writing, making visuals and models, using your fingers, and preparing index cards. Furthermore, incorporating movement while studying -- from chewing gum to tapping your pencil -- can help support focus and attention.

One last thing to keep in mind? Learning styles aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, research indicates that many students amalgamate a mix of learning styles. Even better? There’s no proof that a single learning style or combination of learning styles is more effective or less effective than another. Rather, it’s all about what works best for you.

 

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Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[db_lead] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[text] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

About Learning Styles

According to an article published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the term learning style “refers to the fact that each person has a different way of accumulating knowledge.” This concept was first proposed in the 1970s, with a number of different models emerging to represent the way researchers believe human beings learn.

It’s important to note that while learning styles may indeed reflect individual preferences for how information is received, there’s no conclusive evidence indicating that identifying a person’s preferred learning style impacts outcomes. Still, many schools assess learning styles to help teachers and students alike better understand the process.

Understanding Learning Styles

Proposed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, the VARK model is one of the most commonly accepted classifications of learning styles. It comprises four modalities, including the following:

 

1. Visual (V)

Do you feel like you learn better through graphics? If so, you may be a visual learner. This mode includes the depiction of information via “maps, spider diagrams, charts, graphs, flow charts, labeled diagrams, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices, that people use to represent what could have been presented in words.”

Visual learning methods typically include patterns, shapes, designs and whitespace, but do not include pictures, photographs, videos, movies or even PowerPoint presentations. While words in boxes may be preferable for different types of learners, visual learners prefer that information be conveyed via diagrams, meaningful symbols, and other graphic formats.

For visual learners, seeking out courses which incorporate lots of visuals is a great start. Drawing visuals of problems; using graphing calculators; and developing your own visual aids, such as cognitive maps and charts, can further enrich your learning experience.

 

2. Aural/Auditory (A)

Do you feel like you take in information better when you hear it spoken aloud or say it out loud to yourself? If so, you may be an aural/auditory learner. According to VARK-Learn’s definition, individuals in this category learn best from “lectures, group discussion, radio, email, using mobile phones, speaking, web-chat and talking things through.”

Also included in this learning mode? Email -- because it is often conveyed and received “chat-style.” Aural/auditory learners also prefer sorting out their thoughts and questions aloud -- often repeating what they’ve heard aloud in their own words.

If you fall into the aural/auditory learning mode category, recommended study strategies include attending lectures; reading textbook information aloud; recording text materials as well as lectures; and choosing classes with opportunities for oral discussion.

 

3. Read/Write (R)

Are you all about words? Do you remember what you read better than what you hear? If so, you likely have a preference for the read/write learning modality. One of the most popular modes of learning for teachers and students, this category comprises “text-based input and output,” such as reading and writing assignments, essays, reports and manuals. Commonly relied on resources for read/write learners include dictionaries, quotations, the internet, PowerPoint, and lists.

Study strategies for students who prefer this learning style include reading textbooks; taking good notes; and choosing courses which focus on writing assignments.

 

4. Kinesthetic (K)

Do you learn best by doing? If so, your preference may be the increasingly prevalent kinesthetic model, which prioritizes the use of experience and practice over concepts and theory. According to VARK-Learn, “people who prefer this mode are connected to reality, either through concrete personal experiences, examples, practice or simulation.”  This active, tactile approach includes everything from demonstrations and simulations to videos and movies. Case studies, applications and practice (either real or simulated) are also preferred kinesthetic learning methods.

Kinesthetic learning can be particularly valuable to STEM students, according to edutopia, because it helps them breach mental barriers, accept different approaches to information, and ultimately assume a more “receptive state required for learning.”

Manipulative study strategies work well for kinesthetic learners, including writing, making visuals and models, using your fingers, and preparing index cards. Furthermore, incorporating movement while studying -- from chewing gum to tapping your pencil -- can help support focus and attention.

One last thing to keep in mind? Learning styles aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, research indicates that many students amalgamate a mix of learning styles. Even better? There’s no proof that a single learning style or combination of learning styles is more effective or less effective than another. Rather, it’s all about what works best for you.

 

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Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[text] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and business person may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

 

1. Perfusionist

Never heard of this job before? Neither had we until we stumbled upon someone enthusing over it on Reddit. So what is a perfusionist? Also known as a cardiovascular perfusionist or clinical perfusionist, these specialized healthcare professionals are a critical part of any cardiothoracic team. Perfusionists are trained in operating heart-lung machines, which are used to temporarily replace both circulatory and respiratory function during cardiac surgery.

While this job can be stressful, it’s also incredibly fulfilling as perfusionists are directly involved in life-saving procedures. You can expect to be well-rewarded financially, as well: Experienced perfusionists can earn upwards of $100,000 a year.

You also can’t go wrong with this job in terms of security. As the population ages, the American Society for Extracorporeal Technology anticipates that demand will continue to rise for certified perfusionists.

 

2. Technical Writer

Technical companies may have amazing products and services, but if they can’t communicate their use to the public in an understandable way, they are unlikely to succeed. Enter technical writers.

These detail-oriented professionals typically have a combination of strong writing and critical thinking skills, along with a technical background which qualifies them to translate complex scientific or technical information in a coherent way. Technical writers work in a variety of industries with engineering and computer companies particularly in need of their services.

 

3. Accent Reduction Specialist

You may have never heard of accent reduction specialists before, but these professionals scored the top spot on a CNN roundup of “10 little-known fields with great job opportunities.”

So what do accent reduction specialists do? Simply put, they help people with strong accents and/or poor language skills learn to communicate better in order to break down barriers, change perception, and promote understanding. And while accent reduction specialists work with people with regional accents, their services are expected to be increasingly in demand with the globalization of the economy.

No formal certification is necessary to work in this field, but many accent reduction specialists begin their careers with an associate or bachelor’s degree in speech. Advanced studies in speech-language pathology, meanwhile, further qualify you to succeed as an accent reduction specialist.

 

4. Court Stenographer

Most people only think of lawyers and judges when they ponder legal careers, but the reality there are many different kinds of professionals working behind the scenes, including court stenographers. The most widely used form of recording court proceedings, stenography is the act of recording spoken words -- either through the use of a stenotype machine or shorthand.

In addition to working inside courtrooms, stenographers can also be found everywhere from corporate work to providing closed captioning services for the hard-of-hearing. Regardless of the setting, speed and accuracy are hallmarks of the best stenographers.

While many court stenographers are employed by legal entities, others work on a freelance basis. Your takeaway? If the thought of making your own schedule and working independently appeals to you, then you may have a bright future in this field -- which was listed by Business Insider as one of “16 Awesome Career Choices That Most College Kids Have Never Heard Of.”

 

5. Blacksmith

Also earning a spot on Business Insider’s list? Blacksmiths. Many people mistakenly assume that this craft -- which involves shaping iron and steel by forging them in fire --  is no longer practiced, but metalsmithing is very much alive and well today.

Blacksmithing involves far more than making horseshoes. It’s also a wonderful way to express your creativity. In fact, for people who enjoy design, working with their hands, and interacting with others, blacksmithing offers up a compelling counterpoint to an office job.

Wondering how to get started in blacksmithing? Programs like Fleming College’s Visual and Creative Arts Diploma (VCAD) offer exposure to foundational courses as well as studio-based learning and techniques in blacksmithing and other electives.

While conventional careers have plenty to offer, they can also be less-than-exciting, especially if you land on them by default. By researching as many potential career pathways as possible, you can ensure that you choose the one most likely to help you find fulfillment -- even if it comes from an unlikely or unexpected source.

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Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[db_lead] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[text] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and business person may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

 

1. Perfusionist

Never heard of this job before? Neither had we until we stumbled upon someone enthusing over it on Reddit. So what is a perfusionist? Also known as a cardiovascular perfusionist or clinical perfusionist, these specialized healthcare professionals are a critical part of any cardiothoracic team. Perfusionists are trained in operating heart-lung machines, which are used to temporarily replace both circulatory and respiratory function during cardiac surgery.

While this job can be stressful, it’s also incredibly fulfilling as perfusionists are directly involved in life-saving procedures. You can expect to be well-rewarded financially, as well: Experienced perfusionists can earn upwards of $100,000 a year.

You also can’t go wrong with this job in terms of security. As the population ages, the American Society for Extracorporeal Technology anticipates that demand will continue to rise for certified perfusionists.

 

2. Technical Writer

Technical companies may have amazing products and services, but if they can’t communicate their use to the public in an understandable way, they are unlikely to succeed. Enter technical writers.

These detail-oriented professionals typically have a combination of strong writing and critical thinking skills, along with a technical background which qualifies them to translate complex scientific or technical information in a coherent way. Technical writers work in a variety of industries with engineering and computer companies particularly in need of their services.

 

3. Accent Reduction Specialist

You may have never heard of accent reduction specialists before, but these professionals scored the top spot on a CNN roundup of “10 little-known fields with great job opportunities.”

So what do accent reduction specialists do? Simply put, they help people with strong accents and/or poor language skills learn to communicate better in order to break down barriers, change perception, and promote understanding. And while accent reduction specialists work with people with regional accents, their services are expected to be increasingly in demand with the globalization of the economy.

No formal certification is necessary to work in this field, but many accent reduction specialists begin their careers with an associate or bachelor’s degree in speech. Advanced studies in speech-language pathology, meanwhile, further qualify you to succeed as an accent reduction specialist.

 

4. Court Stenographer

Most people only think of lawyers and judges when they ponder legal careers, but the reality there are many different kinds of professionals working behind the scenes, including court stenographers. The most widely used form of recording court proceedings, stenography is the act of recording spoken words -- either through the use of a stenotype machine or shorthand.

In addition to working inside courtrooms, stenographers can also be found everywhere from corporate work to providing closed captioning services for the hard-of-hearing. Regardless of the setting, speed and accuracy are hallmarks of the best stenographers.

While many court stenographers are employed by legal entities, others work on a freelance basis. Your takeaway? If the thought of making your own schedule and working independently appeals to you, then you may have a bright future in this field -- which was listed by Business Insider as one of “16 Awesome Career Choices That Most College Kids Have Never Heard Of.”

 

5. Blacksmith

Also earning a spot on Business Insider’s list? Blacksmiths. Many people mistakenly assume that this craft -- which involves shaping iron and steel by forging them in fire --  is no longer practiced, but metalsmithing is very much alive and well today.

Blacksmithing involves far more than making horseshoes. It’s also a wonderful way to express your creativity. In fact, for people who enjoy design, working with their hands, and interacting with others, blacksmithing offers up a compelling counterpoint to an office job.

Wondering how to get started in blacksmithing? Programs like Fleming College’s Visual and Creative Arts Diploma (VCAD) offer exposure to foundational courses as well as studio-based learning and techniques in blacksmithing and other electives.

While conventional careers have plenty to offer, they can also be less-than-exciting, especially if you land on them by default. By researching as many potential career pathways as possible, you can ensure that you choose the one most likely to help you find fulfillment -- even if it comes from an unlikely or unexpected source.

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[db_lead] =>

Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[db_lead] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[text] =>

Probably not.  But it certainly can buy some peace of mind—especially when we’re talking about student debt.  A recent study from Purdue University suggests that while a certain income level may make you happy, you need to factor in debt to understand your overall happiness. 

Louis Tay, assistant professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University determined that “carrying student loan debt is almost as important as income in predicting financial worry and life satisfaction.”  Tay and his researchers, Cassondra Batz, Scott Parrigon, and Lauren Kuykendall, published the study in the Journal of Happiness Studies; they used an online college alumni sample of 2,781 people from the US.   Most students graduated in 2008, and have been carrying student debt for the past seven years.  Tay looked at relationships among average household income, student loan amount, life satisfaction, and sense of financial stress.  “We always think about how much income you can earn, but the reality is you can’t guarantee what you will earn post-college,” he said.  “There is a lot in the news about reducing, balancing, or managing college student debt, and this study shows the burden it can take on one’s life for the long term.”

Their findings?  The financial strain caused by student debt lowers your sense of well-being.  “A lot of people are pursuing a college education, which is a good thing,” said Tay.  “However, the financial cost of doing so also needs to be considered… There large loan numbers can sometimes be thrown around without us actually realizing [the] day-to-day impact on our lives.  We are now translating student loan debt to actual psychological and emotional burden.”

Your takeaway?  The key to your future happiness may lie in the amount of debt you already have—and are willing to take on.  Think carefully about your options and how you want your debt to influence your well-being.

Learn more about studying in the US

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Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[db_lead] =>

Got debt?  Think again.  Researchers at Purdue University recently found that increases in student loan debt may result in a decreased sense of well-being after graduation.  Find out more about the effects of student loan debt on happiness. 

,[text] =>

Probably not.  But it certainly can buy some peace of mind—especially when we’re talking about student debt.  A recent study from Purdue University suggests that while a certain income level may make you happy, you need to factor in debt to understand your overall happiness. 

Louis Tay, assistant professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University determined that “carrying student loan debt is almost as important as income in predicting financial worry and life satisfaction.”  Tay and his researchers, Cassondra Batz, Scott Parrigon, and Lauren Kuykendall, published the study in the Journal of Happiness Studies; they used an online college alumni sample of 2,781 people from the US.   Most students graduated in 2008, and have been carrying student debt for the past seven years.  Tay looked at relationships among average household income, student loan amount, life satisfaction, and sense of financial stress.  “We always think about how much income you can earn, but the reality is you can’t guarantee what you will earn post-college,” he said.  “There is a lot in the news about reducing, balancing, or managing college student debt, and this study shows the burden it can take on one’s life for the long term.”

Their findings?  The financial strain caused by student debt lowers your sense of well-being.  “A lot of people are pursuing a college education, which is a good thing,” said Tay.  “However, the financial cost of doing so also needs to be considered… There large loan numbers can sometimes be thrown around without us actually realizing [the] day-to-day impact on our lives.  We are now translating student loan debt to actual psychological and emotional burden.”

Your takeaway?  The key to your future happiness may lie in the amount of debt you already have—and are willing to take on.  Think carefully about your options and how you want your debt to influence your well-being.

Learn more about studying in the US

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Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[text] =>

From academic help to student life, and visas requirements to housing options, International Student Services offices around the world work hard to welcome and support international students from all walks of life.  Finding a university that matches your interests—and your needs—as an international student takes a bit of work.  We’ve put together a list of several factors for international students to consider when evaluating a prospective university.  Take a closer look. 

 

1. Numbers of Students

Generally speaking, if there are more international students on a campus, there are probably more resources.  At schools with big international populations, like Polk State College, or Centennial College, you can expect to find services for admissions counseling, social services, financial aid help, and mentoring programs.  One downside?  Make sure schools with larger international student populations have the services that match the numbers, otherwise you may experience a backlog and not get the help when you need it. 

Consider the benefits of schools with a small international student population, like Vilnius Business College in Lithuania or West Hills College in the US.  Just because a university, like the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, has a small international population doesn’t mean that there are no services.  It might just mean that the university has a smaller International Student Services office. Even small schools—some with as little as .5 percent of its population made up of international students—have services to help students with visas, travel, accommodations, the academic calendar, and familiarizing themselves with the community.  You might also get more personalized attention than you would at a larger school.

 

2. Mentoring Systems

Think about how a university welcomes its international students from the get-go. International students at top-rated Lund University in Sweden are greeted by student mentors and staff when they arrive at the airport.  Then they attend a fun social event where they meet other international students, and some of the faculty and staff in their programs.  Lund’s two-week orientation for all students combines special topics for international students on Swedish culture and food. Scotland’s University of Glasgow offers international students a similar welcome—and continued support with programs on Scotland’s history, and even workshops on budgeting and saving.

Why is this important?  You won’t succeed if you don’t feel welcomed by your new community.  Look for a school that works to welcome you and to continue to help you acclimate to your new school.

 

3. International Students Associations

Are there any on campus?  You’ll need more than just an International Student Services office—you’ll need the support of other international students. North Iowa Area Community College features an International Students and Friends Club for international and migrant students, as well as domestic students who want to get involved with the college’s international community. MIT is another example of a campus with a vibrant International Student Association.  In an effort to provide learning opportunities for all of its students, MIT allows domestic students to join the association also.  Their goal?  To promote cultural diversity on campus.  Not only to they offer delicious study breaks and fun trips, they also encourage students to get involved on their campus and the local community. 

 

4. Housing Help

You make “home” wherever you go in this world.  It’s nice to have help, especially when you’re not just new to the school, but new to the country, too.  Your International Student Office, like the ones at Western Iowa Tech Community College, College of Southern Idaho or Bifröst University in Iceland, should be able to direct you to on-campus options—and should also put you in touch with other students, faculty, and even local families who may have rooms or apartments for rent.  Think about what you want and how much money you want to spend.  If you want to save money, consider renting a room from a local family or a faculty member.  You can also contact your International Student Services office for help in finding a roommate. 

Studying abroad is one of the most exciting options you can consider as a student.   Bottom line?  Do your homework.  Research the schools where you might want to study.  Visit, if you can.  Talk to the staff at the International Student Services offices.  Get a feel for what you want—and focus on what you need. 

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Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[db_lead] =>

Studying abroad?  Think about the services you may want and need—and the type of International Student Services available at prospective schools.  We’ve been together a list of four must-consider criteria for International Student Services when selecting a school.  See for yourself.    

,[text] =>

From academic help to student life, and visas requirements to housing options, International Student Services offices around the world work hard to welcome and support international students from all walks of life.  Finding a university that matches your interests—and your needs—as an international student takes a bit of work.  We’ve put together a list of several factors for international students to consider when evaluating a prospective university.  Take a closer look. 

 

1. Numbers of Students

Generally speaking, if there are more international students on a campus, there are probably more resources.  At schools with big international populations, like Polk State College, or Centennial College, you can expect to find services for admissions counseling, social services, financial aid help, and mentoring programs.  One downside?  Make sure schools with larger international student populations have the services that match the numbers, otherwise you may experience a backlog and not get the help when you need it. 

Consider the benefits of schools with a small international student population, like Vilnius Business College in Lithuania or West Hills College in the US.  Just because a university, like the University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria, has a small international population doesn’t mean that there are no services.  It might just mean that the university has a smaller International Student Services office. Even small schools—some with as little as .5 percent of its population made up of international students—have services to help students with visas, travel, accommodations, the academic calendar, and familiarizing themselves with the community.  You might also get more personalized attention than you would at a larger school.

 

2. Mentoring Systems

Think about how a university welcomes its international students from the get-go. International students at top-rated Lund University in Sweden are greeted by student mentors and staff when they arrive at the airport.  Then they attend a fun social event where they meet other international students, and some of the faculty and staff in their programs.  Lund’s two-week orientation for all students combines special topics for international students on Swedish culture and food. Scotland’s University of Glasgow offers international students a similar welcome—and continued support with programs on Scotland’s history, and even workshops on budgeting and saving.

Why is this important?  You won’t succeed if you don’t feel welcomed by your new community.  Look for a school that works to welcome you and to continue to help you acclimate to your new school.

 

3. International Students Associations

Are there any on campus?  You’ll need more than just an International Student Services office—you’ll need the support of other international students. North Iowa Area Community College features an International Students and Friends Club for international and migrant students, as well as domestic students who want to get involved with the college’s international community. MIT is another example of a campus with a vibrant International Student Association.  In an effort to provide learning opportunities for all of its students, MIT allows domestic students to join the association also.  Their goal?  To promote cultural diversity on campus.  Not only to they offer delicious study breaks and fun trips, they also encourage students to get involved on their campus and the local community. 

 

4. Housing Help

You make “home” wherever you go in this world.  It’s nice to have help, especially when you’re not just new to the school, but new to the country, too.  Your International Student Office, like the ones at Western Iowa Tech Community College, College of Southern Idaho or Bifröst University in Iceland, should be able to direct you to on-campus options—and should also put you in touch with other students, faculty, and even local families who may have rooms or apartments for rent.  Think about what you want and how much money you want to spend.  If you want to save money, consider renting a room from a local family or a faculty member.  You can also contact your International Student Services office for help in finding a roommate. 

Studying abroad is one of the most exciting options you can consider as a student.   Bottom line?  Do your homework.  Research the schools where you might want to study.  Visit, if you can.  Talk to the staff at the International Student Services offices.  Get a feel for what you want—and focus on what you need. 

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Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[text] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

About Learning Styles

According to an article published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the term learning style “refers to the fact that each person has a different way of accumulating knowledge.” This concept was first proposed in the 1970s, with a number of different models emerging to represent the way researchers believe human beings learn.

It’s important to note that while learning styles may indeed reflect individual preferences for how information is received, there’s no conclusive evidence indicating that identifying a person’s preferred learning style impacts outcomes. Still, many schools assess learning styles to help teachers and students alike better understand the process.

Understanding Learning Styles

Proposed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, the VARK model is one of the most commonly accepted classifications of learning styles. It comprises four modalities, including the following:

 

1. Visual (V)

Do you feel like you learn better through graphics? If so, you may be a visual learner. This mode includes the depiction of information via “maps, spider diagrams, charts, graphs, flow charts, labeled diagrams, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices, that people use to represent what could have been presented in words.”

Visual learning methods typically include patterns, shapes, designs and whitespace, but do not include pictures, photographs, videos, movies or even PowerPoint presentations. While words in boxes may be preferable for different types of learners, visual learners prefer that information be conveyed via diagrams, meaningful symbols, and other graphic formats.

For visual learners, seeking out courses which incorporate lots of visuals is a great start. Drawing visuals of problems; using graphing calculators; and developing your own visual aids, such as cognitive maps and charts, can further enrich your learning experience.

 

2. Aural/Auditory (A)

Do you feel like you take in information better when you hear it spoken aloud or say it out loud to yourself? If so, you may be an aural/auditory learner. According to VARK-Learn’s definition, individuals in this category learn best from “lectures, group discussion, radio, email, using mobile phones, speaking, web-chat and talking things through.”

Also included in this learning mode? Email -- because it is often conveyed and received “chat-style.” Aural/auditory learners also prefer sorting out their thoughts and questions aloud -- often repeating what they’ve heard aloud in their own words.

If you fall into the aural/auditory learning mode category, recommended study strategies include attending lectures; reading textbook information aloud; recording text materials as well as lectures; and choosing classes with opportunities for oral discussion.

 

3. Read/Write (R)

Are you all about words? Do you remember what you read better than what you hear? If so, you likely have a preference for the read/write learning modality. One of the most popular modes of learning for teachers and students, this category comprises “text-based input and output,” such as reading and writing assignments, essays, reports and manuals. Commonly relied on resources for read/write learners include dictionaries, quotations, the internet, PowerPoint, and lists.

Study strategies for students who prefer this learning style include reading textbooks; taking good notes; and choosing courses which focus on writing assignments.

 

4. Kinesthetic (K)

Do you learn best by doing? If so, your preference may be the increasingly prevalent kinesthetic model, which prioritizes the use of experience and practice over concepts and theory. According to VARK-Learn, “people who prefer this mode are connected to reality, either through concrete personal experiences, examples, practice or simulation.”  This active, tactile approach includes everything from demonstrations and simulations to videos and movies. Case studies, applications and practice (either real or simulated) are also preferred kinesthetic learning methods.

Kinesthetic learning can be particularly valuable to STEM students, according to edutopia, because it helps them breach mental barriers, accept different approaches to information, and ultimately assume a more “receptive state required for learning.”

Manipulative study strategies work well for kinesthetic learners, including writing, making visuals and models, using your fingers, and preparing index cards. Furthermore, incorporating movement while studying -- from chewing gum to tapping your pencil -- can help support focus and attention.

One last thing to keep in mind? Learning styles aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, research indicates that many students amalgamate a mix of learning styles. Even better? There’s no proof that a single learning style or combination of learning styles is more effective or less effective than another. Rather, it’s all about what works best for you.

 

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Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[db_lead] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

,[text] =>

Success in school relies on many things. One aspect many new college students may underestimate when first starting out? Their individual learning styles. The truth is that all learning styles are not created equal: We each learn, absorb and master information differently. The more you know about how you learn, the more prepared you’ll be to seek out classes, professors, programs, and schools which best suit your unique preferences.

About Learning Styles

According to an article published in the Current Health Sciences Journal, the term learning style “refers to the fact that each person has a different way of accumulating knowledge.” This concept was first proposed in the 1970s, with a number of different models emerging to represent the way researchers believe human beings learn.

It’s important to note that while learning styles may indeed reflect individual preferences for how information is received, there’s no conclusive evidence indicating that identifying a person’s preferred learning style impacts outcomes. Still, many schools assess learning styles to help teachers and students alike better understand the process.

Understanding Learning Styles

Proposed by Fleming and Mills in 1992, the VARK model is one of the most commonly accepted classifications of learning styles. It comprises four modalities, including the following:

 

1. Visual (V)

Do you feel like you learn better through graphics? If so, you may be a visual learner. This mode includes the depiction of information via “maps, spider diagrams, charts, graphs, flow charts, labeled diagrams, and all the symbolic arrows, circles, hierarchies and other devices, that people use to represent what could have been presented in words.”

Visual learning methods typically include patterns, shapes, designs and whitespace, but do not include pictures, photographs, videos, movies or even PowerPoint presentations. While words in boxes may be preferable for different types of learners, visual learners prefer that information be conveyed via diagrams, meaningful symbols, and other graphic formats.

For visual learners, seeking out courses which incorporate lots of visuals is a great start. Drawing visuals of problems; using graphing calculators; and developing your own visual aids, such as cognitive maps and charts, can further enrich your learning experience.

 

2. Aural/Auditory (A)

Do you feel like you take in information better when you hear it spoken aloud or say it out loud to yourself? If so, you may be an aural/auditory learner. According to VARK-Learn’s definition, individuals in this category learn best from “lectures, group discussion, radio, email, using mobile phones, speaking, web-chat and talking things through.”

Also included in this learning mode? Email -- because it is often conveyed and received “chat-style.” Aural/auditory learners also prefer sorting out their thoughts and questions aloud -- often repeating what they’ve heard aloud in their own words.

If you fall into the aural/auditory learning mode category, recommended study strategies include attending lectures; reading textbook information aloud; recording text materials as well as lectures; and choosing classes with opportunities for oral discussion.

 

3. Read/Write (R)

Are you all about words? Do you remember what you read better than what you hear? If so, you likely have a preference for the read/write learning modality. One of the most popular modes of learning for teachers and students, this category comprises “text-based input and output,” such as reading and writing assignments, essays, reports and manuals. Commonly relied on resources for read/write learners include dictionaries, quotations, the internet, PowerPoint, and lists.

Study strategies for students who prefer this learning style include reading textbooks; taking good notes; and choosing courses which focus on writing assignments.

 

4. Kinesthetic (K)

Do you learn best by doing? If so, your preference may be the increasingly prevalent kinesthetic model, which prioritizes the use of experience and practice over concepts and theory. According to VARK-Learn, “people who prefer this mode are connected to reality, either through concrete personal experiences, examples, practice or simulation.”  This active, tactile approach includes everything from demonstrations and simulations to videos and movies. Case studies, applications and practice (either real or simulated) are also preferred kinesthetic learning methods.

Kinesthetic learning can be particularly valuable to STEM students, according to edutopia, because it helps them breach mental barriers, accept different approaches to information, and ultimately assume a more “receptive state required for learning.”

Manipulative study strategies work well for kinesthetic learners, including writing, making visuals and models, using your fingers, and preparing index cards. Furthermore, incorporating movement while studying -- from chewing gum to tapping your pencil -- can help support focus and attention.

One last thing to keep in mind? Learning styles aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, research indicates that many students amalgamate a mix of learning styles. Even better? There’s no proof that a single learning style or combination of learning styles is more effective or less effective than another. Rather, it’s all about what works best for you.

 

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Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[text] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and business person may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

 

1. Perfusionist

Never heard of this job before? Neither had we until we stumbled upon someone enthusing over it on Reddit. So what is a perfusionist? Also known as a cardiovascular perfusionist or clinical perfusionist, these specialized healthcare professionals are a critical part of any cardiothoracic team. Perfusionists are trained in operating heart-lung machines, which are used to temporarily replace both circulatory and respiratory function during cardiac surgery.

While this job can be stressful, it’s also incredibly fulfilling as perfusionists are directly involved in life-saving procedures. You can expect to be well-rewarded financially, as well: Experienced perfusionists can earn upwards of $100,000 a year.

You also can’t go wrong with this job in terms of security. As the population ages, the American Society for Extracorporeal Technology anticipates that demand will continue to rise for certified perfusionists.

 

2. Technical Writer

Technical companies may have amazing products and services, but if they can’t communicate their use to the public in an understandable way, they are unlikely to succeed. Enter technical writers.

These detail-oriented professionals typically have a combination of strong writing and critical thinking skills, along with a technical background which qualifies them to translate complex scientific or technical information in a coherent way. Technical writers work in a variety of industries with engineering and computer companies particularly in need of their services.

 

3. Accent Reduction Specialist

You may have never heard of accent reduction specialists before, but these professionals scored the top spot on a CNN roundup of “10 little-known fields with great job opportunities.”

So what do accent reduction specialists do? Simply put, they help people with strong accents and/or poor language skills learn to communicate better in order to break down barriers, change perception, and promote understanding. And while accent reduction specialists work with people with regional accents, their services are expected to be increasingly in demand with the globalization of the economy.

No formal certification is necessary to work in this field, but many accent reduction specialists begin their careers with an associate or bachelor’s degree in speech. Advanced studies in speech-language pathology, meanwhile, further qualify you to succeed as an accent reduction specialist.

 

4. Court Stenographer

Most people only think of lawyers and judges when they ponder legal careers, but the reality there are many different kinds of professionals working behind the scenes, including court stenographers. The most widely used form of recording court proceedings, stenography is the act of recording spoken words -- either through the use of a stenotype machine or shorthand.

In addition to working inside courtrooms, stenographers can also be found everywhere from corporate work to providing closed captioning services for the hard-of-hearing. Regardless of the setting, speed and accuracy are hallmarks of the best stenographers.

While many court stenographers are employed by legal entities, others work on a freelance basis. Your takeaway? If the thought of making your own schedule and working independently appeals to you, then you may have a bright future in this field -- which was listed by Business Insider as one of “16 Awesome Career Choices That Most College Kids Have Never Heard Of.”

 

5. Blacksmith

Also earning a spot on Business Insider’s list? Blacksmiths. Many people mistakenly assume that this craft -- which involves shaping iron and steel by forging them in fire --  is no longer practiced, but metalsmithing is very much alive and well today.

Blacksmithing involves far more than making horseshoes. It’s also a wonderful way to express your creativity. In fact, for people who enjoy design, working with their hands, and interacting with others, blacksmithing offers up a compelling counterpoint to an office job.

Wondering how to get started in blacksmithing? Programs like Fleming College’s Visual and Creative Arts Diploma (VCAD) offer exposure to foundational courses as well as studio-based learning and techniques in blacksmithing and other electives.

While conventional careers have plenty to offer, they can also be less-than-exciting, especially if you land on them by default. By researching as many potential career pathways as possible, you can ensure that you choose the one most likely to help you find fulfillment -- even if it comes from an unlikely or unexpected source.

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Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[db_lead] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and businessperson may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

,[text] =>

Think fast! Name the first five careers that come to the top of your head. If you’re like most people, titles like doctor, lawyer, teacher and business person may first come to mind. However, there are near-endless other options out there when it comes to finding a job that’s right for you. To help get you thinking outside the box, we’ve rounded up five little-known potential careers worth exploring.

 

1. Perfusionist

Never heard of this job before? Neither had we until we stumbled upon someone enthusing over it on Reddit. So what is a perfusionist? Also known as a cardiovascular perfusionist or clinical perfusionist, these specialized healthcare professionals are a critical part of any cardiothoracic team. Perfusionists are trained in operating heart-lung machines, which are used to temporarily replace both circulatory and respiratory function during cardiac surgery.

While this job can be stressful, it’s also incredibly fulfilling as perfusionists are directly involved in life-saving procedures. You can expect to be well-rewarded financially, as well: Experienced perfusionists can earn upwards of $100,000 a year.

You also can’t go wrong with this job in terms of security. As the population ages, the American Society for Extracorporeal Technology anticipates that demand will continue to rise for certified perfusionists.

 

2. Technical Writer

Technical companies may have amazing products and services, but if they can’t communicate their use to the public in an understandable way, they are unlikely to succeed. Enter technical writers.

These detail-oriented professionals typically have a combination of strong writing and critical thinking skills, along with a technical background which qualifies them to translate complex scientific or technical information in a coherent way. Technical writers work in a variety of industries with engineering and computer companies particularly in need of their services.

 

3. Accent Reduction Specialist

You may have never heard of accent reduction specialists before, but these professionals scored the top spot on a CNN roundup of “10 little-known fields with great job opportunities.”

So what do accent reduction specialists do? Simply put, they help people with strong accents and/or poor language skills learn to communicate better in order to break down barriers, change perception, and promote understanding. And while accent reduction specialists work with people with regional accents, their services are expected to be increasingly in demand with the globalization of the economy.

No formal certification is necessary to work in this field, but many accent reduction specialists begin their careers with an associate or bachelor’s degree in speech. Advanced studies in speech-language pathology, meanwhile, further qualify you to succeed as an accent reduction specialist.

 

4. Court Stenographer

Most people only think of lawyers and judges when they ponder legal careers, but the reality there are many different kinds of professionals working behind the scenes, including court stenographers. The most widely used form of recording court proceedings, stenography is the act of recording spoken words -- either through the use of a stenotype machine or shorthand.

In addition to working inside courtrooms, stenographers can also be found everywhere from corporate work to providing closed captioning services for the hard-of-hearing. Regardless of the setting, speed and accuracy are hallmarks of the best stenographers.

While many court stenographers are employed by legal entities, others work on a freelance basis. Your takeaway? If the thought of making your own schedule and working independently appeals to you, then you may have a bright future in this field -- which was listed by Business Insider as one of “16 Awesome Career Choices That Most College Kids Have Never Heard Of.”

 

5. Blacksmith

Also earning a spot on Business Insider’s list? Blacksmiths. Many people mistakenly assume that this craft -- which involves shaping iron and steel by forging them in fire --  is no longer practiced, but metalsmithing is very much alive and well today.

Blacksmithing involves far more than making horseshoes. It’s also a wonderful way to express your creativity. In fact, for people who enjoy design, working with their hands, and interacting with others, blacksmithing offers up a compelling counterpoint to an office job.

Wondering how to get started in blacksmithing? Programs like Fleming College’s Visual and Creative Arts Diploma (VCAD) offer exposure to foundational courses as well as studio-based learning and techniques in blacksmithing and other electives.

While conventional careers have plenty to offer, they can also be less-than-exciting, especially if you land on them by default. By researching as many potential career pathways as possible, you can ensure that you choose the one most likely to help you find fulfillment -- even if it comes from an unlikely or unexpected source.

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

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Queensland Australia just released an ambitious plan to double its numbers of international students by 2026, capture 20 percent of the market share, and create 6,800 new jobs in international education.  Find out more.

,[text] =>

As Australia’s study abroad numbers continue to skyrocket, Queensland recently announced its goal to double the number of international students to over 190,000 by 2026.  Deputy Premier, Minister for Trade and Investment and Ministerial Champion for International Education and Training at the Queensland University of Technology released the International Education and Training Strategy to Advance Queensland 2016-2026, or the IET, earlier in November.  Why?  To capture 20 percent of the Australian market share and to create about 6,800 jobs.   

How will Queensland achieve these ambitious goals?  The IET outlines 36 initiatives that will help promote Queensland to an international market, enhance student experiences, and connect all sectors across international education.  Deputy Premier Jackie Trad stated, “The goal of increased market share is not at all costs.”  She continued, “The strategy focuses on improved student experiences inside and outside the classroom.” 

How much will this expansion cost?  The Queensland Government pledged $25.3 million to support the strategy over the next five years, exceeding the value of the National Strategy, which is $12 million over four years.  The IET will provide an additional $6 million over five years for initiatives that dovetail with the strategy, making it the largest fund in Australia devoted only to international education. 

The IET Partnership Fund will focus specifically on funding collaborative initiatives to push Queensland to the forefront of international education, at a rate of $1.2 million per year.  The Partnership Fund will be available to groups of at least two parties, including education providers, local government, regional study clusters, and other supporting partners for projects that aim to promote Queensland internationally, enhance international student experiences, connect industry, and strengthen regions.  Applications will open in early 2017.

In addition to this push, Queensland aims to set new targets for international student satisfaction, and overall sector engagement and satisfaction. 

Learn more about studying in Australia

 

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[db_lead] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

,[text] =>

US President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may lead countries which are “steadfast allies and the closest of friends,” but the gloves were off earlier this year when the two traded barbs regarding one critical question: “Who’s better at hockey?” 

But while the exchange may have elicited laughter during a White House welcoming ceremony, the truth is that hockey is no laughing matter in Canada -- at least when it comes to the high cost of participation for youth players. Here’s a closer look at the issue.

Hockey or College?

Hockey may be Canada’s national sport, but is it worth a higher education or retirement? According to a recent survey conducted by Leger for CST Consultants Inc., this is exactly the dilemma faced by many Canadian families today.

Of the thousands of Canadians who responded to CST’s “Beyond the Blue Line” survey, 34 percent said they or someone they knew needed to pull their kids from extracurriculars like sports in order to trim costs; 29 percent said they or someone they knew had borrowed money to afford putting their kids in organized sports; and 16 percent said they or someone they knew put paying for youth hockey ahead of saving for college or retirement.

Planning for Both

The survey also shows that Canadians value hockey and higher education in near-equal measure, with 61 percent of Canadians agreeing that saving for college is more important than paying for extracurriculars like hockey; and 60 percent expressing the belief that every Canadian child should have the opportunity to play the sport because it’s part of the Canadian culture.

However, it doesn’t have to be one or the other, according to CST Consultants Vice President Peter Lewis, who reiterates the value for families in investing in long-term saving strategies, such as a Registered Education Savings plan (RESP).

Says Lewis, “We know how important it is for parents to give their children a balanced education, and extracurricular activities are a part of striking that balance. Parents need to really take a hard look at their priorities when it comes to funding a dream that can truly make an impact on a child’s life, and that includes helping them with their post-secondary education costs.”

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